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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Clover, WV
    Posts
    161

    Default Do you consider a cutout to be a brood break?

    I have done a few cutouts recently, that are possibly too late in the year, but they were nuisance bees and were going to be killed regardless. If you find the queen and transfer her during a cutout, how long does she wait to begin laying in the hive? Is it long enough to be considered a brood break?
    John Sampson-Tucker County, WV
    14 hives - All cutouts and swarms

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,729

    Default Re: Do you consider a cutout to be a brood break?

    A laying queen will probably just continue laying. No break. I seldom find the queen but sometimes get her anyway. Often they end up raising a new one anyway even if you get her as they blame everything on the queen... and their lives have been disrupted...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Casey, Il, USA
    Posts
    1,180

    Default Re: Do you consider a cutout to be a brood break?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    A laying queen will probably just continue laying. No break. I seldom find the queen but sometimes get her anyway. Often they end up raising a new one anyway even if you get her as they blame everything on the queen... and their lives have been disrupted...
    is that why they do that, I had a cut out this yr that the queen was laying great right after and then it dwindled for a bit and then boomed and when I finally found her again it was a different queen.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,901

    Default Re: Do you consider a cutout to be a brood break?

    If you transfer brood comb from the cutout then nothing really changes, but if you do cutouts and don't reuse any of the brood comb, and start the bees out on new combs or foundation, then I think it probably helps some, because you are not transferring mites in the brood.

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