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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    778

    Default Let's talk about roofs

    .

    I have built about 10 top bar hives in the past, but someone is special-ordering two hives from me of which they want a more fancy
    roof style than what I'm used to building.

    I'd love to see photos and explanations of all of your various roof styles out there. I tried to do a search for roofs and I couldn't find a thread dedicated to only roofs.

    Specifically, what the lady wants is this:

    A slightly pitched roof with white wood shingles. In fact, she wants the entire outside painted white.

    If anyone has any input on such a roof or other designs, it would be much, much appreciated.

    .

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Accomac, Virginia
    Posts
    185

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    DSCF1815.jpgThis is one of my 10 Bars, you could use similar and then nail on the wood shingles an paint them. Lowes and Home depot have the shingles/shakes. Angles on mine are 19 degrees.
    Ed

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Chicagoland, IL, USA
    Posts
    71

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    As a female with a bum shoulder, I've built my tbh's to have a tilting roof. Meaning the roof doesn't come off entirely but the long side tilts up like a trestle table top (easier on the shoulder).

    The roof is made out of 2x2's with a 4" lag bolt through the top corner of the hive into and through the roof, so the roof pivots. The drawback to this design was that I did not plan adequately for the hinge - so in order to make it work, I had to cut a notch out of the rectangular end piece. I covered the roof in aluminum (what was on hand), but you could certainly use shingles (check the weight of that - I went super light so the unit didn't tip at all when open).

    It's dark here now, I'll get photos tomorrow morning and post them here....

    IMG_3952.jpg This shows the notch on the right side of the end of the hive.

    IMG_3953.jpg This is the inside of the roof showing the structure of the unit. We used what was on hand.

    IMG_3954.jpg This is the overall view. You can see the lag bolt on the right top corner. The bolt is on the inside of the hive and the nut is on the outside. Yes, the bees built burr comb on the bolt that I periodically have to scrape off. I should have recessed the bolt head, but feared for structure if I did that.

    Hope these images help someone else!
    Last edited by Life is Good!; 07-23-2013 at 09:05 AM. Reason: adding photos

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Marquette, Michigan
    Posts
    65

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    I built two tbh's with this roof. No shingles, white aluminum flashing over 1x12'simage.jpg

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    St. Louis, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    626

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    Crabbcatjohn posted a picture of a hive he used to sell that had a shingle roof on it. Check out his pic on the Venting Suggestions thread. Looks like cedar shake over boards.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Jefferson Co, TX
    Posts
    546

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    Life is good. That is a nice good lookin roof. I like that design.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
    Posts
    1,445

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    I like the idea of a hinged roof, but I like to be able to get to both sides of the hive when inspecting.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Chicagoland, IL, USA
    Posts
    71

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    Marshmasterpat - I cannot take credit for the design. My TBH mentor found it somewhere on-line and I used his method of connecting the roof. Original design was apparently more complicated and he simplified it. I like that the roof goes completely to vertical, so it's completely out of the way during inspections. I also have the roof tilting towards the prevailing winds, which offers a bit of a wind-break during inspections. Not heaving a heavy roof off the hive surely saves my shoulder!

    Shannonswyatt - I have windows along the entire side of the hive - both sides. So when I go to inspect, I start by looking into each window and viewing what's going on where that I might need to check out further. I take a note of where the comb I wish to inspect is in the hive and then I'm more prepared once I do start taking out bars. I found queen cups along an edge of a comb a few weeks back that way. No one was home, nor have the bees put anyone in the cups since....they're just sitting there along the edge!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
    Posts
    1,445

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    Cool. I like having both sides open during an inspection, but that is just me. About every third inspection is with my wife and daughter, so I like having the room.

    I like light roofs. Last one was made with coraplast with stryofoam glued in to provide rigidity. Then just some wood on the ends and sides to give it strength. Very light. As long as it doesnt get blown off it should last a long time.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Portland, OR, USA
    Posts
    637

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    Our roofs are are peaked and hinge. We came up with a simple hinging design with a L-shaped slot at each end of the roof that slides over a bushing on each end of the hive body. This way it hinges, can be add/removed easily and doesn't require actual hinge hardware.

    top_bar_hive_stand_roof_ope__31235.1361425256.1280.1280.jpg
    top_bar_hive_back_closed__40452.1361425255.1280.1280.jpg

    Best,
    Matt

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Kemp, Texas
    Posts
    62

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    You can tell them that some of us just use old political signs on top of the top-bars. But I spend about $10 building my hives from pallet wood and other salvaged materials.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Benton, Ky
    Posts
    76

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    Quote Originally Posted by Colleen O. View Post
    Crabbcatjohn posted a picture of a hive he used to sell that had a shingle roof on it. Check out his pic on the Venting Suggestions thread. Looks like cedar shake over boards.
    I think you misunderstood Colleen, I still sell the cedar shingle roof hives on my website, i just don't sell the fancy hand painted ones.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    136

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    Quote Originally Posted by Cacklewack View Post
    Our roofs are are peaked and hinge. We came up with a simple hinging design with a L-shaped slot at each end of the roof that slides over a bushing on each end of the hive body. This way it hinges, can be add/removed easily and doesn't require actual hinge hardware.

    top_bar_hive_stand_roof_ope__31235.1361425256.1280.1280.jpg
    That's really a fantastic idea! I'm halfway through building a new TBH and now browsing Beesource, wondering about roofs and ventilation etc.

    I guess it balances there, with some careful construction. But I might add a chain or something to keep the roof from flopping over further (and pulling the hive with it?). I like that the roof is also removable.
    Beekeeping - a form of magic that weaves together two elements: wood and bees.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,194

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    Quote Originally Posted by shannonswyatt View Post
    I like the idea of a hinged roof, but I like to be able to get to both sides of the hive when inspecting.
    I got a bee thinking hive. The roof is double aluminum with a neoprene like material between...light, waterproof and I expect a reasonable r value. It has a lag bolt that fits in a notch so you can simply tilt it back or slide it forward an inch and lift it off. Works great. They show it on their site.
    Janne....first hives April 2013, 19 hives, treat, plant zone 8b, at sea level, latitude 49.13, longitude 123.06

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    London, United Kingdom
    Posts
    184

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs


  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    136

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    Quote Originally Posted by AugustC View Post
    Here is how I pitch my roofs.

    http://augustcottageapiary.wordpress...a-topbar-hive/ <<== (link corrected from above.)
    That page has been my primary reference, especially for the step-by-step process, though I've looked at other plans as well. Thanks!

    Here's another Beesource thread where I ask if the space under the roof should be open to the outside, especially considering that the bees that come up from below during inspection might want to be able to get down to the colony below, after the roof is closed.

    I haven't built my roof yet (getting my bees for the TBH on Friday!), but according to your specs, the roof is closed to the outside, with 1/8" space around the sides and a solid roof. So I wonder, if that's true, do you brush the wandering bees off the bars (and chase out any that have got to the underside of the roof) ... or what?
    Beekeeping - a form of magic that weaves together two elements: wood and bees.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
    Posts
    1,445

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    I leave a little more room on mine. If not you will have to raise it up on the summer to keep the hive cool. a vent on the end (unless it is wide open) probably won't move enough air on top.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    London, United Kingdom
    Posts
    184

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    Quote Originally Posted by Kofu View Post
    I haven't built my roof yet (getting my bees for the TBH on Friday!), but according to your specs, the roof is closed to the outside, with 1/8" space around the sides and a solid roof. So I wonder, if that's true, do you brush the wandering bees off the bars (and chase out any that have got to the underside of the roof) ... or what?
    You would be surprised at how little space the bees (or wasps for that matter) require to get through. There isn't much chance of making the roof space bee proof without creating a receiving lip all the way around the roof frame. I really don't think it matters if the bees can get in there or not. The only thing I will say is it is VERY important to have all the top bars in place or wasps and robber bees can get into the roof and then often into the hive along the side of the follower board.
    I don't tend to have many (if any) bees left on the topbars after an inspection but if there are because I have eg cleared a comb of bees I gently brush them over the edge with some grass and they find their way to the entrance quite easily. Mostly I leave a small v gap between the follower board and the last bar and they head off down there.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    136

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    I wonder if it makes better sense to leave the ends open, with an option to close them off in the winter for better insulation?

    What sort of space attracts wasps? Open and large enough for their nest, and protected from the rain? And how do people deal with wasps that start a hive under the lid/roof? Can't just spray them with insecticide...
    Beekeeping - a form of magic that weaves together two elements: wood and bees.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
    Posts
    1,445

    Default Re: Let's talk about roofs

    The only thing I find in there is spiders.

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