Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Campbell River, BC, CA
    Posts
    840

    Default Caging and attendants

    I'm going to take a couple queens out of hives later this weekend and cage them in jzbz cages. They will be placed in another hive within a couple hours of going into the cages, with a marshmallow. The recipient hives are hopelessly queenless today.

    Do I need to put attendants in with these queens? Or are they ok for a 3 hour trip without any attendants ? First time for everything, and this will be the first time I put queens into cages, rather than set them up to get out.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    new castle delaware usa
    Posts
    200

    Default Re: Caging and attendants

    No , Put a drop of honey on the cage, that should last her till you put her in the hive. Then the bees in the hive will feed her. Attendants don`t belong in their hive, they will accept her better with out em. You need attendants for shipping, best to take them out before intro. JMHO,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Pete

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,052

    Default Re: Caging and attendants

    Yes, definitely put a few big fat nurse bees with them during the
    trip. Put them outside but contain within another box. Not to put them inside the jzbz cage with the queen.
    And the big fat nurse bees the other hive will accept them. Only a few you have to put in not a lot to keep the queen
    comfortable for a few hours.
    Last edited by beepro; 05-08-2015 at 11:48 PM.
    I luv bee source!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ojai, California
    Posts
    1,207

    Default Re: Caging and attendants

    Oops! Double-post.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ojai, California
    Posts
    1,207

    Default Re: Caging and attendants

    For shipping, they do well with 7 to 10 attendants per queen.

    Introducing foreign queens is best done under a push-in cage, over part honey, part bee bread (pollen), mostly capped brood. If the host colony does not accept her right away, the hatching bees will, and after she begins laying in the open cells, they usually accept her.

    If they are forming an attack ball, don't release her! Wait for them to stop that behavior, and begin feeding the introduced queen to release her.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,931

    Default Re: Caging and attendants

    I agree about adding attendants and using a push-in cage. I would locate the cage over emerging brood with some cells of nectar.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Campbell River, BC, CA
    Posts
    840

    Default Re: Caging and attendants

    In this case, I wont be doing the install. I'm busting up a colony to make it into a batch of mating nucs and caging the queen to give to a local club member who has a single hive that's ended up queenless this spring. He doesn't have the resources to help them make a new one, and after I put a batch of cells into the mating nucs, I'll have more queens than I know what to do with. It's a good problem to have, all part of this year's plan.

    I'll only have 5 nucs in each set, but my goals are not about quantity. The goal for this year is to get some hands on experience raising queens, consistently and on a schedule, grafting every second saturday. A side effect, I'll end up with more queens than I have hives to put them in, so I dont mind helping out a local club member that's stuck.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads