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Thread: Dying hive

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    1

    Default Dying hive

    I have a top bar hive that had a problem with larvae dying and some of the brood dyed as it was leaving the cell. There is no more queen so the rest of the bees are slowly dwindling.
    Any ideas if I should reuse wax or destroy? Thanks for any help. I will try to post a photo

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Cumberland Va.
    Posts
    299

    Default Re: Dying hive

    Wow, thats sad. Not enough bees to re-queen? Have you any idea if it was EFB or AFB or lack of bees to keep the hive right killing the brood? I re queened a laying worker hive earlier, with some help from another hives broodframe. I dont know but I wish you well friend. G

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    1,102

    Default Re: Dying hive

    Quote Originally Posted by Joshsears View Post
    I have a top bar hive that had a problem with larvae dying and some of the brood dyed as it was leaving the cell. There is no more queen so the rest of the bees are slowly dwindling.
    Any ideas if I should reuse wax or destroy? Thanks for any help. I will try to post a photo
    I wouldn't jump to the worst possible cause right away. Definately post pics, along with number of active brood and honey frames. What did the hive look like weeks, months ago...were they a thriving big population. If they obsconded and swarmed big, a lack of nurse bees could cause starvation and chill. Do you see remnants of capped queen cells?

    I believe there is a lab in Maryland and few other places that can test for EFB, AFB etc. Check with your state apariast. Send a sample in and if it comes back clean you could resuse everything maybe just pitch the comb and wash the boxes. If you do have AFB the frames should be burned and the boxes scorched, radiated or boiled in wax. AFB will have thick scale on cell walls and sunken cappings. Dead larva still string when probed with a toothpick

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Walker, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    774

    Default Re: Dying hive

    Selfishly, dying hives always worry me. If they are mite-infested, then they are spreading their mite load to every bee who inevitably comes to rob the dying hive. Ditto the brood diseases. I would strongly recommend that you actively work to discover WHY this hive is dying and then try to protect your neighbors from whatever this is, even if it means burning the hive now, before it infects even more hives. Hopefully, the cause will be something much more benign that requires much less drastic measures, but you will never know unless you take active control of the situation by calling in someone who knows more.

    JMO


    Rusty
    Rusty Hills Farm -- home of AQHA A Rusty Zipper & Rusty's Bees ( LC and T)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Cookeville, TN, USA
    Posts
    3,595

    Default Re: Dying hive

    Not enough information, but it sounds typical of a mite infested, queenless, robbed out/starving hive. There's a good chance that whatever it is, is likely already being efficiently spread around to any neighboring hives. Only one of the issues with the whole "let the weak ones die" philosophy.

    Does it look like this?

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