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Thread: Honey House

  1. #141
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Manitoba Canada
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    5,480

    Default Re: Honey House

    ya used as a concrete floor treatment. A beekeeper told me some will treat with linseed oil because the cement pours will absorb the oil
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  2. #142
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
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    4,955

    Default Re: Honey House

    I admit I was skeptical about linseed oil as a concrete sealant, but it has been tested on runways and roads subject to severe weather. A study from the University of Manitoba on that subject:
    http://www.ce.ncsu.edu/srizkal/linke...ight_May91.pdf
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  3. #143
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    Jan 2003
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    Default Re: Honey House

    Graham you are a very helpful resource on this site. You wouldn't happen to be a librarian in your working life, eh?

  4. #144
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
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    Default Re: Honey House

    No, I have never been a librarian.

    But sometimes what happens is that I read a post and say, "That's crazy!". But then before I post that (and make myself look foolish ), I think maybe I better check on that first ...


    The first step in finding good online references is to figure out the best search terms. Not surprisingly, the more frequently you do that, the easier it gets.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  5. #145
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    Nov 2012
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    antigonish, nova scotia, canada
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    25

    Default Re: Honey House

    wow wish i knew that before i finished my floor with a regular sealer, it is so slippery now i fell and tore all the ligaments in my ellbow,ian you are right lots of good information posted on this site by all of you
    34 hives, 5 years

  6. #146
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Campbell River, BC, CA
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    382

    Default Re: Honey House

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    ya used as a concrete floor treatment. A beekeeper told me some will treat with linseed oil because the cement pours will absorb the oil
    When I was a kid, grew up in a construction household, and I do remember linseed oil was used for concrete in many places. I seem to remember it being used to treat floors, but I dont remember the details. Got some questions out to the old contractor of the day (dad), and will let you know once I get the details. I do remember we went thru a LOT of it, when building schools in the 70's.

  7. #147
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Grey County, ON, Canada
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    101

    Default Re: Honey House

    Do you think the CFIA guys would go for that?

  8. #148
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    Manitoba Canada
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    Default Re: Honey House

    I don't see why not, it's a plant based oil product. Like the food grade grease I use on my extractor

  9. #149
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    Jun 2011
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    Campbell River, BC, CA
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    382

    Default Re: Honey House

    Ok, I got a response from the old time contractor, I'll quote it here for everybody. Names removed by request of the original source

    ==================
    We used boiled linseed oil to seal concrete so it could be sprayed with salt in the winter without surface damage. We took 1/3 linseed oil and 2/3 diesel fuel mixed and applied it to new concrete when it was cured and dry for 28 days. An week later we applied an other mix , this time 2/3 linseed oil and 1/3 diesel fuel and sprayed it on under dry conditions . The curbs along hi way 16 trough town are still there in the original condition after 40 years where they were not damaged during snow removal because the pores are sealed and no salt could penetrate the surface .We sprayed it on with a pump type sprayer. This was the idea from **** ******* . He was a friend and hi way engineer . Later this idea was rejected because diesel fuel was not friendly to the environment .

    ==============

    I can attest to what he's saying about the hiway curbs, I was there when we sprayed them, and remembered that as soon as I read his email. I was up there last summer, they do look like new. I didn't realize it was the same old set we poured way back when, but he's been keeping an eye on them over the years, didn't move away from that town till last fall, shortly after mom left us, and dad moved to a seniors place that provides meals to otherwise independant living. He's 80 now, so, we excused him for not wanting to learn to cook after mom passed.

  10. #150
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    Manitoba Canada
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    Default Re: Honey House

    Ya, that is what my beekeeper neighbour told me too, the cement absorbed the linseed oil and filled the pours .
    Think I'll skip the desil fuel step though

  11. #151
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Athens, OH
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    2,538

    Default Re: Honey House

    I've seen new terra cotta tile floors treated with used motor oil in Mexico with surprisingly good results.
    Is it solipsistic in here, or is it just me?

  12. #152
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    White House, TN
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    46

    Default Re: Honey House

    Quote Originally Posted by marios View Post
    wow wish i knew that before i finished my floor with a regular sealer, it is so slippery now i fell and tore all the ligaments in my ellbow,ian you are right lots of good information posted on this site by all of you
    You can put a grit paint on and it will help with the floor too late for your elbow

  13. #153
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    Nov 2009
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    1,486

    Default Re: Honey House

    Be careful with lind seed oil. I spilled some once and wiped it up with some rags, then carelessly just threw the rags on my tree stand that was sitting in the corner of the garage. A couple days later I found the rags had started a fire on the platform. It was glowing red hot under those rags. Keep that in mind when using it. I could of burnt the whole house down.

  14. #154
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    Jun 2009
    Location
    Montgomery County, NY
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    1,359

    Default Re: Honey House

    We used to use Linseed Oil to seal the stocks of our Ceremonial M14 rifles. Worked great and gave a wonderful finish to the wood. Never tried it on concrete before and yes rags soaked with linseed oil stuck somewhere in the corner of garages do spontaneously combust. Of course linseed oil is NOT the only oil based product that will do it, I think linseed oil is one of the few products that actually warn users of the danger of spontaneous combustion.

  15. #155
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Yuba City, Ca
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    107

    Default Re: Honey House

    Quote Originally Posted by My-smokepole View Post
    High $$ floor epoxie is self leveling. Pour and squeegee it out with a special squeegee back roll with a spike roller to remove air bubbles. As I remember about 6 mm thick dry. About $ 1.25 a foot to put down as I remember
    Most epoxies don't need a porcupine roller, but it can help release flow trapped air up on cold days. We only use spike rollers for toppers and self levels.

    Depending on the system, we get between $2.50-$6 a sq ft here (labor and mat). This is using a moisture, PH, and alkalinity resistant bottom coat, priming mid with mesh for slip resistance, and one or two color top coats. It usually ends up around 20-30 mils when done. You get what you pay for. We give a 15 year warranty on the epoxy.

    All epoxie coated floors should be shot blasted to a #3 profile. Diamond grinding with a 30 grit soft bond metal will only get you a #2, but it's better than nothing. Do NOT acid wash concrete before applying epoxy. If the installer or manufacture specs acid stripping the slab as "only prep needed," it's junk epoxy and won't hold up. We blast to a #4 profile or into sand whichever comes first.

    FYI, oiling your slab will ensure that NOTHING will ever correctly bond to the surface, ever. If you maybe will put in epoxy, floor covering, or ceramic tile in, oiling the slab will not let anything bond and a 100% floating system will have to be used.

    I have slab core samples being sent to Mineralogy Inc. to lab test for organic surface contaminates (oils and salts). Customer wanted epoxy. After it was applied (not me, but certified applicator) the floor failed. I'm in there trying to mediate the customer and installer. The suspect contaminate is linseed oil installed by the previous owner... Tread accordingly.

    (Heaven forbid...) You do need to use diesel or kerosine with the linseed oil to thin it out. It by itself it not near viscosis enough to penitrate the surface of the slab to seal it. But I do not suggest doing this, ever, even by accident. By our state building code, oil does not provide a food grade seal to the concrete slab. Check local codes before installing anything.

    I'm a newbe beekeeper. By trade, I'm a surface demolition contractor, surface prep, and exposed concrete finisher. I install color and sealers to high and low sheen polished concrete surfaces, install epoxy moisture barriers, and prep concrete substrate to accept the new flooring system buy diamond grinding and shot blasting. I just keep bees because being a contractor in this economy isn't punishing enough.
    Zone 9b. Second year newb.

  16. #156
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    4,044

    Default Re: Honey House

    Quote Originally Posted by CLICKBANGBANG View Post
    Most epoxies don't need a porcupine roller, but it can help release flow trapped air up on cold days. We only use spike rollers for toppers and self levels.

    Depending on the system, we get between $2.50-$6 a sq ft here (labor and mat). This is using a moisture, PH, and alkalinity resistant bottom coat, priming mid with mesh for slip resistance, and one or two color top coats. It usually ends up around 20-30 mils when done. You get what you pay for. We give a 15 year warranty on the epoxy.

    All epoxie coated floors should be shot blasted to a #3 profile. Diamond grinding with a 30 grit soft bond metal will only get you a #2, but it's better than nothing. Do NOT acid wash concrete before applying epoxy. If the installer or manufacture specs acid stripping the slab as "only prep needed," it's junk epoxy and won't hold up. We blast to a #4 profile or into sand whichever comes first.

    FYI, oiling your slab will ensure that NOTHING will ever correctly bond to the surface, ever. If you maybe will put in epoxy, floor covering, or ceramic tile in, oiling the slab will not let anything bond and a 100% floating system will have to be used.

    I have slab core samples being sent to Mineralogy Inc. to lab test for organic surface contaminates (oils and salts). Customer wanted epoxy. After it was applied (not me, but certified applicator) the floor failed. I'm in there trying to mediate the customer and installer. The suspect contaminate is linseed oil installed by the previous owner... Tread accordingly.

    (Heaven forbid...) You do need to use diesel or kerosine with the linseed oil to thin it out. It by itself it not near viscosis enough to penitrate the surface of the slab to seal it. But I do not suggest doing this, ever, even by accident. By our state building code, oil does not provide a food grade seal to the concrete slab. Check local codes before installing anything.

    I'm a newbe beekeeper. By trade, I'm a surface demolition contractor, surface prep, and exposed concrete finisher. I install color and sealers to high and low sheen polished concrete surfaces, install epoxy moisture barriers, and prep concrete substrate to accept the new flooring system buy diamond grinding and shot blasting. I just keep bees because being a contractor in this economy isn't punishing enough.
    Nice informative post. Ya gotta love the breadth of knowledge of some of the folks that show up here. Professionals in other fields, know what I mean?
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  17. #157
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    bridgewater , nova scotia
    Posts
    639

    Default Re: Honey House

    Hows the arm doing ? Any photos of your setup yet ?
    I will be a year before starting our honey house , spending too much money on bees and equipment in the next few months.

    Ben

    Quote Originally Posted by marios View Post
    wow wish i knew that before i finished my floor with a regular sealer, it is so slippery now i fell and tore all the ligaments in my ellbow,ian you are right lots of good information posted on this site by all of you
    Ben Little <The Little Bee Farm> https://www.facebook.com/TheLittleBeeFarm
    Nova Scotia Canada

  18. #158
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    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    5,480

    Default Re: Honey House

    Clickbangbang that was awesome. I'm going to be PM'ing you for your email address if you don't mind me bugging you for further input.

    Do you need to tap into some practical beekeeping experience? I can give you all I've got .

  19. #159
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    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    5,480

    Default Re: Honey House

    Quote Originally Posted by jim lyon View Post
    Nice informative post. Ya gotta love the breadth of knowledge of some of the folks that show up here. Professionals in other fields, know what I mean?
    Gota love when it all comes together,
    I'd say that post from Clickbangbang was a home run !

  20. #160
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Yuba City, Ca
    Posts
    107

    Default Re: Honey House

    Quote Originally Posted by Rader Sidetrack View Post
    I admit I was skeptical about linseed oil as a concrete sealant, but it has been tested on runways and roads subject to severe weather. A study from the University of Manitoba on that subject:
    http://www.ce.ncsu.edu/srizkal/linke...ight_May91.pdf
    This study report is from 1989 and the ASTM C457 has been replaced with new standards and testing methods.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    Clickbangbang that was awesome. I'm going to be PM'ing you for your email address if you don't mind me bugging you for further input.

    Do you need to tap into some practical beekeeping experience? I can give you all I've got .
    Please do get ahold of me if you have any (flooring surface) questions. I'll help out wherever I can.
    Zone 9b. Second year newb.

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