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Thread: Honey House

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    bridgewater , nova scotia
    Posts
    640

    Default Honey House

    Hello all, I want to build a Honey House that will facilitate 500 Hives Max . Anyone have any good ideas on a floor plan and size of a building without getting too many questions thrown at me. Like type of extraction equipment etc ..

    PM me if you actually have experience with planning how to build one please.

    Thanks
    Ben
    Ben Little <The Little Bee Farm> https://www.facebook.com/TheLittleBeeFarm
    Nova Scotia Canada

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Spanish Fork, UT, USA
    Posts
    337

    Default Re: Honey House

    I run a 500 hive operation and have a few ideas for your honey house. Our facility has five rooms.
    Extracting room - this room has two extractors, the uncapping knife, capping dryer, sump, water heater and sink.
    Hot room - this room is heated by a water heater that circulates water through pipes in the floor. This room is where I move the honey supers that need to be extracted.
    Comb room - This is where I store all my supers after they have been extracted. It is large enough to hold about 1500 medium supers.
    Honey tank room - This is where I drain and package my honey.
    Storage room - this is where I store misc stuff. Honey containers, tools, equipment to be repaired.
    On the side of my honey house is a garage where I park my truck.

    In the winter I clean out my hot room and turn it into my workshop to build new equipment and repair old equipment.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    bridgewater , nova scotia
    Posts
    640

    Default Re: Honey House

    Do you have any photos of your building ? and what is the building size ? I am trying to do it right the first time and I guess going a little bigger than I need would be good as well.

    Thanks for the input !

    Ben
    Ben Little <The Little Bee Farm> https://www.facebook.com/TheLittleBeeFarm
    Nova Scotia Canada

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Gothenburg, Nebraska, USA
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: Honey House

    If you go on cook and beals website they have floor plans for extracting rooms that should give you a general idea, otherwise Jon Bs idea sounds good. I'm not sure how necessary the water heater is in the hot room, we run 1500 hives and usually the summer heat keeps it around 100 degrees though we like to run a space heater on there over night to keep it toasty.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    24,483

    Default Re: Honey House

    I think that a number of the equipment suppliers have layouts for different sizes of beekeeping outfits. Maxant did at one time. Maybe you should contact them.
    Mark Berninghausen "Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board." Zora Neale Hurston

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    254

    Default Re: Honey House

    Floor heat in the hot room is a must, ditto on what jon said i leave ours all winter. U can use that hot room for winter work and its relativly cheap to heat.
    AKA BEEMAN800

  7. #7

    Default Re: Honey House

    Sqcrk you might think about two small over head doors for the center room so you can move big things straight Through.
    David

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    24,483

    Default Re: Honey House

    Thanks, that's already in the works.
    Mark Berninghausen "Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board." Zora Neale Hurston

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,481

    Default Re: Honey House

    I have a large over head door going into my facility between the hot room and the extraction room. I plan on having the temp over 30 degreesC in the hot room and about 20 degrees or so in the extraction room. Any ideas on how to keep two rooms closed off to each other so that each room stay at its temp without having to open and close this over head door a thousand times per day?
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    24,483

    Default Re: Honey House

    Can you install a sliding door instead? I have friends w/ sliding door and there isn't a great deal of heat transfer. But, if the rooms are next to each other the extracting room will be hot. In which case fans and sweatbands are necassary.

    I have been wondering about the use of Plastic Strip Doorways like ones I see at the back doors of many grocery stores and between cooler rooms and work areas in the Produce rooms. They seem to keep flying insects out pretty well. I'm thinking about using that between my extracting room and the rest of the building, plus the overhead door.
    Mark Berninghausen "Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board." Zora Neale Hurston

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Montgomery County, NY
    Posts
    1,359

    Default Re: Honey House

    The overhead plastic strips work well but keep in mind the clear plastic gets dirty super easy.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Grey County, ON, Canada
    Posts
    101

    Default Re: Honey House

    I think you'll have a challenge keeping the extraction room cool no matter what you do... Too many electric motors running with extractor/conveyor/augur/spinner/uncapper/water heater etc all running constantly... Combine that with the outside temps being over 20 and I think the only way you could do it would be a big AC unit

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    24,483

    Default Re: Honey House

    Get a big exhaust fan, a barn fan, set in a wall of your extracting room and a window on the cool side of the bldg, the north side?
    Mark Berninghausen "Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board." Zora Neale Hurston

  14. #14

    Default Re: Honey House

    High $$ floor epoxie is self leveling. Pour and squeegee it out with a special squeegee back roll with a spike roller to remove air bubbles. As I remember about 6 mm thick dry. About $ 1.25 a foot to put down as I remember

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,464

    Default Re: Honey House

    We have been using epoxy floors since the 60's. Be careful, you get what you pay for. The best was advertised as "monolithic". I believe there where ground up chunks of epoxy that made the aggregate they mixed with the liquid.

    Crazy Roland

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Yuba City, Ca
    Posts
    107

    Default Re: Honey House

    Quote Originally Posted by My-smokepole View Post
    High $$ floor epoxie is self leveling. Pour and squeegee it out with a special squeegee back roll with a spike roller to remove air bubbles. As I remember about 6 mm thick dry. About $ 1.25 a foot to put down as I remember
    Most epoxies don't need a porcupine roller, but it can help release flow trapped air up on cold days. We only use spike rollers for toppers and self levels.

    Depending on the system, we get between $2.50-$6 a sq ft here (labor and mat). This is using a moisture, PH, and alkalinity resistant bottom coat, priming mid with mesh for slip resistance, and one or two color top coats. It usually ends up around 20-30 mils when done. You get what you pay for. We give a 15 year warranty on the epoxy.

    All epoxie coated floors should be shot blasted to a #3 profile. Diamond grinding with a 30 grit soft bond metal will only get you a #2, but it's better than nothing. Do NOT acid wash concrete before applying epoxy. If the installer or manufacture specs acid stripping the slab as "only prep needed," it's junk epoxy and won't hold up. We blast to a #4 profile or into sand whichever comes first.

    FYI, oiling your slab will ensure that NOTHING will ever correctly bond to the surface, ever. If you maybe will put in epoxy, floor covering, or ceramic tile in, oiling the slab will not let anything bond and a 100% floating system will have to be used.

    I have slab core samples being sent to Mineralogy Inc. to lab test for organic surface contaminates (oils and salts). Customer wanted epoxy. After it was applied (not me, but certified applicator) the floor failed. I'm in there trying to mediate the customer and installer. The suspect contaminate is linseed oil installed by the previous owner... Tread accordingly.

    (Heaven forbid...) You do need to use diesel or kerosine with the linseed oil to thin it out. It by itself it not near viscosis enough to penitrate the surface of the slab to seal it. But I do not suggest doing this, ever, even by accident. By our state building code, oil does not provide a food grade seal to the concrete slab. Check local codes before installing anything.

    I'm a newbe beekeeper. By trade, I'm a surface demolition contractor, surface prep, and exposed concrete finisher. I install color and sealers to high and low sheen polished concrete surfaces, install epoxy moisture barriers, and prep concrete substrate to accept the new flooring system buy diamond grinding and shot blasting. I just keep bees because being a contractor in this economy isn't punishing enough.
    Zone 9b. Second year newb.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    4,044

    Default Re: Honey House

    Quote Originally Posted by CLICKBANGBANG View Post
    Most epoxies don't need a porcupine roller, but it can help release flow trapped air up on cold days. We only use spike rollers for toppers and self levels.

    Depending on the system, we get between $2.50-$6 a sq ft here (labor and mat). This is using a moisture, PH, and alkalinity resistant bottom coat, priming mid with mesh for slip resistance, and one or two color top coats. It usually ends up around 20-30 mils when done. You get what you pay for. We give a 15 year warranty on the epoxy.

    All epoxie coated floors should be shot blasted to a #3 profile. Diamond grinding with a 30 grit soft bond metal will only get you a #2, but it's better than nothing. Do NOT acid wash concrete before applying epoxy. If the installer or manufacture specs acid stripping the slab as "only prep needed," it's junk epoxy and won't hold up. We blast to a #4 profile or into sand whichever comes first.

    FYI, oiling your slab will ensure that NOTHING will ever correctly bond to the surface, ever. If you maybe will put in epoxy, floor covering, or ceramic tile in, oiling the slab will not let anything bond and a 100% floating system will have to be used.

    I have slab core samples being sent to Mineralogy Inc. to lab test for organic surface contaminates (oils and salts). Customer wanted epoxy. After it was applied (not me, but certified applicator) the floor failed. I'm in there trying to mediate the customer and installer. The suspect contaminate is linseed oil installed by the previous owner... Tread accordingly.

    (Heaven forbid...) You do need to use diesel or kerosine with the linseed oil to thin it out. It by itself it not near viscosis enough to penitrate the surface of the slab to seal it. But I do not suggest doing this, ever, even by accident. By our state building code, oil does not provide a food grade seal to the concrete slab. Check local codes before installing anything.

    I'm a newbe beekeeper. By trade, I'm a surface demolition contractor, surface prep, and exposed concrete finisher. I install color and sealers to high and low sheen polished concrete surfaces, install epoxy moisture barriers, and prep concrete substrate to accept the new flooring system buy diamond grinding and shot blasting. I just keep bees because being a contractor in this economy isn't punishing enough.
    Nice informative post. Ya gotta love the breadth of knowledge of some of the folks that show up here. Professionals in other fields, know what I mean?
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,481

    Default Re: Honey House

    Clickbangbang that was awesome. I'm going to be PM'ing you for your email address if you don't mind me bugging you for further input.

    Do you need to tap into some practical beekeeping experience? I can give you all I've got .

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Yuba City, Ca
    Posts
    107

    Default Re: Honey House

    Quote Originally Posted by Rader Sidetrack View Post
    I admit I was skeptical about linseed oil as a concrete sealant, but it has been tested on runways and roads subject to severe weather. A study from the University of Manitoba on that subject:
    http://www.ce.ncsu.edu/srizkal/linke...ight_May91.pdf
    This study report is from 1989 and the ASTM C457 has been replaced with new standards and testing methods.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    Clickbangbang that was awesome. I'm going to be PM'ing you for your email address if you don't mind me bugging you for further input.

    Do you need to tap into some practical beekeeping experience? I can give you all I've got .
    Please do get ahold of me if you have any (flooring surface) questions. I'll help out wherever I can.
    Zone 9b. Second year newb.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,464

    Default Re: Honey House

    Thank you Clickbangbang. My experience concurs with your statements. Spilled hydraulic oil is hard to epoxy over when repairing a damaged flour.

    Crazy Roland

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