Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Humboldt Co., California
    Posts
    70

    Default How to requeen - most effective method?

    I have a questionable queen that I think the hive developed from a queen cell after the swarm.

    Maybe she isn't up to speed yet - still slightly less than a month- but not alot of eggs or larvae showing up.

    However, what is the best way to introduce a new queen into a fairly large thriving hive - so far (lots of honey, pollen and fairly big population still present) to she will be accepted?

    Is is better to just drop the new queen cage in as if it was a new package and let them release her? Or, is it better to use a push-in type cage? I don't want the hive to kill the newly bought queen.

    Thanks for your input.
    Last edited by orthoman; 07-15-2013 at 09:52 AM. Reason: clarification

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Jacksonville, NC
    Posts
    246

    Default Re: How to requeen - most effective method?

    From the choices you present, I would use a push in cage. Place the queen in the push in cage that is set above emerging brood.

    If you want a "safer" one still...make a nuc with two frames of capped brood from the hive you want to requeen. Give it the new purchased queen and let them release her. Once they do, and she starts laying, make the large hive queen less and paper combine with the new formed nuc.
    Never failed me, regardless how strong the hive to be re queened was.
    Just my opinion.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Humboldt Co., California
    Posts
    70

    Default Re: How to requeen - most effective method?

    Thanks for the reply.

    Should I have time delay between making the hive queenless and combining the other hive/queen -- that is, would there be better acceptance if the one hive is queenless for a few days?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Delhi, New York, USA
    Posts
    365

    Default Re: How to requeen - most effective method?

    Hi, I am new, but I had a similar situation...I found that the hive needs to know that they don't have a queen, maybe queenless a few days...a push in cage is good for them to get used to her scent; check a few days later,after installing her in the cage, and see if they are "nice" around her, or if they seem a little "manic" around her...I read that if you can gently push the bees away from her and they calming come back, that is good; if you gently push them away and they seem to aggressively come back then they havent accepted her yet. Wait a few more days, by that time they probably have gotten her out; check again for eggs/larva. That is my take, and it is easier for me being new. I am sure more people will give you their opinions and experiences too. Good luck!
    Last edited by honeyman46408; 07-16-2013 at 06:49 PM. Reason: UNQuote

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Jacksonville, NC
    Posts
    246

    Default Re: How to requeen - most effective method?

    I agree with Cloverdale in the sense that the hive needs to know/realize they are queen less.

    But, and here I am speaking based solely on my experience...the smaller the hive, the sooner they realize they are q less... Larger hives take a bit longer, but not days, that's for sure. Also, keep in mind that the larger the hive, and the more resources they have, the more young bees they have, the faster they proceed to start making their own queen. That is, the sooner they start emergency cells.

    So you don't want to give them too much time to do that. Sometimes they will, regardless how much/little time you give them. Those emergency cells will also play in how easy your new queen gets accepted.

    If I make a large hive q less in the morning, by the evening I present them their new queen. Not release her...In 3 days I observe the behavior, and if all looks good, I then let the bees release her by chewing through the candy.

    If it's a nuc, then I present the new queen in an hour, sometimes 2 or 3.
    Just to reinforce what Cloverdale said...How the bees receive and react to the presence of the new queen will give you clues how ready and willing they are. Here is a short clip in which Michael Palmer shows the thing in action:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RX3BgnOkozs

    Hope I did not complicate too much. Good luck!
    Last edited by honeyman46408; 07-16-2013 at 06:50 PM. Reason: UNQ

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Cookeville, TN, USA
    Posts
    4,149

    Default Re: How to requeen - most effective method?

    Push in cages are probably great, but I've never been able to figure out how to get the 30 dollar bug safely in there - but I have lost a couple in the process of trying.

    On account of that, for me the best way is to remove the old queen, eat lunch then do a tried and true candy release. Leave them alone for a couple of weeks. It's the most reliable way I've tried. If you are moving the new queen from another hive just putting her in riding on the comb of brood and bees from her old hive works pretty good too. Smoke them pretty good at the same time.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Posts
    712

    Default Re: How to requeen - most effective method?

    David

    When I have used introduction cages I select a frame of emerging brood with honey and pollen on the frame and brush off all the bees and bring it inside my house to small bathroom off my kitchen. I place the wire introduction cage on the brood frame and them open up the queen cage enough to allow her a way to get out and just place it underneath the introduction cage. You can then remove her cage and press the introduction cage down firmly onto the brood. I have never lost a queen doing this and have also done it in the front seat of my truck with the windows rolled up.
    "Tradition becomes our security, and when the mind is secure it is in decay".....Krishnamurti

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads