Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 74
  1. #41
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    North Liberty, IN
    Posts
    339

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Also have 20 hives setting right on a peppermint field with full bloom spearmint across the road. This 90+ degree weather will get the peppermint blooming. First week on spearmint bloom hives averaged 1.5-2 supers.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    1,973

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Tim,

    Where would I go to find a summary of the way you do things? I'd like to know about your approach.

    Adam

  3. #43
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    North Liberty, IN
    Posts
    339

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Foster Collins View Post
    Tim,

    Where would I go to find a summary of the way you do things? I'd like to know about your approach.

    Adam
    My FB page pics explains a lot....

  4. #44
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Tineo, Asturias, SPAIN
    Posts
    182

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Ives View Post
    200# would be a bad year per supered hive.

    The amount of soybeans around this year, they could put that up from beans alone.
    Yeah, I live in Spain and have been talking about your methods to some friends, and I always say "almost 200 kilos" - If I recall correctly the average figure was FOUR hundred pounds - so that is where I got the figure 200 from, but confused kilos and pounds.

    Thanks for all the information you share.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    North Liberty, IN
    Posts
    339

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Pre 2010 I wasn't supering till a week before Black locust bloom. Problem with doing that was the overwintered triples was swarming starting 4-27. 16 days to make queens, bees decided they're out of room 4/11. So I started supering well before that date.
    3 deep system has around 300% more bees vs the 2 deep systems. Triples start brooding up earlier vs doubles and queen has 50% more room. Triples start brooding up earlier because they have the resources to do so. Doubles are on the verge of starvation and had to wait till resources start coming in.
    300% more bees equates to 30 frames of brood more from 2/20-4/27. Triples average 18 frames of brood per 21 day cycle doubles average 12 frames per 21 day cycle. So the extra cycle(18 frames) next 2 cycles 18 vs 12= 6 difference twice equals 30 frames of more brood. 30 frames of brood = 60 frames of bees. Which is why you HAVE to more than double their space with supering in order to keep them from wanting to swarm.
    Problem becomes equipment, mathematically impossible to have enough supers to contain every hive unless you borrowed supers. Anything you don't super gets split again. If you don't have equipment for splits, you forced to sell bees.

    The earlier brood cycle is all workers, drones brood isn't started till fresh pollen comes in. Bees are totally out jumping mites. Plus I suspect to cold for mites, average daily temp around that time is 33.1f according to past 5 year utility bill. Mitesneed the drone brood to be most prolific. Worker brood mites can only get 1 mature female out vs 4 in drone brood.
    Any hive that gets split, gets turned into 3-4 splits. So again mite cycle broke. Then add you don't buy bees in 7 years. No new mite genetics coming in. Anyone around me with bees, has gotten splits or queens from me.
    Since splits are done as early as possible, weaker hives are split. NOT the strongest hives. Strongest hives are the ones producing the drones first, not the weaker ones. After a period of time your genetically increasing everything.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Fort Walton Beach, Florida
    Posts
    1,250

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Tim, do you raise your queens, or let your splits make their own?

  7. #47
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    North Liberty, IN
    Posts
    339

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Quote Originally Posted by rhaldridge View Post
    Tim, do you raise your queens, or let your splits make their own?
    Keeping them crowded, they make up their own. Just a matter of timing on making splits then. If all hives are fairly equal, all are close on making the swarm cells up. They're naturally doing so on their own and not stressed.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    North Liberty, IN
    Posts
    339

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Queens are averaging around 5 years. If a queen fails to drop down in hyper-lay mode in late Feb. High probability she'll get superceded. I'll take boxes away and cull out old frames at this time. Add new boxes back when needed. I coukd easily requeen with sonething else. But then your eliminating multi-year survivor genetics.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    1,973

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Ives View Post
    My FB page pics explains a lot....
    I went through all the pics and videos I could find. I got:

    • No treatments
    • No sugar
    • 3 Deeps for brood nest and wintering
    • No Treatments
    • Swarms and cut-outs

    Is that pretty much it?

    Adam

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Fort Walton Beach, Florida
    Posts
    1,250

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Tim, could you expand a little on your approach to rotating out frames? How long do your frames stay in service? Do you only rotate out brood frames or do you also cull honey frames?

  11. #51
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    North Liberty, IN
    Posts
    339

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Adam, pretty much as simple as that..

    Ray, I just cull brood frames whenever a hive supercede queen. The only chemicals that would be building up is from Ag usage. I know I have a few hives brood boxes untouched from 07'. I just super them up each year.

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    5,720

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Tim. Start a Tim Ives thread. Posting pics and videos is easy.

    I checked out your FB page, great pics, but it wasn't as useful to me as a Beesource thread would be. Here you'll get questioned by all comers and the end result is a total understanding of your methods.
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

  13. #53
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    North Liberty, IN
    Posts
    339

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldtimer View Post
    Tim. Start a Tim Ives thread. Posting pics and videos is easy.

    I checked out your FB page, great pics, but it wasn't as useful to me as a Beesource thread would be. Here you'll get questioned by all comers and the end result is a total understanding of your methods.

    I have no control eliminating negative people on here. FB I don't have to deal with them. Delete....

  14. #54
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,277

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Ives View Post
    Queens are averaging around 5 years.
    that's amazing tim, especially given the amount of brood they are making in your triple deeps.

    are your queens marked and color coded for the year?
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  15. #55
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    North Liberty, IN
    Posts
    339

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Quote Originally Posted by squarepeg View Post
    that's amazing tim, especially given the amount of brood they are making in your triple deeps.

    are your queens marked and color coded for the year?
    Yes a lot are marked. New splits when checking for laying queen, is when I'll take the time to mark. Marked queens that swarm I'll double mark.

  16. #56
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Young County, Tx
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Tim, you may have addressed this in prior posts, but what if any foundation are you using? Are your hives regressed to small cell?
    I've got 9 hives, 4 of which are in 3-4 deeps. Trying to get recent swarm catches and this spring's splits built up into 2-3 deep before winter.
    All on small cell full sheets or starter strips.

  17. #57
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    North Liberty, IN
    Posts
    339

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Quote Originally Posted by wissler View Post
    Tim, you may have addressed this in prior posts, but what if any foundation are you using? Are your hives regressed to small cell?
    I've got 9 hives, 4 of which are in 3-4 deeps. Trying to get recent swarm catches and this spring's splits built up into 2-3 deep before winter.
    All on small cell full sheets or starter strips.
    I started off on wax foundation. I like using wood frame/plastic the best. I've been hoarding all my wax which I was going to get rendered into foundation. But you don't get your wax back do so. I know my wax is pure, I don't want unknown wax.
    I reapply my wax to plastic.

    I don't use 4.9, don't kniw anyone around here that does.

  18. #58
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Loup City, NE
    Posts
    152

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Tim- Thanks for taking your valuable time to educate people!

  19. #59
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Young County, Tx
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Thanks Tim. Good thoughts and now you've got me rethinking even the use of starter strips. Plastic would help with the extracting and support issues using my own wax. I'm still building up here in N. Tx. The bees here don't seem to mind the SC. The last package I bought in 2011 had a few problems drawing it out, but noticed the swarms and splits now seem to draw it out just fine. Just starting out I figured more bees per frame, strong hives (not single deeps) equal less problems with pests and over wintering. So far it seems to be working.

  20. #60
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Otero County, New Mexico, USA
    Posts
    1,372

    Default Re: Sustaining Treatment Free - How Many Colonies Do You Need?

    Tim's method is interesting. Sounds like a great system. One of these days I hope to be as sucessful.

    I have had pretty good luck, but don't do anything particularly special in my opinion and not sure my efforts would be worth emulating.
    I have been more or less treatment free from the start - four/five years back. The only real "treatment" you could say I do is using cedar wood/juniper for my smoke smoke and adding a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar to winter feed.

    I started with two carniolan hives about 5 years ago. A bear got one, the other went laying worker. I gave up on the domestic bees (too expensive to replace), so I started catching swarms and doing removals. The very first hive I ever cut out and brought home is still going strong to this day. No feeding/ no treating - nada. Strong as an ox and make a ton of honey. I have twenty one other hives at this point, most of which are either splits off my original hives or other removals I have done. I usually requeen my removals with a variety of open mated queen I have been raising here in the mountains or use a locally derived queen from other producers in the region (though I did inherit 4 hives of Beeweavers). In summary, most of my bees would be considered feral hybrids or survivor bees.

    My oldest queen is three and 1/2 years. I use her to breed most of my replacement queens - open mated with the locals at 7000' here in the mountains. Sort of a dark strain with a lot of russian/carnie influence and open mated with the ferals in my region. Very mite resistant in my opinion, as I have watched them groom mites from each other. They are pretty similar to carnies in most other respects. I also have some local Italians/Cordovans I use mostly in the desert. The jury is still out on them, and the Beeweavers (that I got in a trade).

    I also keep the local feral hives I remove if they do not show African traits. Like I mentioned before, my first is still going strong after all these years with very little feed or anything else other than swarm control. they can be a little fiesty, but they are good and hardy bees. I have three others but none are as old, mostly because they are still getting established.

    I have only ever lost 1 hive outright (due to freeze-out/dead queen) except for bears, and mites do not seem to be an issue at all. I have just reached the point where I have enough mature hives to actually make a decent honey crop.

    My basic model has been to split my non-producing hives into nucs to restart the operation for the next season. I always have nuclues hives waiting in the wings to make up the next seasons producing hives. I also have incoming removals (if they have decent traits) to make up for lack of diversity in genetic pool. My hives don't seem to get productive until the second season, then after that I have noticed they drop a bit and I usually split them up.

    I was using double deeps and recently switched to single deeps with a medium super since they usually only fill half a top deep with brood and the rest honey. They seem to swarm less and I get better honey off the deep and a half set-up. You can overwinter here with a single deep if you are careful. I also run foundationless hives. I have a few that use wax starter strips, but most are simply wedges turned sideways. When I first started, I got small cell PF-105 plastic frames, but the bees hate them and I have largely replaced them in my hives with other frames. Now, I DO run wooden framed Rite-Cell frames in some of my honey supers. I also run foundationless for cut comb. the Rite Cell is mostly to get them to move up or keep the comb straight.

    Like I said, nothing special, just a lot of splitting and nuc making with survivor type bees. Works for me - but then again, mites are not a huge issue here in New Mexico nor are small hive beetles and the usual bee pests. our biggest issues are the dry heat, varmints, lack of water, and lack of forage for bees. We can't run as many hives as elsewhere unless you want to migrate your bees with the ag crops - which I do not do. I mostly leave them in the mesquite down in the desert.
    Last edited by Paul McCarty; 07-19-2013 at 01:09 PM.
    NM desert/mountain beekeeper - Black Mesa Honeybees.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads