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Thread: Our log hive.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Quincy, Illinois, USA
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    276

    Default Our log hive.

    This is the log hive given to us to use in the paper combine trick to our weak hive. It didn't work. After 4 days I took them apart. I discovered hundreds of dead bees on the floor of the inside of this log. I don't know if they had died while trapped in there with screen wire, or were already there. Regardless, they've been very busy and working hard to maintain, and then perhaps grow somewhat. The hole is large enough to see inside and see their comb hanging from the inside top. I've seen wax moth larvae and moths on the floor of this log being chased by bees. I've seen them Festooning across the front, measuring where to go next. It's fascinating to see them in a more 'natural' environment. Tonight they almost have the front entrance plugged with what they are working on. I guess the current thought is to let them do what they do, and perhaps use them as a source for bees when they go to swarm.

    Festooning across the front (I think that's what it's called)



    Here's where they were a couple weeks ago


    Paper transfer that failed

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,536

    Default Re: Our log hive.

    Why he paper?
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Quincy, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    276

    Default Re: Our log hive.

    Quote Originally Posted by honeyman46408 View Post
    Why he paper?
    The log top has a sheet of plywood nailed onto it. I drilled a 2.25" hole in the center of that. The bottom board is attached to the plywood top, and I drilled a hole through it that lined up with the hole in the plywood. Since these were two different hives, one with queen, one suspected without, we decided to go with the "newspaper combine" which lets the bees chew through a layer of newspaper which separates them. I put down a layer of newspaper before affixing the bottom board onto the plywood. I believe the theory is that they are aware of one another, smell the queens pheromone and then attempt to combine. Since they are familiar, there is less fighting.
    After 4 days they did not chew through the paper and mix. Basically trying to combine two weak hives.
    Today both are making their way back to strength, and both have a queen.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Kingsville, OH
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    959

    Default Re: Our log hive.

    Do you still have the Hive in a Log?? I have three, but I am doing trap outs on them. One I put a supper on. Still a work in progress.
    I have one hived ( from the trap out doing great).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Quincy, Illinois, USA
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    276

    Default Re: Our log hive.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Franklin View Post
    Do you still have the Hive in a Log?? I have three, but I am doing trap outs on them. One I put a supper on. Still a work in progress.
    I have one hived ( from the trap out doing great).
    Sounds like you're doing alright. We talked of trap-out, but thought it'd take too long. How did you do yours and how long did it take? Saw a vid of some guys pumping smoke into the bottom of the hive (log), and flowing a bed sheet into a nearby hive up top. they also drummed on the log. The bees marched right into the box.

    Yes, it's still in there. We just discussed this evening putting the box back on top to allow them to move up into it. I'd put a box on with frames with foundation. I have one frame with a little comb on it. Any ideas on how to draw them up into the box voluntarily?
    Just worried about them in winter. My thought is that since the rest of the tree is gone, which would have given them some protection, they won't make it in this little log. The hole on top has some comb drawn across it. There is a path, but will the colony move? Most importantly will the queen move? Lately they're getting stronger and healthier. I used to be able to see the layers of comb when I looked in the hole. Now all I can see is bees on the comb. They're also building more.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Kingsville, OH
    Posts
    959

    Default Re: Our log hive.

    It took about 2 weeks, and now I am letting them rebuild in the log.
    I put a tube in the entrance, and covered the rest with other material. Then after a few days I put a frame of brood in the bait box and a few days latter I put the funnel on. It does take time.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Quincy, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    276

    Default Re: Our log hive.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Franklin View Post
    It took about 2 weeks, and now I am letting them rebuild in the log.
    I put a tube in the entrance, and covered the rest with other material. Then after a few days I put a frame of brood in the bait box and a few days latter I put the funnel on. It does take time.
    Thanks. Did you get the queen in your trap-outs? Most trap-outs I've read about, the queen is left behind. I don't want that end result.
    I'm leaning toward providing the box on top, and luring them up, and then drilling a hole in the bottom and smoking stragglers and others up maybe at the end of a two week period.

    We also have the "last resort" method of literally splitting the log in half, and physically removing them. I can do a slow motion log split using wedges and a sledge hammer. The log looks old, and is pitted and showing degradation.

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