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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Houston, Texas, USA
    Posts
    460

    Default Foundationless in an extractor?

    I just finished my first harvest, 65 lbs. from 2 hives, doing the crush and strain method. Due to some theft issues I sold all of my hunting lease equipment and will have the money to buy an extractor by the end of this week (Maxant 3100P). Anyway I currently have several hundred Walter Kelley type F frames I have been "stringing" with 20 lb. mono fishing line. For the most part, frames, I see no issue but some of my frames had very little attachment on the bottom bar and/or sides and am concerned about "blowouts" while power extracting.
    Comments/recommendations would be appreciated. As a reference I now have 6 hives, 10 frame boxes, so that is why I am going to a power extractor.
    Thanks in advance.
    Mike
    N5RWH - 9a

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Bayboro,NC,USA
    Posts
    242

    Default Re: Foundationless in an extractor?

    I do it all the time. You just have to start slow and build up speed gradually. The "string/wire" will hold the comb in place. You may have a few blow outs but that may be do to the bees chewing the string/monofilament into underneath the comb and you not detecting it until the comb blows out.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    killen,al
    Posts
    201

    Default Re: Foundationless in an extractor?

    Quote Originally Posted by dadandsonsbees View Post
    I do it all the time. You just have to start slow and build up speed gradually. The "string/wire" will hold the comb in place. You may have a few blow outs but that may be do to the bees chewing the string/monofilament into underneath the comb and you not detecting it until the comb blows out.
    I went to no foundation this year with 50 lb fishing line tight across the frames. The blood frames or working fine,but the super mediums are not so good. The bees are starting two different combs,one to each side,and when they meet in the middle of the frame one comb will over lap the other. It would be impossible to extract this . Also as I move the frames apart,they are stuck together so I will have to crush these frames to extract the honey.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Default Re: Foundationless in an extractor?

    >I do it all the time. You just have to start slow and build up speed gradually.

    I do as well and I use no wires or fishing line. All mediums. The two things to watch for:

    You need at least SOME attachment on all four sides
    New, white comb is very soft and makes better comb honey. If the comb has a yellow tint to it, the bees have "finished" it and it is much tougher.

    Here's a typical foundationless comb ready to harvest:

    http://bushfarms.com/images/FoundationlessDrawn.JPG

    Note, it is yellowish in color (not bright white) and it is attached SOME on all four sides.

    And, of course, as mentioned, start slow. When it's about half empty you can pick up some speed. When it's mostly empty you can crank it...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Sebago Maine USA
    Posts
    114

    Default Re: Foundationless in an extractor?

    I use 1/4" stainless mesh, like hardware cloth the size of the frame and rubber band it on and you can spin as fast as you want .

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
    Posts
    2,644

    Default Re: Foundationless in an extractor?

    Quote Originally Posted by naturaledge View Post
    I use 1/4" stainless mesh, like hardware cloth the size of the frame and rubber band it on and you can spin as fast as you want .
    very interesting idea!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Houston, Texas, USA
    Posts
    460

    Default Re: Foundationless in an extractor?

    Quote Originally Posted by dphillipm View Post
    I went to no foundation this year with 50 lb fishing line tight across the frames. The blood frames or working fine,but the super mediums are not so good. The bees are starting two different combs,one to each side,and when they meet in the middle of the frame one comb will over lap the other. It would be impossible to extract this . Also as I move the frames apart,they are stuck together so I will have to crush these frames to extract the honey.
    I have seen a couple of examples of this in my hives too. Some I took care of in the hive before harvest and others I think I will just have to deal with.
    This harvest I did not have any of the mono fishing line that the bees chewed through, but yes that could be a surprise problem.

    Michael, as always your sage advice is greatly appreciated and thank you for your time.

    Naturaledge, very interesting idea and I may use for my suspected "at risk" frames. I will keep an eye out for the SS mesh, but I also have a 10' roll of 1/8" galvanized "hardware cloth" that I used for bottom boards that I may use.

    Everyone thank you for your time and insights it was greatly appreciated!
    Mike
    N5RWH - 9a

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