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  1. #641
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    Feb 2010
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    New York City, NY
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    4,317

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    Do you mean gene flow? Or, do you mean ordering bees from Texas?

    Regardless, it's happening.

  2. #642
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Jefferson Co, TX
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    600

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    I guess I am missing the utube links for this amazing hives. Is it in this long thread or on facebook.

    If on facebook, could someone post the link for me.

    I do not go on facebook, too many folks might locate me that way.

    lol

    Thanks

  3. #643
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    Sep 2005
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    Greensboro, North Carolina
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    2,721

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    how many people do you think would believe that
    Believe what randy wrote?

    Why should I care?

  4. #644
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Manitoba Canada
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    5,864

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    Quote Originally Posted by Specialkayme View Post
    Believe what randy wrote?

    Why should I care?

    no you miss understood me,

    how many people do you think would believe that when sending a fall time double and a single into winter, they typically come out the same in spring
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  5. #645
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    Dec 2008
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    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
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    2,674

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    WLC, I finally got off the flour from laughing. AHB genes do NOT survive up here. Ussually dead around the first good freeze, don't know how to "cuddle". Game over. Please try again.

    Ian, I believe. We have been wintering in singles for as long as we know, at least the 1920's.

    Crazy Roland

  6. #646
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    Jan 2003
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    Manitoba Canada
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    5,864

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    Quote Originally Posted by Roland View Post
    WLC, I finally got off the flour from laughing. AHB genes do NOT survive up here. Ussually dead around the first good freeze, don't know how to "cuddle". Game over. Please try again.

    Ian, I believe. We have been wintering in singles for as long as we know, at least the 1920's.

    Crazy Roland
    ya , Im told AHB do not cluster and because of that they freeze

    Roland, I have totally switched to single management now. I love it for so many reasons. The increased efficacy of our in hive mite treatments is probably its biggest advantage currently
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  7. #647
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Weeki Wachee, Florida,USA
    Posts
    1,960

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    This thread took a strange twist!

    If I could keep bees as well as some of these beekeepers that claim to consistently outperform conventional commercial beekeepers I would set up a program to educate. I'm sure if I could consistently out perform by a factor of 3x or more and show people how to take that knowledge home and repeat that kind of success with thier own hives I'd have a line out the door. I'm sure lots of beekeepers would pay $1000.00 a week and work thier butts off to learn it.If and that's a big if they trusted that it was of value.

    I wonder how often commercial beekeepers try radically different methods and experiment with totally new concepts? I'm sure many would love to stop feeding, moving, treating etc. (all the things that some claim to eliminate). I bet they experiment a lot pouring resources into self education.

    The above comment isn't pointed at anyone directly.

  8. #648
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    Sep 2005
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    Greensboro, North Carolina
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    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post

    how many people do you think would believe that when sending a fall time double and a single into winter, they typically come out the same in spring
    Oh, haha.

    Probably very little. I thought it was surprising when I read Randy's article, and the findings even went against what he thought would happen.

    It was very shocking to see that they all equalized to 10 frames, whether they started with 6 or 18 (the fact that the six GREW to 10 frames over winter was particularly surprising).

  9. #649
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    Sep 2005
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    Greensboro, North Carolina
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    2,721

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    Quote Originally Posted by Roland View Post
    I finally got off the flour from laughing.

    Crazy Roland
    Why were you lying on flour? Is that a common thing to do when laughing in Wis? I would have guessed it would be cheese, not flour. lol

  10. #650
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,794

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    Can't forget location is key. I could never super a hive like that, the bees would not have enough natural nectar to even draw that much wax let alone fill them with honey.

  11. #651
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New York City, NY
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    4,317

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    There are plenty of African genetics that can be found in ferals. That doesn't mean that they are actual Brazilian AHB, just that they carry some genetics from AHB derived hybrids.

    Roland, I take it that you don't follow what Paul McCarty is studying.

    Besides, I've got some AHB genetics in my BeeWeavers right here in NYC.

  12. #652
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    26,791

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    no you miss understood me,

    how many people do you think would believe that when sending a fall time double and a single into winter, they typically come out the same in spring
    I don't see why that couldn't happen. Just because there are two boxes doesn't mean one is twice what the other is.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  13. #653
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    26,791

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    Quote Originally Posted by Mbeck View Post
    This thread took a strange twist!

    If I could keep bees as well as some of these beekeepers that claim to consistently outperform conventional commercial beekeepers I would set up a program to educate. I'm sure if I could consistently out perform by a factor of 3x or more and show people how to take that knowledge home and repeat that kind of success with thier own hives I'd have a line out the door. I'm sure lots of beekeepers would pay $1000.00 a week and work thier butts off to learn it.If and that's a big if they trusted that it was of value.

    I wonder how often commercial beekeepers try radically different methods and experiment with totally new concepts? I'm sure many would love to stop feeding, moving, treating etc. (all the things that some claim to eliminate). I bet they experiment a lot pouring resources into self education.

    The above comment isn't pointed at anyone directly.
    Tim better keep his apiary locations Top Secret. As much as management, Location, Location, Location is key.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  14. #654
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Cheyenne, Wyoming, USA
    Posts
    1,693

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    I don't see why that couldn't happen. Just because there are two boxes doesn't mean one is twice what the other is.
    Correct. I have experimented quite a bit with wintering singles vs doubles, with or with out wrapping, etc. And there is alway a deep of bees and some leftover honey and pollen. I have concluded that I will winter in singles for the most part from now on.

  15. #655
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    North Liberty, IN
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    339

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Tim better keep his apiary locations Top Secret. As much as management, Location, Location, Location is key.
    Lol... Pick the nearest cornfield, PLENTY of them around as Randy pointed out in July12' ABJ.

  16. #656
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Grey County, ON, Canada
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    101

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    I do not add a chamber to my hive arrangement. I manage my hives in singles for most of the year, except for a few weeks I let the queen wander into the second chamber (1st super) to lay until I shake her back down and add an excluder as I prepare for the honey pull.
    Interesting... How do you get her down below an excluder after you let her up, fume boards or a blower?

  17. #657
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    Jan 2003
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    Manitoba Canada
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    5,864

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    shake
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  18. #658
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    Dec 2008
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    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
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    2,674

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    WLC wrote:

    Roland, I take it that you don't follow what Paul McCarty is studying.

    True that!!!!! I hardly believe that anything being studied genetically in Southern NM has any relevance in Wisconsin. You do realize Wisconsin is not next to New Mexico?

    SpecialK- When you are known for Beer, you never know who or what is on the flour/floor.

    Crazy Roland

  19. #659
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    Feb 2010
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    New York City, NY
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    4,317

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    Quote Originally Posted by Roland View Post
    WLC wrote:Roland, I take it that you don't follow what Paul McCarty is studying.
    True that!!!!! I hardly believe that anything being studied genetically in Southern NM has any relevance in Wisconsin. You do realize Wisconsin is not next to New Mexico?
    It's really about the very mixed genetics of the resistant ferals. For example, there's Russian genetics in there as well. Which genetics the resistant ferals of Wisconsin might one day prove to have is going to be an interesting story.

    Regardless, this is about how someone like Tim has started a different kind of commercial operation.

    Sustainable permaculture in a commercial operation is a worthwhile goal, and I don't think that there's any real disagreement on that regard.

    From ABJ:

    "The first discovery of Varroa jacobsoni (later renamed Varroa destructor) in the United States was made on Sept. 25, 1987 in Florida on colonies owned by a Wisconsin beekeeper. This beekeeper, Gary Oreskovic, was a supplier of package bees that were combined with packages from other beekeepers and sold to companies and individuals in Wisconsin."

    Roland, since Wisconsin was the epicenter of the original Varroa outbreak, it stands to reason that Wisconsin is home the first feral colonies to develop resistance.
    Last edited by WLC; 09-13-2013 at 04:50 AM.

  20. #660
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Grey County, ON, Canada
    Posts
    101

    Default Re: I would like to be a commercial beek

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    shake
    So do you just knock each brood frame individually into the chamber below until you see her then? Seems like a lot of work but there must be a measurable benefit if you're doing it.

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