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  1. #1
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    Default Transient Exposure to Low Levels of Insecticide

    Transient Exposure to Low Levels of Insecticide Affects Metabolic Networks of Honeybee Larvae
    Given the changes we observe at the RNA and lipid level, it is reasonable so suspect that the synthetic neonicotinoid-class of insecticides are a factor driving the global decline of pollinating insects. We find evidence that dietary traces of the insecticide imidacloprid impacts physiology of larvae from bee colonies located in a typical British agricultural landscape. The genomic response to this novel environmental stressor mainly affects energy metabolism pathways. Downregulation of sugar metabolism in response to neonicotinoids could, for example, impact start and duration of foraging [61], [62] and impair flight performance as flight muscles work at very high glycolytic rates [63], [64]. In fact, it has already been observed that treatment of adult honey bees with imidacloprid can impair foraging and result in delayed return flights and an increase in the number of bees not returning from foraging [65].
    http://www.plosone.org/article/info%...l.pone.0068191
    americasbeekeeper.com
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Transient Exposure to Low Levels of Insecticide

    Simply earth shaking! Purposefully feeding bees imidacloprid is harmful to bees!

    Over a period of 15 days, we provided syrup tainted with low levels (2 µg/L−1) of the neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid to beehives located in the field.

    Yaaaaaawn! Tell us something we don't know.
    Honey Badger Don't Care ಠ_ಠ ~=[,,_,,]:3

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Transient Exposure to Low Levels of Insecticide

    How would you propose the study be done then?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nabber86 View Post
    Simply earth shaking! Purposefully feeding bees imidacloprid is harmful to bees!




    Yaaaaaawn! Tell us something we don't know.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Transient Exposure to Low Levels of Insecticide

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDawg View Post
    How would you propose the study be done then?
    Uh, don't feed poison to bees because it poisons bees, and then report the obvious results that bees die when they are poisoned.

    Maybe this will help you: http://mlkshk.com/p/2KNX

    It's a slow GIF file, but try to focus your attention for a moment and let it sink in.
    Last edited by Nabber86; 07-03-2013 at 09:32 PM.
    Honey Badger Don't Care ಠ_ಠ ~=[,,_,,]:3

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Transient Exposure to Low Levels of Insecticide

    >Simply earth shaking! Purposefully feeding bees imidacloprid is harmful to bees!

    I think the point of the study is that when it does not kill them it has long term effects that are detrimental. Usually studies on effects of insecticides on bees only measure how many bees die...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Transient Exposure to Low Levels of Insecticide

    Exactly, chemical companies only have to report how much will kill pollinators - LD50. Current research is to determine how little kills or negatively impacts bees. Goal being to require chemical companies to report the same!
    americasbeekeeper.com
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  7. #7
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    Default Re: Transient Exposure to Low Levels of Insecticide

    Quote Originally Posted by AmericasBeekeeper View Post
    Exactly, chemical companies only have to report how much will kill pollinators - LD50. Current research is to determine how little kills or negatively impacts bees. Goal being to require chemical companies to report the same!
    Stating that “chemical companies only have to report how much will kill pollinators - LD50” is meaningless because 50 percent of the bees also live at the LD50 level. Even at LD99, 1 percent of the bees live.

    LD50 is the dose that kills 50 percent of the bees in an experiment, just as LD40 is the dose the kills 40 percent of the bees, LD30 is the dose the kills 30 percent of the bees, and so on. These would be acute doses and can be derived, usually, from the same data set. Data points are plotted at several LDs along the way and an equation can be developed to determine all values from LD1 to LD99. LD50 just happens to be the standard reporting level.

    Terms like “sub-lethal” are also meaningless. At LD50, 50 percent of the bees die and 50 percent of the bees live in an experiment. Which term is applicable (lethal vs sub-lethal) depends on if you are a live or dead bee.
    Honey Badger Don't Care ಠ_ಠ ~=[,,_,,]:3

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Transient Exposure to Low Levels of Insecticide

    The question here, however, is not how many die, but how are the ones that survive affected.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Transient Exposure to Low Levels of Insecticide

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    The question here, however, is not how many die, but how are the ones that survive affected.
    Agreed. I am glad you caught that.

    However, I was addressing (in my last post) ABeeks false accusation based on a misunderstanding of toxicology.
    Honey Badger Don't Care ಠ_ಠ ~=[,,_,,]:3

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Transient Exposure to Low Levels of Insecticide

    Yes, but what happens in the "real" world?

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Transient Exposure to Low Levels of Insecticide

    Quote Originally Posted by hilreal View Post
    Yes, but what happens in the "real" world?
    Varying amounts of bees die, experience negative effects, or other effects that are not negative, according to dose. If bees in the real world are not exposed to these various levels (no completed pathway of exposure), nothing happens.
    Honey Badger Don't Care ಠ_ಠ ~=[,,_,,]:3

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Transient Exposure to Low Levels of Insecticide

    I am quite sure if I fed my children baby food laced with sub lethal amounts of toxins I could show some ill affects. The fact that feeding bees insecticide causes an affect should not be surprising. So the real question is what is the real world exposure to complete the pathway of exposure. According to Randy Oliver's post in ABJ this month, the risk is pretty small for most of us (nearly all of my hives are within a stones throw of commercial corn/bean operations and are doing quite well, thank you).

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