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Thread: soybeans

  1. #1
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    Henry County, VA
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    Default soybeans

    do honey bees get much nector out of soybeea blooms

  2. #2
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    Feb 2012
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    East Peoria, IL
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    Default Re: soybeans

    Depends on the variety. Late season beans seem to do better.

  3. #3
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    May 2007
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    Shawnee, OK
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    Default Re: soybeans

    Quote Originally Posted by DLMKA View Post
    Depends on the variety. Late season beans seem to do better.
    When there is a dearth, after a flow, bees do work soy fields, usually in the afternoon when the soy starts to bloom, but the honey quality is third-rate in my view: white sweet clover, alfalfa, and soy, perhaps.

  4. #4
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    Aug 2011
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    KC, MO, USA
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    Default Re: soybeans

    >Depends on the variety.

    Most everyone plants round up ready beens, atleast around here.

    Do they produce nectar?

    Would it be worth it to move bees to a soy bean field during a dearth?

  5. #5
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    May 2011
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    Kingsville, OH
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    959

    Default Re: soybeans

    depending on how many acres and how far away the fields are. If there was nothing else to feed the bees I would move my hive no more then 20 to 30 miles.

  6. #6
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    Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA
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    Default Re: soybeans

    My bees do very well on soybeans and its a long blooming season because of the different planting times. I don't know what pure soybean honey would taste like, mine is mixed in with clover and a little alfalfa, but the resulting honey is excellent tasting. John

  7. #7
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    Jul 2012
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    Jackson, MO
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    Default Re: soybeans

    Alot of keepers around here depend on it for winter storage, it helps the bees stock up for the winter and helps the farmers.

  8. #8
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    Jul 2011
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    Evansville, IN
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    Default Re: soybeans

    Soybean honey is quite variable. Some varieties produce quite a bit of good nectar when the weather is right, but the current fashion is to breed nectarless soybeans (they are self fertile) to avoid feeding army worm moths in some areas -- hardly smart to put out a feast for moths that are going to lay a gazillion army worm eggs in your crop just in time to defoliate it when the beans should be setting. And some varieties don't produce much no matter what the weather is, and those that do make nice nectar sometimes don't the the weather is right. Seems to be a Central Illinois and north phenomenon so far as I can tell.

    Roundup ready is another issue, and does not affect the nectar production on it's own.

    I have gotten quite a nice crop of honey from soybeans, although the Italian queen didn't shut down later and they ate it all making un-needed brood, but I'm hoping the 600 acres or so in the immediate area do the same this year.

    Peter

  9. #9
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    Jan 2013
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    Browns, Illinois, USA
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    Default Re: soybeans

    As a farmer I have read quite a few articles on the impact bees can have on soybeans. It seems that they have had a nice increase in yields in a few limited trials. I hope in the near future to be able to corroborate this fact for myself and hope to benefit from the thousands and thousands of acres of soybeans that surround me every year. Hope that if the honey isn't quite as good that the clover will improve it's taste.
    As Grandma says "Fool me once shame on you, fool me twice shame on me"

  10. #10
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    Jun 2011
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    Portland, Oregon
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    Default Re: soybeans

    Inasmuch as over 85% of soybeans planted in the United States are genetically modified, I'm sure I wouldn't want my bees feeding on soy nectar.

    And I certainly wouldn't consider the resulting honey safe or fit for human consumption!

    (I know the government says it's safe. But the government's been known to be prone to lying a bit of late...)

  11. #11
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    Jan 2013
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    Browns, Illinois, USA
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    Default Re: soybeans

    Beregondo, I assume you are a treatment free, organic beekeeper then?

    In my part of the world there is no such thing as organic. Bean fields as far as the eye can see. Honey tastes great.
    As Grandma says "Fool me once shame on you, fool me twice shame on me"

  12. #12
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    Jun 2011
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    Portland, Oregon
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    Default Re: soybeans

    I'd expect it to taste good - -soybean honey generally does.

    I haven't yet found the need to treat my hives, and so far a business decision not to spend on inputs that aren't indicated has served me well.

    I'm not an organic beekeeper, but as noted, haven't needed to treat my hives.
    Last edited by Beregondo; 07-02-2013 at 09:46 PM. Reason: REmoved unkind remark concerning assumption

  13. #13
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    Default Re: soybeans

    I didnt mean anything by assuming the organic or treatment free. My apologies.

    A point I would try to make is that unless you are in place surrounded by thousands of acres of certified organic crops, flowers, trees, etc. Then your bees have been on some form of GMO plants or been in contact with some kind of chemical.

    "(I know the government says it's safe. But the government's been known to be prone to lying a bit of late...)"
    This is true.
    As Grandma says "Fool me once shame on you, fool me twice shame on me"

  14. #14
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    Default Re: soybeans

    I have soybeans all around my hives. Never got a drop of nectar from them. Same with cotton....
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  15. #15
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    Default Re: soybeans

    Quote Originally Posted by Edaw View Post
    A point I would try to make is that unless you are in place surrounded by thousands of acres of certified organic crops, flowers, trees, etc. Then your bees have been on some form of GMO plants or been in contact with some kind of chemical.

    "(I know the government says it's safe. But the government's been known to be prone to lying a bit of late...)"
    This is true.
    Edaw, you caused no offense... the removed remark was a result of my own assumption and bias.

    I understand that there's probably not much else for bees to forage on in a community of big monocultures, whether the crop is corn, soybeans or almonds.

    My observation is that there is no proof yet of the safety of GM foods, and plenty of basis for reasonable suspicion that they're not safe.

    And I don't consider any food I suspect *might* be harmful as fit food for bee or man.

  16. #16
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    May 2013
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    Chardon, Ohio
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    Default Re: soybeans

    Bergondo said "My observation is that there is no proof yet of the safety of GM foods, and plenty of basis for reasonable suspicion that they're not safe."

    All foods are GMO. Take wheat for instance. Wheat is a man made species. There never was any such thing as a wild wheat plant as it was created by accident during early culture of a variety of grasses by man. In fact it is such a complex GMO product that man probably could not even make it in the lab.

    Or take cattle. A recent scientific study showed 30% of the DNA in cattle came directly from snakes. I mean directly from snakes. Not by genetic transmission from some common ancestor. So think about that the next time you eat a steak. You are eating one of natures very complex GMO products.

    Same type of thing is true of everything else we eat.

  17. #17
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    Greenville, TX, USA
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    Default Re: soybeans

    Quote Originally Posted by snl View Post
    I have soybeans all around my hives. Never got a drop of nectar from them. Same with cotton....
    Curious. How do you know? Around here both produce nectar.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: soybeans

    Quote Originally Posted by Ross View Post
    Curious. How do you know? Around here both produce nectar.
    Cause the supers are......well empty! I extracted prior to soy & cotton and put the supers back on. I'm in the middle of 40 plus acres of soy at the moment. The farmer rotates his crops between soy, cotton & corn & never anything from any of them (of course I know corn has no nectar). Wish it were not so. I keep hoping each year.
    http://OxaVap.com Your source for the Varrox OA Vaporizer,
    "One of the highest ranked" by R. Oliver

  19. #19
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    Aug 2005
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    Fort Wayne, IN
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    975

    Default Re: soybeans

    Quote Originally Posted by Beregondo View Post
    Edaw, you caused no offense... the removed remark was a result of my own assumption and bias.

    I understand that there's probably not much else for bees to forage on in a community of big monocultures, whether the crop is corn, soybeans or almonds.

    My observation is that there is no proof yet of the safety of GM foods, and plenty of basis for reasonable suspicion that they're not safe.

    And I don't consider any food I suspect *might* be harmful as fit food for bee or man.
    Quite the reverse is TRUE, despite milllions and millions of acres of GMO crops being planted around the world and consumed there has been no "proof yet" of a single animal suffering any ill effects. IF they could find one case, the greens would have been all over the news with it. I think that is pretty good "proof" myself.

  20. #20
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    Jan 2006
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    Lee\'s Summit, MO
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    Default Re: soybeans

    I've gotten great flows out of soybeans one year and poor performance the next. Not 100% sure the cause but if the beans are planted mid June, it's REALLY hot, and there's some moderate rainfall the soybeans will produce some nectar in harvestable amounts. If any of those 3 are off you get nothing. I always prepare for it by putting supers on, but I never count on it.
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