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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Provo, UT, US
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: 37 million bees dead

    Quote Originally Posted by ArtSmart View Post
    OK Pontius Pilate. The truth will set you free. I'm sure, sooner or later they will figure out exact mechanism how this particular poison kills bees. They will pat each other on the back and write a paper about it. Meanwhile most of the people came to the same conclusion years before. How did those uneducated unenlightened peasants managed to figure something out that takes scientists decades to figure out? It is called experience. Meanwhile true scientific minds will keep using poison and muse: "How come all the bees are dying?". I think it is Einstein who gave definition of insanity as: "doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results."
    Oh, it is proven that it kills bees, but the question is whether it causes CCD.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Sacramento, Calif. USA
    Posts
    267

    Default Re: 37 million bees dead

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDawg View Post
    Also, in regards to the possibility that the bees were poisoned by the Linden trees themselves: "Linden trees can also be toxic to bees under some circumstances, according to both Preston and Black. But Black said that toxicity is very unusual, and typically occurs in drought conditions when the tree's nectar is concentrated.
    After months of investigation the Oregon Dept of Agriculture has concluded the NATURAL toxicity of European Linden Trees is thought to have contributed to the bumblebee deaths in June 2013.
    See: http://www.oregon.gov/ODA/Pages/news..._measures.aspx "It appears the tree species’ natural toxicity to bumblebees in combination with the pesticide contributed to the deaths."

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    2,606

    Default Re: 37 million bees dead

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueDiamond View Post
    After months of investigation the Oregon Dept of Agriculture has concluded the NATURAL toxicity of European Linden Trees is thought to have contributed to the bumblebee deaths in June 2013.
    See: http://www.oregon.gov/ODA/Pages/news..._measures.aspx "It appears the tree species’ natural toxicity to bumblebees in combination with the pesticide contributed to the deaths."
    Strange how the trees nectar was not toxic before they where sprayed. It would be interesting to know just how long the bees had been foraging on those trees and not dying from it before the spraying.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    San Mateo, Ca, USA
    Posts
    403

    Default Re: 37 million bees dead

    if you google you'll find lots of links on this. A number of lime / linden are toxic to bumbles but not honeybees. Some are toxic to both. Some produce good honey.

    http://www.buzzaboutbees.net/Which-L...-For-Bees.html

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    JACKSON CO MI
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: 37 million bees dead

    we all know that the pesticides are killing the bees we just have to keep informing people and spread the word on how deadly they are not only to the bees

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Otero County, New Mexico, USA
    Posts
    1,324

    Default Re: 37 million bees dead

    They are deadly to us too.
    NM desert/mountain beekeeper - Black Mesa Honeybees.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Evansville, IN
    Posts
    2,232

    Default Re: 37 million bees dead

    There are some legitimate concerns about neonics. First, they are chlorinated nicitinoids, which means, quite shockingly, that they are resistant to degradation in the soil. This was quite a surprise to Bayer (allegedly), but should not have been since the vast majority of chlorinated substances used for pesticides have been banned for just this reason. As a result, repeated use of neonics on seeds results in sustained levels in the soil that tend to rise annually.

    Second, the application to seed isn't targeted, it's "to enhance stand density", meaning it's used mostly to sell more of it without a definitive reason. This sort of scattershot application of pesticides shouldn't be tolerated under any circumstances, any more than "propholatic" use of antibiotics in overcrowded feedlots should be (far better to spread the animals out than create antibiotic resistant bacteria).

    Third, the dust from air seeding is a severe problem as it settles on the dandelions and other flowering weeds beside the fields, and the bees will be quite busy collecting the nectar and pollen from those plants. It's quite common to see a big dust cloud behind planters here regardless of the weather or soil conditions. Again, "preventative" use of pesticides shouldn't be allowed.

    Fourth, with corn in particular, there is a serious problem with neonics showing up in guttation droplets in cool damp weather. This is most common in new seedlings where there is a significant amount of neonic from the seed treatment in contact with the rootlets, but because neoics build up in the soil, can be a problem in larger plants as well. These droplets form by the plant transporting sugars into them to draw water up from the soil, and are highly attractive to bees. Given the right conditions, the concentration of neonics can be high enough to be directly toxic to the bees collecting them. This may not happen every year, but I think I saw some pesticide die-off about that time with my bees once. As the neonics build up in the soil, the amount excuded in guttation droplets will rise.

    Fifth, neonics are metabolized very quickly by bees, and may not persist long enough to be detected properly in dead bees, making it hard to determine directly if they were poisoned.

    I have a suspicion that pesticide usage is way out of control in the US -- sure, some of them are better than they were in the 50's and 60's, but we are using unbelievable amounts, and they cannot be good for bees. Fungicides are showing up as a serious problem because they prevent fermentation of pollen in the hive, with the result that the bees are not getting some vital sterols that they cannot synthesize. Around here, the local farmers apply fungicides by areal spray (stupid as 90% of the application goes somewhere besides the target) so you can assume the pollen all over is affected.

    Peter

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    2,606

    Default Re: 37 million bees dead

    Thank you for taking the time to post that Fred.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Bedford, Indiana
    Posts
    43

    Default Re: 37 million bees dead

    Good news is Bayer has a varroa control now. Its called neonicotinoid pesticides and it works for your bees as well.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    auburn, ca
    Posts
    23

    Default Re: 37 million bees dead

    you have got to be working in collusion with either Monsanto, the pesticide companies or one of their bought off affiliates. There are many studies verifying the existence of neonics in pollen.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    auburn, ca
    Posts
    23

    Default Re: 37 million bees dead

    How much did Monsanto, Bayer, and affiliates pay to get that one done? Sounds like the explanation for CCD cause....uhhhhh "its lost of food supply, poor beekeeper habits, varroa mites and maybe influenced by pesticides"

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