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  1. #81
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    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    Perhaps BigDawg is an ex smoker?

    Lol, nope--I'm a pack a day smoker: tobacco industry scientists have assured me that their product is safe! And they wouldn't lie to us......would they?

  2. #82
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    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    Quote Originally Posted by cerezha View Post
    it is important who wrote the article - some people have more credentials than other.
    So in this thread identity matters, but in this thread, identity doesn't matter! I'm confused!!!

    “Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind.” - Dr. Seuss
    Regards, Barry

  3. #83
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    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    Quote Originally Posted by cerezha View Post
    It is obvious (to me) - neonicotinoids as well as nicotinoids are basically derivatives of the nicotine. All of them utilize poisonous mechanism of the nicotine.
    and nicotine is a natural plant defense that evolved to protect against chomping insects.

  4. #84
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    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDawg View Post
    Lol, nope--I'm a pack a day smoker: tobacco industry scientists have assured me that their product is safe! And they wouldn't lie to us......would they?
    I don't know about that, but I know that people lie to themselves all the time.

    Those who bring forth the problem have to bring the solution too. What is your solution?
    Mark Berninghausen #youmatter

  5. #85
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    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    Perhaps BigDawg is an ex smoker?
    Tobacco is amusing story. This is an example how science finally after so much struggle succeed! It took decades to prove the connection between smoking and lung-cancer. Tobacco companies did everything possible to prevent science from conclusion. After that story, many scientist are very cynical regarding "unbiased" science in the big corporations. Neonics story look very similar to tobacco story... so many analogy ... when people debated tobacco endlessly, people were dying from lung-cancer.
    Серёжа, Sergey

  6. #86
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    eolia, lincoln county, mo.
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    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    So because the tobacco industry at one time denied the health effects of their product therefore all corporations and their employees lie. That said we should believe no one and yet everyone if they have views similar to ours. GOT IT!!!!

  7. #87
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    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    except neonics follow the original purpose of nicotine: to kill bugs

    Smoking insecticides into your body was a flawed idea to begin with.

  8. #88
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    Sacramento, Calif. USA
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    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDawg View Post
    From the Quartz article: "The findings break new ground on why large numbers of bees are dying"
    Actually, as far as I can tell the study just showed some fungicides impaired the bees' ability to fight off Nosema ceranae when the bees were FORCE FED field collected pollen samples containing fungicide.

    The ag chemical industry's position has been that force feeding does not demonstrate what effects ag chemicals have in full real life field situations. More importantly the study did not show that Nosema ceranae is more prevalent in areas of the country where fungicides are used heavily. With regard to CCD, some keepers on this forum like gmcharlie and Barry have said there's little to no CCD in Illinois despite the fact that around 60% of the entire landmass of Illinois (if you exclude Chicago) is covered with crops grown from neonic treated seed and despite some foliar applied (crop duster) fungicide applications in the summer.

  9. #89
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    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDawg View Post
    Lol, nope--I'm a pack a day smoker:
    Tell me your joking! Really?
    Regards, Barry

  10. #90
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    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    the trick I've heard with Nosema is that its hard to detect. You can't detect it by looking for brown spots at your hive entrance. It requires examining the contents of a bee's intestines with a 400x microscope.

    I think the article is poorly written. I can't see that the author really understands beekeeping to properly digest the findings of the study. Is it plausible that ingesting a fungicide could impair a bees bowel system enough to make an existing pest become a real problem? That's the 24k question here. It seems plausible to me, but I think there would need to be further study on the matter.

  11. #91
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    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    So in this thread identity matters, but in this thread, identity doesn't matter! I'm confused!!!
    I am not sure what you mean? If somebody publish a sci. article with name on it- it is public. The entire purpose of the published articles is to initiate a discussion, share the knowledge, propose new theory etc. It is all willingly made public. If somebody screw up - well, it is public! Non-disclosure of the conflict of interest is a big "crime" in scientific community (I believe in business too). A real scientist simply would not take such challenge, because it effectively destroys his/her career. In our professional social networks we are using real names, but those places operate with respect to human individuality and personal insults are not possible or person would be immediately removed from the network. Public networks are rough - it explains why many people prefer to use nicknames - it is so easy to insult when feel, you are safe under the umbrella of your nickname. Similarly, to people who was insulted - they do not want everyone know how they are bullied publicly It is all about decency and culture (if any) of communication. It seems to me, public networks loose this culture of respectful communication.
    Серёжа, Sergey

  12. #92
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    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    Quote Originally Posted by jeffnmo View Post
    ... That said we should believe no one and yet everyone if they have views similar to ours. GOT IT!!!!
    Tobacco companies, in my opinion, committed the crime and never were punished accordingly. The crime was - systematic purposely misrepresentation of the effects of tobacco smoke on human health. By intentionally doing that, yes, they lost credentials. It is up to every individual to decide in what to believe. Nobody limit you. Now, those tobacco "scientists" are still alive (not punished) and possible do "research" in another place - would you believe them?
    Серёжа, Sergey

  13. #93
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    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    Quote Originally Posted by BayHighlandBees View Post
    I think the article is poorly written. I can't see that the author really understands beekeeping to properly digest the findings of the study. Is it plausible that ingesting a fungicide could impair a bees bowel system enough to make an existing pest become a real problem? That's the 24k question here. It seems plausible to me, but I think there would need to be further study on the matter.
    The study's primary author, Jeffrey Pettis, has a PhD in Entomology and is currently the head scientist of the US Department of Agriculture's Bee Research Laboratory, so, I'm hoping he understands beekeeping pretty well.....

    I think the most important questions raised by the study are:

    1. "Thus published LD50 values (lethal dosage levels) may not accurately indicate pesticide toxicity inside a hive containing large numbers of pesticides."
    2. "Research looking at additive and synergistic effects between multiple pesticides is clearly needed."
    3. "Third, pesticides can have sub-lethal effects on development, reproduction, learning and memory, and foraging behavior."

  14. #94
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    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDawg View Post
    I think the most important questions raised by the study are:
    3. "Third, pesticides can have sub-lethal effects on development, reproduction, learning and memory, and foraging behavior." [/B]
    I'd insert: "3. pesticides FORCE FED to bees can have sub-lethal effects on development, reproduction, learning and memory, and foraging behavior."

    Just because Pettis has a PhD in entomology doesn't mean he ever had an upper division undergraduate or graduate school class in insect pathology (or both). Very few entomologists have had such training, hence the likely reason they tend to avoid in depth studies of insect viral, protozoan and fungal diseases and instead take the easy route to obtaining career enhancing peer reviewed papers: force feeding pesticides to bees and assessing the effects.

  15. #95
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    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueDiamond View Post
    I'd insert: "3. pesticides FORCE FED to bees can have sub-lethal effects on development, reproduction, learning and memory, and foraging behavior."
    Look, I know you're not happy with the study because yet another published paper highlights the unanticipated negative and cumulative impacts of pesticides upon non-target pollinators, but to dismiss the study outright only shows your bias and prejudice. Bees have to eat. They collected pollen from the wild as bees would do, and then fed them the pollen in a lab setting so they could monitor the results. They didn't hold their mouths open and force the pollen down their throats--it was the only food source available and so the bees ate it. The freely fed upon the pollen--they were NOT force fed....

    Tell us, what is YOUR recommended method for studying the issue? Where are YOUR published research results?

    You keep harping on the need for "real world, in the field studies" as if that's the only way to get valid data relative to the study of CCD. So, given that the neonics/CCD issue has been a major thorn in the side of the pesticide companies for over 7 years, tell me, where are THEIR long-term, real world, in the field studies demonstrating that their products are NOT contributing to CCD? Surely, they've conducted research like that, right? WHERE'S THE DATA?

    Just because Pettis has a PhD in entomology doesn't mean he ever had an upper division undergraduate or graduate school class in insect pathology (or both). Very few entomologists have had such training, hence the likely reason they tend to avoid in depth studies of insect viral, protozoan and fungal diseases and instead take the easy route to obtaining career enhancing peer reviewed papers: force feeding pesticides to bees and assessing the effects.
    Ummm, yeah. Well, call me crazy, but when it comes to who has more credibility--an insecticide salesman with a Bachelor's degree, or, the head of the USDA Bee Research Lab with a PhD in Entomology and dozens of published articles in peer-reviewed journals, well, that's an easy one.....

    List of publications by Jeffrey Pettis:

    A set of scientific issues being considered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency regarding pollinator risk assessment framework. Reprint Icon - (Government Publication) Jenkins, F., Berenbaum, M., Delcos, K., Fefferman, N., Hunt, G., James, R., Klaine, S., Mcmanaman, J., Ostiguy, N., Pettis, J., Pistorius, J., Potter, T.L., Sandy, M., Schwab, A., Schlenck, D., Tarpey, D. 2012. A set of scientific issues being considered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency regarding pollinator risk assessment framework. Government Publication/Report. Advisory Panel Meeting; 9/11-14/2012. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.

    Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Cornman, R.S., Tarpy, D., Chen, Y., Jeffries, L., Lopez, D.L., Pettis, J.S., Vanengelsdorp, D., Evans, J.D. 2012. Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies. PLoS Pathogens. 7(8):e43562.

    Effects of long distance transportation on honey bee physiology - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Ahn, K., Xie, X., Pettis, J.S., Huang, Z.Y. 2012. Effects of long distance transportation on honey bee physiology. Psyche. DOI:10.1155/2012/193029.

    Pesticide exposure in honey bees results in increased levels of the gut pathogen Nosema - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Pettis, J.S., Vanengelsdorp, D., Johnson, J., Divley, G. 2012. Pesticide exposure in honey bees results in increased levels of the gut pathogen Nosema. Naturwissenschaften. 99:153–158.

    Direct effect of acaricides on pathogen loads and gene expression levels of honey bee Apis mellifera - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Boncristiani, H., Underwood, R., Schwarz, R.S., Evans, J.D., Pettis, J.S., Vanengelsdorp, D. 2011. Direct effect of acaricides on pathogen loads and gene expression levels of honey bee Apis mellifera. Journal of Insect Physiology. 58:613-620.

    Varroa destructor: research avenues towards sustainable control - (Review Article)
    Dietemann, V., Pflugfelder, J., Anderson, D., Charriere, J., Chejanovsky, N., Dainat, B., De Miranda, J., Delaplane, K., Fuchs, S., Gallmann, P., Gauthier, L., Imdorf, A., Koeniger, N., Kralj, J., Meikle, W.G., Pettis, J.S., Rosenkranz, P., Sammataro, D., Smith, D., Yariez, O., Neumann, P. 2011. New avenues in the fight against the honeybee parasite Varroa destructor, a major threat to pollination. Apidologie. 51(1):125-132.

    New evidence that Deformed Wing Virus and Black Queen Cell Virus are Multi-host pathogens - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Zhang, X., He, S., Evans, J.D., Pettis, J.S., Yin, G., Chen, Y. 2012. New evidence that deformed wing virus and black queen cell virus are multi-host pathogens. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology. 109(1):156-159.

    The Bee Disease Diagnostic Service - 100 Years and Growing at the USDA Bee Research laboratory, Beltsville, MD - (Trade Journal)
    Smith Jr, I.B., Pettis, J.S. 2011. The bee disease diagnostic service - 100 years and growing at the USDA Bee Research Laboratory, Beltsville, MD. American Bee Journal. 151(8):767-772.

    The presence of Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus infection in Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in the U.S. - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Chen, Y., Evans, J.D., Pettis, J.S. 2011. The presence of chronic bee paralysis virus infection in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in the U.S.. Journal of Apiculture Research. 50:85-86.

    Concurrent infestations by Aethina tumida and Varroa destructor alters thermoregulation in Apis mellifera winter clusters - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Schaefer, M., Ritter, W., Pettis, J.S., Hartel, S., Neumann, P. 2011. Concurrent infestations by Aethina tumida and Varroa destructor alters thermoregulation in Apis mellifera winter clusters. Apidologie. 104(3):476-482.

    Effective gene silencing of a microsporidian parasite associated with honey bee (Apis mellifera) colony declines - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Paldi, N., Glick, E., Oliva, M., Zilbeberg, Y., Aubin, L., Pettis, J.S., Chen, Y., Evans, J.D. 2010. Effective gene silencing of a microsporidian parasite associated with honey bee (Apis mellifera) colony declines. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 76:5960-5964.

    A survey of managed honey bee colony losses in the USA, fall 2009 to winter 2010 - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Vanengelsdorp, D., Hayes, J., Underwood, R.M., Caron, D., Pettis, J.S. 2010. A survey of managed honey bee colony losses in the USA, fall 2009 to winter 2010. Journal of Apicultural Research. 50(1):1-10.

    Large-scale field application of RNAi technology reducing Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus Disease in honey bees (Apis mellifera, Hymenoptera; Apidae) - (Peer Reviewed Journal)

    Hunter, W.B., Ellis, J.D., vanEnglesdorp, D., Hayes, J., Westervelt, D., Glick, E., Williams, M., Sela, I., Maori, E., Pettis, J., Cox-Foster, D., Paldi, N. 2010. Large-scale field application of RNAi technology reducing Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus disease in honey bees (Apis mellifera, Hymenoptera: Apidae). PLoS Pathogens. 6(12):e1001160.

    Preventing bee mortality with RNA interference - (Abstract Only)
    Hunter, W.B., Ellis, J., Vanengelsdrop, D., Hayes, J., Westervelt, D., Williams, M., Sela, I., Maori, E., Pettis, J.S., Cox-Foster, D., Paldi, N. 2010. Preventing bee mortality with RNA interference [abstract]. National Citrus Research Coordination Symposium, June 16-18, 2010, Denver, Colorado.

    Organic acids and thymol: unsuitable alternative control of Aethina tumida Murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Buchholz, S., Merkel, K., Spiewok, S., Imdorf, A., Pettis, J.S., Westervelt, D., Ritter, W., Duncan, M., Rosenkranz, P., Spooner-Hart, R., Neumann, P. 2010. Organic acids and thymol: Unsuitable alternative control of aethina tumida murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae). Apidologie. 42:349-363.

    Genomic survey of the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, a major pest of the honey bee Apis mellifera - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Cornman, R.S., Schatz, M.C., Johnston, S.J., Chen, Y., Pettis, J.S., Hunt, G., Bourgeois, A.L., Elsik, C., Anderson, D., Grozinger, C.M., Evans, J.D. 2010.

    Genomic survey of the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, a major pest of the honey bee Apis mellifera. Biomed Central (BMC) Genomics. 11:602.

    Pesticides and honey bee health: High levels of Acaricides and crop protection chemicals in U.S. apiaires - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Mullin, C., Frazier, M., Frazier, J.L., Ashcraft, S., Simonds, R., Vanengelsdorp, D., Pettis, J.S. 2010.

    Pesticides and honey bee health: High levels of Acaricides and crop protection chemicals in U.S. apiaires. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 5(3):e9754.

    Chasing your honey: Worldwide diaspora of the small hive beetle, a parasite of honey bee colonies - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Lounsberry, Z.T., Spiewok, S., Pernal, S., Sonstegard, T.S., Hood, M.W., Pettis, J.S., Neumann, P., Evans, J.D. 2010.

    Chasing your honey: Worldwide diaspora of the small hive beetle, a parasite of honey bee colonies. Annals of the Entomological Society of America. 104:671-677.

    Coordinated responses to honey bee decline in the USA - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Pettis, J.S., Delaplane, K. 2010. Coordinated responses to honey bee decline in the USA. Journal of Economic Entomology. 41:256-263.
    Molecular approaches to the Analysis of Virus Replication and Pathogenesis in Honey Bees, Apis mellifera - (Peer Reviewed Journal) Boncristiani Jr, H.F., Diprisco, G., Pettis, J.S., Hamilton, M.C., Chen, Y. 2009.

    Molecular approaches to the Analysis of Virus Replication and Pathogenesis in Honey Bees, Apis mellifera. Journal of Virological Methods. 6:221.

    Reviewing colony losses and Colony Collapse Disorder in the United States - (Review Article)
    Ellis, J., Evans, J.D., Pettis, J.S. 2009. Reviewing colony losses and Colony Collapse Disorder in the United States. Journal of Apicultural Research. 49:134-136.

    First analysis of risk factors associated with bee colony collapse disorder by classification and regression trees - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Vanengelsdorp, D., Speybroeck, N., Evans, J.D., Nguyen, B., Mullin, C., Frazier, M., Frazier, J., Cox-Foster, D., Chen, Y., Tarpy, D., Haubruge, E., Pettis, J.S., Saegerman, C. 2010. First analysis of risk factors associated with bee colony collapse disorder by classification and regression trees. Journal of Economic Entomology. 103:1517-1523.

    Winter losses of honeybee colonies (Apis mellifera): The role of infestations with Aethina tumida and Varroa destructor - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Schafer, M.O., Ritter, W., Pettis, J.S., Neumann, P. 2009. Winter losses of honeybee colonies (Apis mellifera): The role of infestations with Aethina tumida and Varroa destructor. Journal of Economic Entomology. 103:10-16.

    Colony Collapse Disorder: A descriptive studey - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Vanengelsdorp, D., Evans, J.D., Saegerman, C., Mullen, C., Haubruge, E., Nyguyen, K., Frazier, M., Frazier, J., Cox-Foster, D., Chen, Y., Underwood, R., Tarpy, D., Pettis, J.S. 2009. Colony Collapse Disorder: A descriptive study. PLoS One. 4(8):e6481.
    Bee cups: Single-use cages for honey bee experiments - (Peer Reviewed Journal)

    Evans, J.D., Chen, Y., Diprisco, G., Pettis, J.S., Williams, V.P. 2009. Bee cups: Single-use cages for honey bee experiments. Journal of Apicultural Research. 48(4):300-302.

    Honeybee Sacbrood virus infects adult small hive beetles, Aethina tumida (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Eyer, M., Chen, Y., Schaefer, M., Pettis, J.S., Neumann, P. 2009. Honeybee Sacbrood virus infects adult small hive beetles, Aethina tumida (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae). Journal of Apicultural Research. 48(4):296-297.

    Asymmetrical Coexistence of Nosema ceranae and N. apis in Honey Bees - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Chen, Y., Evans, J.D., Zhou, L., Boncristiani Jr, H.F., Kimura, K., Xiao, T., Litkowski, A.M., Pettis, J.S. 2009. Asymmetrical Coexistence of Nosema ceranae and N. apis in Honey Bees. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology. 101:204-209.

    Entombed pollen: A new condition in honey bee colonies associated with increased risk of colony mortality - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Vanengelsdorp, D., Evans, J.D., Donovall, L., Mullin, C., Frazier, M., Frazier, J., Pettis, J.S., Hayes, J. 2009. Entombed pollen: A new condition in honey bee colonies associated with increased risk of colony mortality. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology. 101:147-149.

    Genomic analyses of the microsporidian Nosema ceranae, an emergent pathogen of honey bees. Reprint Icon - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Cornman, R.S., Chen, Y., Schatz, M., Street, C., Zhao, Y., Desany, B., Egholm, M., Hutchison, S., Pettis, J.S., Lipkin, W.I., Evans, J.D. 2009. Genomic analyses of the microsporidian Nosema ceranae, an emergent pathogen of honey bees. PLoS Pathogens. 5(6):e1000466.

    Effects of organic acid treatments on small hive beetles, Aethina tumida, and the associated yeast Kodamaea ohmeri. - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Schaefer, M., Ritter, W., Pettis, J.S., Teal, P.E., Neumann, P. 2009. Effects of organic acid treatments on small hive beetles, Aethina tumida, and the associated yeast Kodamaea ohmeri. Journal of Pest Science. 82:283-287.

    Morphological, molecular, and phylogenetic characterization of Nosema cerana, a microsporidian parasite isolated from the European honey bee, Apis mellifera - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Chen, Y., Evans, J.D., Murphy, C.A., Gutell, R., Lee, J., Zuker, M., Gundersen, D.E., Pettis, J.S. 2009. Morphological, molecular, and phylogenetic characterization of Nosema cerana, a microsporidian parasite isolated from the European honey bee, Apis mellifera. Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology. 56(2):142-147.

    Small hive beetle, Aethina tumida, is a potential biological vector of honeybee viruses. - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Eyer, M., Chen, Y., Pettis, J.S., Neumann, P. 2008. Small hive beetle, Aethina tumida, is a potential biological vector of honeybee viruses. Apidologie. 40:419-428.

    Comparisons of Pollen Substitute Diets for Honey bees: Consumprion Rates by Colonies and Effects on Brood and Adult Populations - (Other)
    Hoffman, G.D., Wardell, G., Ahumada-Secura, F., Rinderer, T.E., Danka, R.G., Pettis, J.S. 2008. Comparisons of Pollen Substitute Diets for Honey bees: Consumprion Rates by Colonies and Effects on Brood and Adult Populations. Journal of Apicultural Research 47:265-270.

    A simple method for quantitative diagnosis of small hive beetles, Aethina tumida, in the field - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Schafer, M., Pettis, J.S., Ritter, W., Neumann, P. 2008. A simple method for quantitative diagnosis of small hive beetles, Aethina tumida, in the field. Apidologie. 39:564-565.

    Virus infections in Brazilian honey bees - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Teixeira, E.W., Chen, Y., Message, D., Pettis, J.S., Evans, J.D. 2008. Virus infections in Brazilian honey bees. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology. 99:117-119.

    Genetic analysis of Israel Acute Paralysis Virus: distinct clusters are circulating into the United States. - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Palacios, G., Hui, J., Quan, P., Kalkstein, A.L., Honkavuori, K.S., Bussetti, A.V., Conlan, S., Evans, J.D., Chen, Y., Vanengelsdoorp, D., Efrat, H., Pettis, J.S., Cox-Foster, D.L., Holmes, E.C., Briese, T., Lipkin, I.W. 2008. Genetic analysis of Israel Acute Paralysis Virus: Distinct clusters are circulating into the United States. Journal of Virology. 82:6209-6217.

    Reaction Norm Variants for Male Calling Song in Natural Populations of Achroia Grisella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): towards a Resolution of the Lek Paradox - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Zhou, Y., Kuster, H., Pettis, J.S., Danka, R.G., Gleason, J.M., Greenfield, M.D. 2008. Reaction Norm Variants for Male Calling Song in Natural Populations of Achroia Grisella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): towards a Resolution of the Lek Paradox. Evolution 1317-1334.

    Potential host shift of the small hive beetle (Aethina tumida Murray) to bumblebee colonies (Bombus impatiens Cresson) - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Neumann, P., Hoffmann, D., Pettis, J.S. 2008. Potential host shift of the small hive beetle (Aethina tumida Murray) to bumblebee colonies (Bombus impatiens Cresson). Insectes Sociaux. 55:153-162.

    Multi-class determination and confirmation of antibiotic residues in honey using LC-MS/MS - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Lopez, M., Pettis, J.S., Smith Jr., I.B., Pak-Sin, C. 2008. Multi-class determination and confirmation of antibiotic residues in honey using LC-MS/MS. Journal of Food Chemistry. 56(5):1553-1559.

    A metagenomic survey of microbes in honey bee colony collapse disorder - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Cox-Foster, D.L., Conlan, S., Holmes, E.C., Palacios, G., Evans, J.D., Moran, N.A., Quan, P., Briese, T., Hornig, M., Geiser, D.M., Martinson, V., Vanengelsdorp, D., Kalkstein, A.L., Drysdale, A., Hui, J., Zhai, J., Cui, L., Hutchison, S.K., Simons, J., Egholm, M., Pettis, J.S., Lipkin, W. 2007. A metagenomic survey of microbes in honey bee colony collapse disorder. Science. 318:283-287.

    Nosema Ceranae is a long present and wide spread microsporidian infection of the European honey bee (Apis mellifera) in the United States. - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Chen, Y., Evans, J.D., Smith Jr, I.B., Pettis, J.S. 2007. Nosema Ceranae is a long present and wide spread microsporidian infection of the European honey bee (Apis mellifera) in the United States. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology. 92:152-159.

    Diagnostic genetic test for the honey bee tracheal mite, Acarapis woodi - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Evans, J.D., Pettis, J.S., Smith Jr, I.B. 2007. Diagnostic genetic test for the honey bee tracheal mite, Acarapis woodi. Journal of Apicultural Research. 46(3):1-5.

    A DNA method for screening hive debris for the presence of small hive beetle (Aethina tumida) - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Ward, L., Brown, M., Neumann, P., Wilkins, S., Pettis, J.S., Neil, B. 2007. A dna method for screening hive debris for the presence of small hive beetle (aethina tumida). Apidologie. 38:272-280.

    CHANGES AT THE BEE RESEARCH LAB IN BELTSVILLE - (Trade Journal)
    Pettis, J.S. 2006. Changes at the bee research lab in beltsville. American Bee Journal. 146(6):477.

    SURVIVAL AND FUNCTION OF QUEENS REARED IN BEESWAX CONTAINING COUMAPHOS - (Trade Journal)
    Collins, A.M., Pettis, J.S., Wilbanks, R., Feldlaufer, M.F. 2006. Survival and function of queens reared in beeswax containing coumaphos. American Bee Journal. 146(4):341-344.

    DETECTING COUMAPHOS RESISTANCE IN VARROA MITES - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Pettis, J.S., Jadczak, T. 2005. Detecting coumaphos resistance in varroa mites. American Bee Journal. 145(12):967-970.

    PREVALENCE AND TRANSMISSION ROUTES OF HONEY BEE VIRUSES - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Chen, Y., Pettis, J.S., Collins, A.M., Feldlaufer, M.F. 2006. Prevalence and transmission routes of honey bee viruses. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 72(1):606-611.

    EFFICACY OF TYLOSIN AND LINCOMYCIN IN CONTROLLING AMERICAN FOULBROOD IN HONEY BEE COLONIES - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Pettis, J.S., Feldlaufer, M.F. 2005. Efficacy of tylosin and lincomycin in controlling american foulbrood in honey bee colonies. Journal of Apicultural Research. 44(3):106-108

    COLONY-LEVEL IMPACTS OF IMMUNE RESPONSIVENESS IN HONEY BEES, APIS MELLIFERA. - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Evans, J.D., Pettis, J.S. 2005. Colony-level impacts of immune responsiveness in honeybees, Apis mellifera. Evolution. 59(10):2270-2274.

    SCREENING ADDITIONAL ANTIBIOTICS FOR EFFICACY AGAINST AMERICAN FOULBROOD. - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Kochansky, J.P., Pettis, J.S. 2005. Screening additional antibiotics for efficacy against american foulbrood. Journal of Apicultural Research. 44(1):24-28.

    OBSERVATION ON THE BIOLOGY OF THE HONEY BEE TRACHEAL MITE ACARAPIS WOODI (ACARI: TARSONEMIDAE) USING LOW-TEMPERATURE SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Ochoa, R., Pettis, J.S., Erbe, E.F., Wergin, W.P. 2005. Observation on the biology of the honey bee tracheal mite Acarapis woodi (Acari: Tarsonemidae) using low-temperature scanning electron microscopy. Experimental and Applied Acarology. 35:239-249. (#161535: April 1, 2005)

    DETECTION OF MULTIPLE VIRUSES IN QUEENS OF THE HONEY BEE, APIS MELLIFERA L. - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Chen, Y., Pettis, J.S., Feldlaufer, M.F. 2004. Detection of multiple viruses in queens of the honey bee, apis mellifera l. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology. 90:118-121.

    PERFORMANCE OF HONEY BEE APIS MELLIFERA L., QUEENS REARED IN BEESWAX CELLS IMPREGNATED WITH COUMAPHOS - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Collins, A.M., Pettis, J.S., Wilbanks, R., Feldlaufer, M.F. 2004. Performance of honey bee apis mellifera l., queens reared in beeswax cells impregnated with coumaphos. Journal of Apicultural Research. 43(3):128-134.
    RESIDUE LEVELS IN HONEY AFTER COLONY TREATMENT WITH THE ANTIBIOTIC TYLOSIN - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Feldlaufer, M.F., Pettis, J.S., Kochansky, J.P., Kramer, M.H. 2004. Residue levels in honey after colony treatment with the antibiotic tylosin. American Bee Journal. 144:143-145.

    MOLECULAR EVIDENCE FOR TRANSMISSION OF KASHMIR BEE VIRUS IN HONEY BEE COLONIES BY ECTOPARASITIC MITE, VARROA DESTRUCTOR - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Chen, Y., Pettis, J.S., Evans, J.D., Feldlaufer, M.F. 2004. Molecular evidence for transmission of kashmir bee virus in honey bee colonies by ectoparasitic mite, varroa destructor. Apidologie. 35(4):441-448.

    DETECTION OF DEFORMED WING VIRUS INFECTION IN HONEY BEES APIS MELLIFERA L. IN THE UNITED STATES - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Chen, Y., Smith, Jr., I.B., Collins, A.M., Pettis, J.S., Feldlaufer, M.F. 2004. Detection of deformed wing virus infection in honey bees Apis mellifera L. in the United States. American Bee Journal. 144(7):557-559.

    EFFECTS OF COUMAPHOS ON QUEEN REARING IN THE HONEY BEE, APIS MELLIFERA L. - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Pettis, J.S., Collins, A.M., Wilbanks, R., Feldlaufer, M.F. 2004. Effects of coumaphos on queen rearing in the honey bee, apis mellifera l. Apidologie. 35:605-610

    A SCIENTIFIC NOTE ON VARROA DESTRUCTOR RESISTANCE TO COUMAPHOS IN THE UNITED STATES. - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Pettis, J.S. 2003. A scientific note on varroa destructor resistance to coumaphos in the united states.. Apidologie. 2003 35:91-92.

    INTERCEPTION OF A LIVE VARROA MITE ON IMPORTED CUT FLOWERS IN THE UNITED STATES - (Research Notes)
    Pettis, J.S., Ochoa, R., Orr, J. 2003. Interception of a live varroa mite on imported cut flowers in the united states. International Journal of Acarology. 29:291-292

    LARVAL HONEY BEE MORTALITY FOLLOWING TOPICAL APPLICATION OF ANTIBIOTICS AND DUSTS - (Peer Reviewed Journal)
    Pettis, J.S., Kochansky, J.P., Feldlaufer, M.F. 2002. Larval honey bee mortality following topical application of antibiotics and dusts. Journal of Economic Entomology. 97(2):171-176.

    TRACKING AN INVASIVE HONEY BEE PEST: MITOCHONDRIAL DNA VARIATION IN SMALL HIVE BEETLES FROM NORTH AMERICA - (Peer Reviewed Journal) - (23-Jul-02)

    APIS MELLIFERA QUEEN REPLACEMENT IN THE PRESENCE OF CHEMICAL "STRESS". - (Abstract Only) - (25-Jun-02)

    USE OF HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS IN THE CONTROL OF SMALL HIVE BEETLE LARVAE AND RECOVERY OF TREATED COMBS - (Peer Reviewed Journal) - (12-Apr-02)
    EVIDENCE OF RESISTANCE TO COUMAPHOS BY VARROA MITES IN THE U.S. - (Trade Journal) - (20-Nov-01)

    RESISTANCE MECHANISM OF VARROA JACOBSONI TO FLUVALINATE ALTERED SODIUM CHANNEL? - (Proceedings) - (04-Sep-01)

    LINCOMYCIN HYDROCHLORIDE FOR THE CONTROL OF AMERICAN FOULBROOD DISEASE OF HONEY BEES - (Peer Reviewed Journal) - (30-Jul-01)

    EFFECT OF VARROA INFESTATION ON SEMEN QUALITY - (Trade Journal) - (04-Jun-01)

    USE OF MICROSATELLITE DNA LOCI TO INFER GENETIC STRUCTURE IN THE HONEY BEE PARASITIC MITE VARROA DESTRUCTOR - (Peer Reviewed Journal) - (07-Apr-01)

    SCREENING OF ALTERNATIVE ANTIBIOTICS AGAINST OXYTETRACYCLINE-SUSCEPTIBLE AND -RESISTANT AMERICAN FOULBROOD - (Peer Reviewed Journal) - (15-Feb-01)

    SCREENING ANTIBIOTICS AGAINST RESISTANT AND SUSCEPTIBLE AMERICAN FOULBROOD - (Abstract Only) - (15-Feb-01)

    COMPARISON OF THE DIETARY AND TISSUE STEROLS OF THE SMALL HIVE BEETLE AETHINA TUMIDA (COLEOPTERA:NITIDULIDAE) - (Peer Reviewed Journal) - (01-Sep-00)

    AIRING OUT SMALL HIVE BEETLE PROBLEMS IN THE HONEY HOUSE - (Popular Publication) - (30-May-00)

    MITOCHONDRIAL DNA RELATIONSHIPS IN AN EMERGENT PEST: SMALL HIVE BEETLES, AETHINA TUMIDA (COLEOPTERA:NITIDULIDAE), FROM THE UNITED STATES AND AFRICA. - (Peer Reviewed Journal) Evans, J.D., Pettis, J.S., Shimanuki, H. 2000. Mitochondrial dna relationships in an emergent pest: small hive beetles, aethina tumida (coleoptera:nitidulidae), from the united states and africa. Annals of the Entomological Society of America. 9:415-520.

    A HIVE MODIFICATION TO REDUCE VARROA POPULATIONS. - (Peer Reviewed Journal) - (01-Jun-99)

    NON-CHEMICAL CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR VARROA - (Abstract Only) - (10-Mar-99)

    A FIELD ASSAY TO DETECT FLUVALINATE RESISTANCE IN VARROA MITES. - (Peer Reviewed Journal) - (01-Jul-98)
    BEES (CHAPTER 14) - (Book / Chapter) - (22-May-98)

    ARS News Articles
    item Survey Reports Latest Honey Bee Losses
    item Bee Parasite's Genome Sequenced
    item Higher Pathogen Loads Noted in CCD Bee Colonies
    item Still Seeking a Cause of Colony Collapse Disorder
    item Queen Bees Can Pass Virus to Offspring
    item New Test Detects Pesticide-Resistant Bee Mites
    item Lab Consortium Honors ARS Tech Transfer
    item Virus Link to Vanishing Bees
    item Improving Honey Bee Health
    item Survey Reports Latest Honey Bee Losses
    item USDA/AIA Survey Reports 2010/2011 Winter Honey Bee Losses
    item Survey Reports Fewer Winter Honey Bee Losses
    item Bees Exposed to Fungicide More Vulnerable to Nosema Parasite
    item Bees Exposed to Fungicide More Vulnerable to Nosema Parasite

  16. #96
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,514

    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueDiamond View Post
    I'd insert: "3. pesticides FORCE FED to bees can have sub-lethal effects on development, reproduction, learning and memory, and foraging behavior."...
    You just have no idea how science is produced - any potential drug is FORCE FED to experimental animal, mouse, rat etc. to see the effect (if any). Any pharmaceutical company FORCE FED millions of experimental animals before drug is available to FORCE FEED humans.

    obtaining career enhancing peer reviewed papers is very honorable! What is dishonorable is to trash somebody's work without any credentials. If you disagree with paper - you must write a letter to the editor - if your complains are reasonable, your comment will be published. This is how civilized people would do. In fact, I am going to write the letter to the editor of the paper you cited above with complains that author,
    David Drexler did not disclose the obvious conflict of the interest.
    Серёжа, Sergey

  17. #97
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    3,064

    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    Quote Originally Posted by BayHighlandBees View Post
    and nicotine is a natural plant defense that evolved to protect against chomping insects.
    One alternative use for tobacco is to make a soup out of it or really more of a tea and use that mixture as an insecticide. I repels the insects rather than kill them. Not many insects will eat tobacco. It is a member of the nightshade family along with the Tomato. Like the Tomato the Horned Tomato worm (Larva of the Sphinx Moth) is about the biggest pest. There are some molds and a disease or tow that effect it. Aphids will also be found on it but I never see them to much. Bees will not touch it although they like to set on the dark leaves early in the morning to get warm. There is a wasp here that seems determined to get to the seed pods and have even eaten through cloth to get to them.

    The claim is that tobacco repels insects so effectively solely because of the nicotine.

    One though I have. if nicotine naturally repels honey bees. Why can't they make an insecticide that actually repels bees?
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  18. #98
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Sacramento, Calif. USA
    Posts
    272

    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDawg View Post
    Bees have to eat. They collected pollen from the wild as bees would do, and then fed them the pollen in a lab setting so they could monitor the results. They didn't hold their mouths open and force the pollen down their throats--it was the only food source available and so the bees ate it. The freely fed upon the pollen--they were NOT force fed...
    The bees in the study were not outside in a real world crop / orchard field environment to feed on the pollen. So the study did not demonstrate that bee colonies situated in ag areas where fungicides are used have an impaired ability to fight off Nosema ceranae. As Bayer's Dr. Julian Little has said: "All studies looking at the interaction of bees and pesticides must be done in a full field situation"

  19. #99
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Norwell, MA
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    To be fair, I don't know the person with the name tag "BlueDiamond", so I could very well be wrong.

    But let me venture a guess that he's some how affiliated with the Blue Diamond almond growers cooperative, based out of Sacramento, California which does over 700 million dollars worth of business a year. Looking lean and hard at their bee contracts, he's probably doing an over/under on what would happen to his business if suddenly he couldn't use neonics on his crops and had to switch back to a dirtier pesticide like an organophosphate. He's also probably wondering what impact a smear campaign on neonics (which he uses), or having to switch to organophosphates because of some ban, would have on his costs for already pricey pollination contracts as commercial beekeepers become warier of the losses they could incur from pollinating his dirty crops, driving up his overall costs.

    His overall view of bees and beekeepers probably reduces to something along the lines of the going rate for manure, or irrigation, or some other necessary operating cost.

    So he comes here, and every single one of his posts tries to mitigate an otherwise moderate, concerned conversation on a bee forum about one of the possible causes or influences surrounding colony collapse disorder.

    To be fair, his concerns are valid in the context of his business and the impact is one which should be kept squarely on screen when talking about what the causes of CCD are, and what the impacts of action look like. But, for my money, I'm guessing his presence here is nothing more than a not-so-subtle attempt at lobbying a business position, and not, in its current form, relevant to an overarching, objective conversation on neonics, bees, or the science of studying CCD.

  20. #100
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Sacramento, Calif. USA
    Posts
    272

    Default Re: 600 Hives Lost in Ontario--CCD/Neonics Suspected Cause

    Quote Originally Posted by cerezha View Post
    You just have no idea how science is produced - any potential drug is FORCE FED to experimental animal, mouse, rat etc. to see the effect (if any). Any pharmaceutical company FORCE FED millions of experimental animals before drug is available to FORCE FEED humans.
    When a pesticide manufacturer considers introducing a new insecticide to the marketplace it conducts numerous field trials to see if the chemical kills as well in real world field situations (vs existing competitive products) as it does in forced exposure laboratory settings. They know from decades of experience that just because the forced exposure lab studies show the insecticide kills well, in the real world it may not. Ditto in regard to sublethal effects; i.e. just because these effects can be detected in forced exposure lab settings, doesn't mean they will be in a real life full field situations.

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