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Thread: honey excluder

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA
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    Default honey excluder

    Anyone ever see a queen cross over a full box of honey to lay above it or is it a pretty dependable excluder? John

  2. #2

    Default Re: honey excluder

    Yes but it is rare.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: honey excluder

    Yes. A cpl years ago I saw a queen on an inner cover which was above a top feeder which was above a super of foundation. Go figure.
    Mark Berninghausen "Ships at a distance have every man's wish on board." Zora Neale Hurston

  4. #4
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    Default Re: honey excluder

    I've found a queen a couple times on the underside of the inner cover when not using an excluder, that's why I always check the inner cover before I set it aside. Anyway, my thinking is that if a queen crosses over a super full of honey, she knows it, and she also knows that laying eggs above that super would be dividing up the broodnest, but I'm sure it happens on rare occasion. The workers are probably responsible for guiding her up there too. John

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    Gig Harbor, Washington
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    Default Re: honey excluder

    I have a different question about the excluder. This is my first hive and I put a honey super and excluder on last week, on this weeks inspection there was burr comb over 1/4 of the excluder and no drawn out comb in the honey super. The excluder is cypress wood frame and metal grid bought from Rossmans. Is there any thing I can do to slow down the build-up of burr comb?

  6. #6
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    Default Re: honey excluder

    What will slow it down somewhat is when they start working in the super. Bees don't like going through excluders, especially if there is nothing but foundation in the super, which I assume you are using. Try removing the excluder and go back in about 4-5 days and see what's happening in the super, most likely they will be up there starting to draw comb, unless of course your hives are not strong enough yet to need the extra space. Once they start working on drawing 2-3 frames and storing some nectar in them, then you can put the excluder back on. There is a chance that the queen may move up there as they draw some foundation out, and start laying eggs, if so you have to make sure she is below the excluder before you put it back on. Usually once they start working on a super, they stick with it. John

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2002
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    San Mateo, CA
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    Default Re: honey excluder

    If the brood chamber is all worker comb a queen will go seven supers up over solid honey looking for drone comb. Don't put foundation above an excluder unless the bees have already crossed the excluders into other supers below the foundation. And then only during a good flow.

  8. #8
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    Jun 2013
    Location
    Gig Harbor, Washington
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    Default Re: honey excluder

    Thanks for the Info. Your both right I did just put foundation above the excluder only because that is what I have. As far as a strong hive I'm not sure, there is about 2 1/2 frames below the excluder that still needs to be drawn out. The first deep hive body has only 1/2 frame left to be drawn out with the rest in the second deep hive body. I may have to wait a few days before removing the excluder related to rain for the next two days. So if I understand, bees will not pass a excluder if the super is all foundation and I should have just put the supper on and wait until a few frames are drawn out before putting the excluder.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: honey excluder

    If everything falls into place just right, bees will cross an excluder to draw foundation, that is, you need an excellent honey flow, and the brood chamber below needs to be 90% or more drawn out and filled with honey, pollen, brood and pretty well stuffed with bees wall to wall. Anything less than that, and you need to leave the excluder off at first until the bees start working on at least a couple frames and storing something in them or the queen laying in them. John

  10. #10
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    May 2002
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    Default Re: honey excluder

    >If everything falls into place just right, bees will

    That is asking a lot in beekeeping.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Gig Harbor, Washington
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    6

    Default Re: honey excluder

    Well I took off the excluder after work today and the bees had already replaced about a third of the burr comb I scraped off yesterday. So now I'm going to wait until Saturday to see if the bees have started to work the new foundation. I want to thank every one that has replied and so do my bees. happy bees make a happy bee keeper.

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