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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Baytown, TX., USA.
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    Default Five Gallon Swarm Trap

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/77932428@N05/9136769427/

    This is a swarm trap I made using a five gallon bucket. Five gallon is close to 20 liters so it may be smallish. I have had three out for about 6 weeks with no catch. Inside the top are five tongue depressors glued to a plywood roof 1 1/4 inch apart. Also a dab of lemon oil and a commercial queen attractant, again just a dab. The top edge is drilled with many 1/8 th inch holes, the bottom also, for venting. All are near commercial bee yards. No swarms, none, not a sniff. Do you think this is a bad design?
    Julysun elevation 23 feet. 4 Hives, 2 years.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Cookeville, TN, USA
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    Default Re: Five Gallon Swarm Trap

    It might be a little on the small side, but I saw somewhere (on here probably) where a swarm had moved into a bucket that was sitting upside down on a tree stand. So, give it time. Try to put them near 2nd year bee keepers.

  3. #3
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    Apr 2012
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    Baytown, TX., USA.
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    651

    Default Re: Five Gallon Swarm Trap

    "Try to put them near 2nd year bee keepers." David FUNNY!
    They are near one. ME!
    Julysun elevation 23 feet. 4 Hives, 2 years.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Five Gallon Swarm Trap

    Sorry 'bout that. Second year is tough if you do good your first year. Nice strong overwintered hives and no comb to give them.

  5. #5
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    Apr 2012
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    Baytown, TX., USA.
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    Default Re: Five Gallon Swarm Trap

    Hey, that is fine, I was just trying to be funny!

    You are totally right about 2nd year. Things busting out all over and me being slow to react,
    Julysun elevation 23 feet. 4 Hives, 2 years.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
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    5,038

    Default Re: Five Gallon Swarm Trap

    >Do you think this is a bad design?
    Yes....

    All swarm traps should have the shape and frames/topbars of your final hive so that you do not have to do a cutout. Also, it might be too hot. Use your favorite brood chambers for traps.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Baytown, TX., USA.
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    651

    Default Re: Five Gallon Swarm Trap

    What dimension did you use to get that top finger on your box to be so wide? I have been thinking of just dropping the last cutout to get a really wide finger. Then glue and nail it firmly.
    I do have two nuc boxes and one 8 frame deep out so I am half way home on traps.
    Since I have you here, what do you think of, new to me, corner protectors?

    By the way, Thanks for the response.
    Julysun elevation 23 feet. 4 Hives, 2 years.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    5,038

    Default Re: Five Gallon Swarm Trap

    That is a Mann Lake Budget box. The only corner protectors I have seen were little black plastic thingys, looked like a nuisance to me. Worn corners make it more convenient to get your hive tool in.



    Quote Originally Posted by julysun View Post
    What dimension did you use to get that top finger on your box to be so wide? I have been thinking of just dropping the last cutout to get a really wide finger. Then glue and nail it firmly. I do have two nuc boxes and one 8 frame deep out so I am half way home on traps.
    Since I have you here, what do you think of, new to me, corner protectors?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    1,238

    Default Re: Five Gallon Swarm Trap

    I would think it might get too hot inside to attract a swarm.

    Look at the DIY section for D Coats Nuc, very easy to make out of scrap wood.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Baytown, TX., USA.
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    651

    Default Re: Five Gallon Swarm Trap

    FlowerPlanter, True and I have two. Just trying something new, to me. Not much wasted on the project. Will go some new, or old, route.

    Thanks for your advice.
    Julysun elevation 23 feet. 4 Hives, 2 years.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Shickshinny, Pennsylvania
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    940

    Default Re: Five Gallon Swarm Trap

    I'll be a second year newbe next year , so what is meant by -- ( Nice strong overwintered hives and no comb to give them.) No comb to give them ?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Baytown, TX., USA.
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    Default Re: Five Gallon Swarm Trap

    Laketrout, I think he knows new Beeks have very little spare or extra equipment. When the spring flow hits they find themselves scrambling to get boxes and Frames with wax (comb) to give to the hives as they expand and fill up all available space. Old Beeks of course have barns full of old boxes and internals from past misadventures.
    Julysun elevation 23 feet. 4 Hives, 2 years.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Cookeville, TN, USA
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    4,149

    Default Re: Five Gallon Swarm Trap

    Nope, I meant drawn comb. Having some honey supers full of empty drawn comb from extracting honey to give your bees in the spring is key to keeping them from swarming. Typically even if your bees do good the first year you get them they don't draw out enough frames of comb in addition to the brood chambers to do that. So a lot of second year bee keepers with strong over wintered hives really struggle to keep them from swarming. So setting swarm traps near second year bee keepers is actually not a joke. Not entirely.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    Shickshinny, Pennsylvania
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    940

    Default Re: Five Gallon Swarm Trap

    So your adding a super of drawn frames on top of the brood chambers to give them more room , this having nothing to do with honey supers. I'm having a hard time understanding just how much room they need , I thought rule of thumb was two deeps or three med., is there times like in the spring when you have to add more brood chambers and if so do you leave them on over the winter .

  15. #15
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    Cookeville, TN, USA
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    Default Re: Five Gallon Swarm Trap

    First of all understand that the whole concept of "brood chamber/honey super" is a bee keeper idea. Unless you use a queen excluder - which generally you should not - until you have at least some drawn comb in honey supers. There are some general trends, but the queen lays where she will, and the workers put honey where they can.

    If they have room they will often (sometimes) store most of the honey above the brood nest (in the honey supers) in the spring, but if they don't have room upstairs they will put nectar/honey right in the brood nest - and once that gets started it is much much more likely that they will issue a swarm during the same year.

    This is an extreme oversimplification, but...

    If you have supers full of drawn comb you start putting those on when your spring nectar flows first start - dandelion bloom more or less - and that is one of the main things you can do to make a honey crop and prevent swarming without splitting your hives.

    Supers full of undrawn foundation DO NOT WORK for swarm prevention. Period. When you hear the term "give them room" it means room to store honey in already drawn comb - not foundation.

    As far as I know all swarm mitigation strategies involve the use of drawn comb - or some form of splitting the hive. Except "opening the brood nest" which might work if you have enough skill to know exactly how and when to do it.

    And none of them are 100% effective when I do them.

    So possibly second year bee keepers with strong overwintered hives, and no supers full of empty drawn comb should seriously consider splitting aggressively early in the season - before any swarming activity whatsoever gets started. After splitting You can let your then multiple hives build comb that year - even if you recombine them in the fall. Or you can do what almost everyone actually does and try all the little tweaks (like opening the brood nest) to try to prevent swarming without having comb - and usually lose half your bees into the trees.

    You might get some honey in your second year either way, but you will get more done if you are realistic and do what you have to do to keep your bees in your boxes.

    This is way off of the original topic, but it does involve the word swarm.
    Last edited by David LaFerney; 06-28-2013 at 07:59 AM.

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