Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Chillicothe, Ohio
    Posts
    102

    Default ? about freezing honey

    Will freezing honey destroy the natural properties that some people want for allergies? Most of our customers buy our honey for that reason and we don't want to sell them anything but the best.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.
    Posts
    880

    Default Re: ? about freezing honey

    Just curious - why would you freeze honey?
    --shinbone
    (3rd year, 14 hives, Zone 5b, 5400 ft, 15.8" annual rainfall)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    108

    Default Re: ? about freezing honey

    Quote Originally Posted by Rosies View Post
    Will freezing honey destroy the natural properties that some people want for allergies? Most of our customers buy our honey for that reason and we don't want to sell them anything but the best.
    Personally I wouldn't freeze it if I was going to sell it. Is it not capped?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,958

    Default Re: ? about freezing honey

    Freezing seems to have less effect then keeping it in the 90 degree range for a year. I assume that honey freezes in natural situations as well. If I have bottled honey and want to keep it over winter I freeze it now. I used to keep it in an old refrigerator converted to a warmer but after a year at 90 degrees I think that the color has darkened slightly. It could be the light (warmer uses light bulbs) or the temperature. I just let it crystallize in a bucket, but after bottling I think that freezing is the best and easiest way to preserve honey.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Chillicothe, Ohio
    Posts
    102

    Default Re: ? about freezing honey

    The honey is capped. The reason I ask the question is; I was thinking about pulling some honey now and some later but would like to extract all of it later and don't want to chance having wax moths getting to it. I can't think of a safe way to store it other than freezing it.
    My real question is about the good properties for allergies being destroyed by freezing.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Kingsville, OH
    Posts
    959

    Default Re: ? about freezing honey

    I have only froze honey frames to save them to feed back to my nucs.

    But I disagree with freezing it once bottled. I do not believe there is any connection with storing it in a warmer and it's color. With time all honey gets darker.
    I have bottled honey that is from 1984 and it is black as coal and still fluid and tasty.

    As to freezing your honey suppers so you can extract it latter, I would do it myself.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,958

    Default Re: ? about freezing honey

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Franklin View Post
    But I disagree with freezing it once bottled. I do not believe there is any connection with storing it in a warmer and it's color. With time all honey gets darker.
    I have bottled honey that is from 1984 and it is black as coal and still fluid and tasty.
    I have stored some bottled honey from the same source in my freezer and some in the warmer. The next spring the honey from the warmer was slightly darker than the honey from the freezer. I also have honey from back in the 1980's. It's black as coal, still fluid and tastes like molasses. I keep meaning to feed it back to the bees if they will have it, but keep forgetting. It's only a couple of quarts.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Kingsville, OH
    Posts
    959

    Default Re: ? about freezing honey

    Quote Originally Posted by beedeetee View Post
    I have stored some bottled honey from the same source in my freezer and some in the warmer. The next spring the honey from the warmer was slightly darker than the honey from the freezer. I also have honey from back in the 1980's. It's black as coal, still fluid and tastes like molasses. I keep meaning to feed it back to the bees if they will have it, but keep forgetting. It's only a couple of quarts.
    If you want to sell it check with friends who are bakers. I have had request for my Vintage Honey.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads