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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    2

    Default Bees dead on floor of hivebox

    Is it normal for a substantial number of bees to die off in the Spring?

    As a rookie (my first year), I captured a swarm almost three weeks ago. I placed them in the hive box and all has been well. The bees have been active and building combs. The weather was warm and sunny here in Oregon for the first two weeks with abundant food sources, but the last week has been rainy and chilly (low 40's at night). I see this morning that a substantial number of bees are dead on the floor of my hive. What am I to make of this? Anything I should do (including removing the carcasses)?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Hudson, WI USA
    Posts
    2,212

    Default Re: Bees dead on floor of hivebox

    Do they have any stores? Have you been feeding them any syrup or adding honey frames to them?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Bees dead on floor of hivebox

    I have not fed the bees other than placing a pan of sugar water outside the hive. There are plenty of natural food sources nearby.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,770

    Default Re: Bees dead on floor of hivebox

    Welcome! I think that "substantial" depends a lot on the size of the swarm. Do you have the queen? You should see some brood by now. Certainly the bees in the swarm are closer to the end of their lives so emerging brood is needed to replace them.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Gloucester County, New Jersey
    Posts
    213

    Default Re: Bees dead on floor of hivebox

    "The last week has been rainy and chilly"

    The "undertaker" bees haven't been able to carry out the dead for the last week.
    If the queen starts laying 1500 eggs per day, eventually, that same amount die each day. Probably not all in the hive; some in the field, some eaten by predators, etc.

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