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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    8

    Default Thank you for welcoming me to the Bee community - Cypress, TX

    My name is Jake and I recently convinced my father to begin beekeeping. He built a top down hive and purchased a an Italian Queen + workers and we put them in the hive Sunday. Everything seemed like all was going great until my father called me up and told me to come look that the sky was darkened by the bees and they just flew over the fence into the pasture behind our house... ... WHAT!

    So we found the swarm on a branch in a tree and we were able to reach them and we recovered most of the bees. We put "her" and the others back into their beehive my father built for them and we plugged them in there so they could not escape. We put a bowl of sugar water in the hive and we coated the beeswax drop-down notches on the slates with a liberal brushing of honey. Additionally we moved her hive under a big pecan tree for the shade.

    Does anyone have any suggestion as to how long I should leave the hole to the hive completely corked up? We locked the bees in there about 30 hours ago. I don't really want her to fly off again...

    Thanks again for welcoming me to beesource.com!

    -Angler

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    4,945

    Default Re: Thank you for welcoming me to the Bee community - Cypress, TX

    Welcome to Beesource!

    If your top bar hive has an open screened bottom, you should consider closing off the screen with a board, at least until they have built substantial comb and brood. There are multiple reports here of new packages absconding from open screen bottom TBHs.

    Did you direct release the queen? How long were they in the hive before they absconded?

    As you are in Texas, overheating is a consideration. Your bees will be unable to regulate hive temperature with completely closed entrances. If you intent to keep it closed, at least use screen on the entrance.

    Also, a better feeder is a good idea. One option is to punch/drill small holes in the lid of a canning jar and invert the jar supported by shims so the bees can access the holes.

    Finally, you will get better advice if you put your location into your profile. "United States" isn't very useful. Send a PM to moderator Barry with a request to update your location. While readers of this thread can see you are in Cypress, that won't help in other threads.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alachua County, FL, USA
    Posts
    6,431

    Default Re: Thank you for welcoming me to the Bee community - Cypress, TX

    Welcome Jake! If bees are not allowed to get out to "relieve" themselves the toxins turn to crystals in their systems essentially poisoning them for life. I guess people do not collect insects as kids any more, but we used to always put holes in the jar because everything needs air. 40,000 bees need a lot of air.
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Pickens County, South Carolina, US
    Posts
    828

    Default Re: Thank you for welcoming me to the Bee community - Cypress, TX

    Welcome to the site!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Thank you for welcoming me to the Bee community - Cypress, TX

    Thank you for welcoming me to the site!

    I simply corked the entrance hole to the hive for 3 days. The bees were able to breath, the hive has a big screen bottom that allows for air transfer. The bees actually were able to squeeze under one of the slates and the formed "their entrance hole" and were using that entrance during the 3 day period. The colony is my fathers first colony and are Italian Bees! My father noted 6 combs being formed already! I would never want to harm any of the bees especially by suffocation...

    Since my father had a great hive and I had so much fun gathering up the swarm from the tree behind my house, I posted a Craigslist Ad for Bee Removal. I had many hits, so I made my way in town and got a swarm from a guys tree and I built a hive for it. This swarm was about 3 times as many bees as the one my father pre-order... (hopefully she is a brand new queen!) For future hives, I am now going to relocate the bees to interested beekeepers and help them over see the hives and thus solve three problems at once. 1) Getting bees away from people who don't want them around 2) Getting bees around people who do like them 3) Enjoy life more knowing I am helping the bees out! + It makes for more beautiful springs!

    I have walked for 3 hours spanning several miles of parks/forest area, of which many flowers and honey suckles have been in full bloom, and I still have not seen a wild bee yet '_'

    WTH is happening to our bees? Exterminators are poisoning them and its like the Lorax movie... do we have to kill every last bee to realize just how special they are?

    I will help relocate bees in Houston, TX!

    -Jake

    PS: Ill try and attach a picture of both hives. The new hive I built this weekend I named it Jafar, after the gentleman who gave me my first hive!

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