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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Burlington, VT, USA
    Posts
    35

    Default Moving hive a short distance?

    Newbee here,
    I need to move my hive about ten feet to the right of its existing location so that it gets morning sun, earlier in the day.
    Suggestions?
    Thanks
    Tone

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA, USA
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Moving hive a short distance?

    Quote Originally Posted by tonetone28 View Post
    Newbee here,
    I need to move my hive about ten feet to the right of its existing location so that it gets morning sun, earlier in the day.
    Suggestions?
    Thanks
    Tone
    I moved a hive about 100 feet - due to a disturbed neighbor - did it at night, and read a bunch from Michael Bush before I did it. The big thing is to make the bees reorient when they leave the hive. I put a large leafy branch in front of the entrance so they had to stop and figure out how to get out. I had a few hundred that went back to the original spot but captured them in a nuc and moved them at night to the new spot. Check on http://www.bushfarms.com/beesmoving.htm for more info.

    Good Luck.
    Gary Anderson
    Baton Rouge, LA

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Oxon, UK
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Moving hive a short distance?

    To my knowledge it used to be that you'd need to move the hive a few miles away first which is clearly a pain and probably stressful for the bees too.

    However another easier method I've heard of is to follow the following procedure - Assuming you have a mesh floor for ventilation....

    1. At night, when all the bees are in the hive, tape up the entrance to keep them inside.

    2. Leave them in there for a minimum of 24 hours (this is why you need the mesh floor or mesh top for ventilation)

    3. Move the hive to the new area

    4. Place some leafy obstruction directly over the entrance (such as branches with pine needs, heavy foliage etc). Something that forces the bees to navigate around it.

    5. Open the hive.

    It's my understanding that the 24 hours inside the hive, PLUS the immediate disorientation of having the leafy obstruction forces the bees to immediately re-orientate themselves. Leave this obstruction on for another 12 hours or so and then remove it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Grand Junction, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    231

    Default Re: Moving hive a short distance?

    I move hives anywhere from 2 ft. to 30 ft. within the bee yard without any ill effects, normally early morning or late evening. Bees are more flexible then we give them credit for.
    Jack Moore ~ Sticky Bear Apiary
    Zone 7a ~ Elev: 4840ft. ~ https://www.facebook.com/StickyBearApiary

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    108

    Default Re: Moving hive a short distance?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sticky Bear View Post
    I move hives anywhere from 2 ft. to 30 ft. within the bee yard without any ill effects, normally early morning or late evening. Bees are more flexible then we give them credit for.
    Arrggg. I had to move mine about 60 feet. I put the hives on a wagon and moved them about 3 feet a day. It was difficult because I ended up having to put supers on and the hives got heavy (plus the wagon got bent). I really wish I had joined this website earlier.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,827

    Default Re: Moving hive a short distance?

    Just move them and put a branch in front of the hive...

    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesmoving.htm#between
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Roy, Wa
    Posts
    1,595

    Default Re: Moving hive a short distance?

    I move my hives a short distance all the time. But there are a few things to know.
    If it is early spring or late fall, the hive is not activly rearing brood and the hive is already light in numbers of bees, Unless the colony can sustain the inevitable loss of some bees, don't move it a short distance.

    Follow Michael Bushes link tips.

    When I move them, sometimes I confine them, sometimes I don't. But always do something to force them to reorient.

    I use 2" aluminum HVAC tape from Home Depot for many things in the bee yard, including covering hive entrances when I do confine, always with more ventilation than you think you'll need.. After the appropriate time, I will just break off a small branch from a Rosemary bush and stick it right through the tape. They still have to work at getting out and orient very well. I have better luck with this since I have been using the rosemary, which is very fragrant. I assume some orientation may also be determined by scent from this observation.
    Don't just take off the tape during flying hours and try to place a branch there or they will come boiling out and not orient well. Stick the branch THROUGH the tape.They'll only be able to get out one at at time for a while until they push a larger opening in the tape. No bees ever get stuck to the tape ether, in case you were wondering.

    Like most things about beekeeping, there are many variables to the technique. If you move your hive with no confinement, most of the foragers Will fly back to the old location...exactly what I want them to do if I've put a weak hive in it's place.
    Last edited by Lauri; 05-22-2013 at 09:38 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Pinellass County, Florida
    Posts
    1,105

    Default Re: Moving hive a short distance?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sticky Bear View Post
    I move hives anywhere from 2 ft. to 30 ft. within the bee yard without any ill effects, normally early morning or late evening. Bees are more flexible then we give them credit for.
    What happens under those condition,"resembles drift"
    In a small apiary or a one 2 or 3 hive yard
    The single moved hive as you explain may take substantial loss
    .
    .
    I feel with Berengaria method your hive will fare well with the move

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Grand Junction, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    231

    Default Re: Moving hive a short distance?

    I have 20 hives in the bee yard. Drift doesn't seem to be an issue but then again I do have Carnies and they are the least likely to drift.

    Quote Originally Posted by tommyt View Post
    What happens under those condition,"resembles drift"
    In a small apiary or a one 2 or 3 hive yard
    The single moved hive as you explain may take substantial loss
    .
    .
    I feel with Berengaria method your hive will fare well with the move
    Jack Moore ~ Sticky Bear Apiary
    Zone 7a ~ Elev: 4840ft. ~ https://www.facebook.com/StickyBearApiary

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