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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    michigan
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    23

    Default methods of mite sampling

    I am familiar with the sugar sampling method, the alcohol (or ether) method, ,the 24 hour sticky board method, and the brood method.

    If one were to photograph 100 bees entering/leaving the hive, and photographic examination showed only 1% of the bees had visible mites, would that tell us anything useful?

    The two issues I see with this method are that mites aren't always in an obvious place on the bee, and I don't know if foraging bees are parasitized at similar rates to nurse bees, or drones.

    Comments?

    thanks in advance,


    troy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Warrior, Alabama
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    1,071

    Default Re: methods of mite sampling

    You nailed the issues?
    Old Guy in Alabama

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Ka'u Hawaii
    Posts
    169

    Default Re: methods of mite sampling

    Visible mites? I have yet to see visible mites on a bee other than in someone's published photographs; however, my bees definitely have mites. And I do frequent inspections.
    In other words, looking for the mites attached to adult bees is not the way to go. Mite sampling and brood inspection are the ways to go.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
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    1,533

    Default Re: methods of mite sampling

    They teach us in bee-class, that acceptable level of mites in alcohol wash is 3%. At the same time, instructor stated that if you could see even one mite on the bee - this is an indication of serious mites problem. I guess, not all mites are "visible" on the bees
    Серёжа, Sergey

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
    Posts
    2,644

    Default Re: methods of mite sampling

    Interesting idea.. but not pratical, what if the mite was on the oppisite side of the bee? what if the same be makes more trips than the other?

    cost??

    Look up Scientific beekeeping By Randy Oliver. he shows you how to do a Alcohol wash or sugar roll

  6. #6

    Default Re: methods of mite sampling

    Mites are strongly drawn by brood pheromones. Sugar and alcohol washes will only give meaningful numbers if the bees sampled are mainly nurse bees taken from brood frames.
    Sometimes I will see mites walking on newly drawn comb that contains larvae. They stand out against the white comb. If you've never seen one walking....you will be amazed at how fast they can move.
    Foraging bees will have a substantially lower infestation rate.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Lititz, PA, USA
    Posts
    710

    Default Re: methods of mite sampling

    Quote Originally Posted by cerezha View Post
    I guess, not all mites are "visible" on the bees
    Was at the ABF conference in Hershey in January and one presenter had a great close up picture of a mite that had crawled between the segments of a bee's abdomen so you could only see a small cresent shaped edge of the mite. I then had the opportunity to witness this in a deadout and am still kicking myself for not taking a picture of it myself before digging the mite out to show the owner of that dead hive.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    23

    Default Re: methods of mite sampling

    OK, I'll stick with sugar sampling.

    The reason I asked is I have a couple of usb "microscopes" that give pretty decent resolution, and I occasionally spy on the bees through little ports that I have drilled in the hives.

    The though occurred to me about other uses, like monitoring the entrance and reviewing for mites.

    Oh well, we already have good sampling techniques.


    finest regards,

    troy

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