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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Edinburgh, UK
    Posts
    223

    Default Large pesticide bee-kill in minnesota

    Steve Ellis serves as Secretary of the National HoneyBee Advisory Board and is a large scale bee-farmer
    He placed 1,312 of his hives Minnesota in his normal bee-yard territory. A nearby farm planted corn a few days later and the dust - presumably clothianidin (used on 90%+ of American corn as seed treatment) blew around and contaminated willows and other plants the bees were foraging on. The kill started on May 7th and Steve is still waiting results of tests. He is certain it was the neonics in the corn planted dust.

    I asked him how many of the 1,312 hives were affected and he said 'all of them'.

    Doesn't yet know ho many of the contaminated hives will collapse completely but he says it is already a 'massive depopulation' event. He wrote:

    "1,312 hives were on that location, all were affected. Impossible to estimate % of population of each hive killed as yet. Suffice to say it was a severe depopulation event."

    From: Steve Ellis
    Date: 15 May 2013 22:57:29 GMT+01:00


    Dear All,

    Below is a video link to a short You Tube piece which my newly hired bee keeper in training-photographer spliced together, showing the bee injury associated with corn planting of neo nics.

    http://youtu.be/xxXXaILuK5s

    The Minnesota Dept of Agriculture, Bayer, Bee Informed Partnership, and Penn State are all currently working on getting samples analyzed for chemical residues.

    Picture is worth a thousand words. James did a nice job of filming and editing. Voice is mine.

    Steve Ellis

    National Honey bee Advisory Board website is here:

    http://www.nhbab.com/members.html


    NHBAB Board Members for 2012

    Bret Adee, Co-Chair Dave Hackenberg

    Bruce, SD Lewisberg, PA


    Steve Ellis, Secretary Jim Frazier, Scientific Advisor

    Barrett, MN Penn State University PA

    AHPA MEMBERS ABF MEMBERS


    Jeff Anderson Jim Doan

    Eagle Bend, MN Hamlin, NY


    Rick Smith David Mendes

    Yuma, AZ N. Fort Mylers, FL


    Randy Verhoek Tim Tucker

    Bismarck ND Niotaze, KS

    You can email any member of the NHBAB via a form on that web page.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camarillo, CA, USA
    Posts
    322

    Default Re: Large pesticide bee-kill in minnesota

    Just posting to keep this up, hope we get follow up info on results of testing

  3. #3

    Default Re: Large pesticide bee-kill in minnesota

    That is just sad. Hopefully your work along with others will finally help resolve this neonics issue.
    Ken Barber - Started beekeeping in 2013 and having a blast
    www.barberberryfarm.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon USA
    Posts
    323

    Default Re: Large pesticide bee-kill in minnesota

    Even if test results aren't "conclusive," I would really hope that the US will follow the EU and place a temporary ban on these substances until more research can be done. Given Steve's credentials and the video documentation of the incident, this is a game-changer IMHO......

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Sacramento, Calif. USA
    Posts
    267

    Default Re: Large pesticide bee-kill in minnesota

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDawg View Post
    Given Steve's credentials and the video documentation of the incident, this is a game-changer IMHO......
    Steve made a big deal about an alledged planter dust kill 12 months ago: http://www.nbcnews.com/video/nightly...79683#47379683 There was a follow up investigation back then, so why havn't we been told about the results? Is it because neonics were not detected in the dying bees?

    And if Steve sincerely believes planter dust killed his bees last year, why did he put them in harms way again this year? Why didn't he talk to his corn farmer neighbors to find out when they would be planting this year so he could move his bees away from the fields? Why didn't Steve shoot video and even a photo of his neighbors planting this past season to document alot of dust was being kicked up? Normally there is not much dust kicked up unless the soil is dry and the wind is blowing rather strongly. Why is Steve the only beekeeper in that region of Minnesota alledging planter dust kills?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon USA
    Posts
    323

    Default Re: Large pesticide bee-kill in minnesota

    http://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/resea...rupkeBees.html

    "Analyses of bees found dead in and around hives from several apiaries over two years in Indiana showed the presence of neonicotinoid insecticides, which are commonly used to coat corn and soybean seeds before planting. The research showed that those insecticides were present at high concentrations in waste talc that is exhausted from farm machinery during planting.

    The insecticides clothianidin and thiamethoxam were also consistently found at low levels in soil - up to two years after treated seed was planted - on nearby dandelion flowers and in corn pollen gathered by the bees, according to the findings released in the journal PLoS One this month.

    "We know that these insecticides are highly toxic to bees; we found them in each sample of dead and dying bees," said Christian Krupke, associate professor of entomology and a co-author of the findings."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon USA
    Posts
    323

    Default Re: Large pesticide bee-kill in minnesota

    http://www.extension.org/pages/65034...ney-bee-health

    "In the spring of 2010 we became aware of it when we saw dead bees in front of most of the Purdue bee hives during the week that corn was being planted nearby. Conditions were hot (85°F), dry and windy and clouds of dust were kicked up by the planters – a common sight throughout the Midwest in early spring. We tested bees that were dying in front of hives near agricultural fields and also healthy hives. The dead bees had clothianidin and several other seed treatment chemicals in or on their bodies. Most of the bees that were dying were actually the nurse bees that may have consumed pollen that was being collected from dandelions and other flowering plants in the area. We saw the characteristic color of dandelion pollen on most of the foragers. Pollen collected by returning foragers and pollen sampled from the cells of those hives had about 10 times the level of clothianidin and thiamethoxam as compared to that detected in the dead bees."

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    2,605

    Default Re: Large pesticide bee-kill in minnesota

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueDiamond View Post
    Steve made a big deal about an alledged planter dust kill 12 months ago: http://www.nbcnews.com/video/nightly...79683#47379683 There was a follow up investigation back then, so why havn't we been told about the results? Is it because neonics were not detected in the dying bees?

    And if Steve sincerely believes planter dust killed his bees last year, why did he put them in harms way again this year? Why didn't he talk to his corn farmer neighbors to find out when they would be planting this year so he could move his bees away from the fields? Why didn't Steve shoot video and even a photo of his neighbors planting this past season to document alot of dust was being kicked up? Normally there is not much dust kicked up unless the soil is dry and the wind is blowing rather strongly. Why is Steve the only beekeeper in that region of Minnesota alledging planter dust kills?
    Why should Steve had to do anything. Why didn't the farmer inform Steve of his intent to plant? Why didn't the farmer take due care in preventing the insecticide coating his seed from being spread. Why doesn't the farmer move his field of corn?
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

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