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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    24

    Default What kind of stand?

    What kind of stand does everyone use?

    I have my hive set up on top of some sawhorses right now, which seems to be fine, but feels a little temporary. I'd like to avoid screwing legs directly onto the hive - I'm probably going to be shuffling them around my yard a bit and I'm not sure there's any leg combination that would work well for every spot in my yard they might end up (irregular combination of hilly-ness).

    Should I just stick with the sawhorses? Cinderblocks? Something else?

    There's not a big issue keeping them level on the sawhorses, I have them wedged up, and with bricks on top I doubt they're going anywhere (my yard isn't too windy anyways). I suppose I'm mostly worried I'm going to clumsily bump into the sawhorses and knock everything over.

    I saw some nice photos of hanging top-bars in africa (google "elephant fence bee"), maybe that would be a good route to go once my yard is a little more settled?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wilkesboro, NC
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: What kind of stand?

    New beek here, but i use cinderblocks and all the beekeepers i know use cinderblocks.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    98

    Default Re: What kind of stand?

    I have my top bar hives on legs, like so

    http://urbanbackyardedibles.com/word...p_bar_hive.jpg
    (not my hive, but like it)

    Being hunched over working a hive could hurt after awhile

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Oxford, MS
    Posts
    50

    Default Re: What kind of stand?

    I made mine out of 4x4 treated post.... strong enough to hold 5 hives and still load it on the trailer or truck if i want to move it




  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Midland, MI
    Posts
    504

    Default Re: What kind of stand?

    I framed my stand for out of 2x4-8' boards. this rectangular framework is elevated atop cinderblocks. i have it set up to hold 3 stacks of hives, and in the spaces between them, i added additional cross braces that are spaced perfectly to act as frame rests. so, when i remove frames, i can set them into the hive stand so they are not banged around or leaning at odd angles when I'm working the rest of the hive.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Baytown, TX., USA.
    Posts
    646

    Default Re: What kind of stand?

    I use Cinderblocks and you can see that I developed an ant problem on this weak hive. To fix that I added short 2x2 treated wood legs as you can see. I will build a neater support that has legs that can be set into water cups to block ants but this quicky is working. You can see that I have done a newspaper combine of a nuc to this hive. I lost ( or killed) the queen.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/77932428@N05/8699467780/
    Julysun elevation 23 feet. 4 Hives, 2 years.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Denison, Texas
    Posts
    510

    Default Re: What kind of stand?

    I use legs. You can put bricks or blocks under them to level them out if you're on a hillside. http://s1066.photobucket.com/user/St...03201416558602

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Murray KY, USA
    Posts
    263

    Default Re: What kind of stand?

    I used legs on mine (TBH) as well. For TBH, I's day that legs are the best way to have unobstructed work access to the hive without bumping into any others. For Langs, I'd do similar (if not exactly) to what Dconrad did with a max of 5 hives per base stand.

    </2cents>

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