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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Olean, NY, US
    Posts
    25

    Default Lost a hive - evidence doesn't point to any disease I read about.

    I've been keeping a few hives for about 5 years and lost my first one this spring. It came out of our very long winter weak, but still had activity. Over the last week or so, the activity fell greatly, so I opened it today and only found only a couple hundred bees still alive. The queen was one of them. They seemed slow and wandering. The other bees were not paying any attention to the queen. There was probably 50 lbs of honey still in the hive.

    What I'm guessing is larva, was all dead and uncapped. The cells had a white grainy looking substance in them. I don't know if this was just a stage of decomposition, but they were still very white. There were very few cells where something had decomposed to the point of turning yellow, and they were all on one side of one frame. I didn't see anything that looked like capped brood.

    Any ideas?
    Steve

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Baden Wurtemburg Germany
    Posts
    137

    Default Re: Lost a hive - evidence doesn't point to any disease I read about.

    could you post a picture of the yellow and the white grainy stuff.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Olean, NY, US
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Lost a hive - evidence doesn't point to any disease I read about.

    This is the best I could come up with, but it's not accurate for color. The flash caused everything to look very yellowish. The substance in the cells is snow white.

    hiveDead3.jpg
    Steve

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    5,838

    Default Re: Lost a hive - evidence doesn't point to any disease I read about.

    Honey in a hive can granulate and end up looking like that if the bees cannot look after it, I think that's what it is. Can you do a pic of a comb with sealed brood & open brood?
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,320

    Default Re: Lost a hive - evidence doesn't point to any disease I read about.

    Looks like granulated honey, or dried sugar syrup. I see it all the time. The bees can't eat it unless they have access to water, too.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Cupertino, CA, USA
    Posts
    280

    Default Re: Lost a hive - evidence doesn't point to any disease I read about.

    I had a hive die similarly where they dwindled down to nothing but had a queen all along. I just assumed that the queen got old and stopped laying and the workers stuck with her because they "had a queen".

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