Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Seneca Falls, NY
    Posts
    44

    Default Frozen honey frames

    The other day it was just warm enough for me to check the hives. One hive was dead so I took the opportunity to clean it all up and get it ready for spring. This left me several frames of honey that I put into two supers and put a telescoping board on top and bottom to keep varmits out.


    My question is IF the honey crystallizes in the comb, can it be thawed out later? Will just leaving it in doors for several days turn it back into honey?

    If not how do you heat it up without melting the comb?

    Right now it is so cold out that I doubt it will, but I just want to know just in case.

    If it does crystallize and there is no way to return it to its normal state (while in the comb) can I use the crystallized honey as food in the early spring?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,182

    Default Re: Frozen honey frames

    Honey in a comb doesn't crystallize just from being frozen. In fact, freezing combs in a freezer is one way to prevent crystallization (at least while it is in the freezer).

    So honey frozen outdoors should be OK if the honey was OK before it got frozen.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Seneca Falls, NY
    Posts
    44

    Default Re: Frozen honey frames

    I dont think it will but if on the off chance it does, I was just wondering if anybody had this happen and if it could be rectified.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    4,000

    Default Re: Frozen honey frames

    If the honey was from fall flowers like sunflowers or goldenrod, chances are it will or has sugared. Your best use of it is in your live beehive where it will help produce more bees if it is solid. Some folks also put the crystalized honey box on a bottom board with an excluder over it and then move the broodnest and super on top. That way the bees move the honey up above the brood nest into new storage liquified where it can be extracted.

    It happens to everyone and is not a disaster except for some commercial guy who has ended up with hundreds of supers with crystalized unextractable honey.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    145

    Default Re: Frozen honey frames

    I have the same problem. Will try the technique suggested by Vance. Wonder if, when there is honey flow like now, the bees won't trouble with the crystallized stuff, and maybe it will be moved around more in the lull after the late flow. I'm going to try it anyway - don't know what else to do with all my frames. I probably have two or three boxes worth.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads