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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Richmond, VA UNITED STATES
    Posts
    163

    Default Did she miss her chance to mate?

    I vaguely remember reading something about new queens getting stuck in a hive due to bad weather, and then start laying drones. I can't remember the source though. I had a situation where I had a new queen I thought was mated from one of my mating nucs, and I put her in a cage and then put her in a hive that I had just performed a cutout on. It was unique in that they were cut out right after they swarmed, so there was no brood or eggs, just several just opened queen cells. Basically I created a package.

    However, I got busy and forgot about her. I released her about day 3 I think, and then we've had nothing but nonstop rain for almost 5 days.

    I checked her, and she's walking around on the comb, but no eggs.

    Is there a time limit, or could she go out on a mating flight 3 weeks after hatching?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Default Re: Did she miss her chance to mate?

    http://www.bushfarms.com/huber.htm#i...ectstheovaries

    "My experiments at that time were not sufficiently numerous; but they have since been so often repeated, and the result so uniform, that I no longer hesitate to announce, as a certain discovery, the singularities which retarded fecundation, produces on the ovaries of the queen. If she receives the male during the first fifteen days of her life, she remains capable of laying both the eggs of workers and of drones; but should fecundation be retarded until the twenty-second day, her ovaries are vitiated in such a manner that she becomes unfit for laying the eggs of workers, and will produce only those of drones...

    "I should also describe the very remarkable manner in which queens, that lay only the eggs of drones, sometimes deposit them in the cells. Instead of being placed in the lozenges forming the bottom, they are frequently deposited on the lower side of the cells, two lines (2/12ths in.=4.2mm) from the mouth. This arises from the body of such queens being shorter than that of those whose fecundation has not been retarded. The extremity remains slender, while the first two rings next the thorax are uncommonly swollen. Thus, in disposing themselves for laying, the extremity cannot reach the bottom of the cells on account of the swollen rings; consequently the eggs must remain attached to the part that the extremity reaches. The worms proceeding from them pass their vermicular state in the same place where the eggs were deposited, which proves that bees are not charged with the care of transporting the eggs as has been supposed. "--François Huber, New Observations on the Natural History Of Bees Volume I
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Richmond, VA UNITED STATES
    Posts
    163

    Default Re: Did she miss her chance to mate?

    Thanks Michael. I actually have Huber's book, which I bought directly from you when you were up here in Richmond. That may be what I was recalling. I did notice that she's got that particular look. A virgin queen looks like a stretched out worker in some respects. A mated queen is an obvious stretched out fat bee. However this queen is fat for the first half and then quickly tapers. She doesn't have the thickness that goes all the way down to her ovipositor.

    I started some more queen cells in my Nicot box last night. By the time those are ready, I should know whether or not this queen is a dud.

    Rob
    www.mongrelbees.com

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