Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Benton county, Arkansas
    Posts
    809

    Default Feeding Pollen sub powder inside the hive?

    Reading George Imirie's pages and I quote, "Now you can understand why I start feeding 1:1 sugar syrup or 1:2 thinner sugar syrup + pollen substitute (I spread 3-4 tablespoons of Mann Lake Bee-Pro on frame tops) to my bees early in February."

    Will they actually take it? I thought they would take it out as trash like they do with granulated sugar.
    Anyone have experience doing this?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    3,336

    Default Re: Feeding Pollen sub powder inside the hive?

    >Will they actually take it?

    Yes, but much of it will bee spread all over the bottom and make a mess and attracts bugs.

    If you feed dry pollen open feed it. otherwise put in in patties or syrup.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    New Albany, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    854

    Default Re: Feeding Pollen sub powder inside the hive?

    I have seen and tried this too. Unfortunately, my bees seem to waste of good bit of dry sub when fed this way. A good patty seems to work much better IMHO.
    Breeder Queens & Honey Bee Nutritional Supplements
    www.latshawapiaries.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Ridgeville, SC, USA
    Posts
    418

    Default Re: Feeding Pollen sub powder inside the hive?

    Makes a mess as stated. I don't use pollen patties because of shb. I made some bucket feeders to open feed pollen substitute. My bees have been going nuts over it for a while now. When I introduce it to a new yard I put a bucket feeder of sugar syrup close by. I only have to do the syrup 1 time then the bees are all over the pollen substitute. We usually have pollen year round but I use the substitute to increase protein levels and compensate for wet rainy times.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    5,212

    Default Re: Feeding Pollen sub powder inside the hive?

    Patties are cleaner but in my area, the timing is about right. I've seen warm days in late February or early March where workers are already bringing in pollen. We have so many posts here discussing feeding pollen / protein and we don't talk about timing often enough (IMHO). If my queens get the timing right, they are increasing brood in my area about that time so adding pollen in any form is not a bad thing. Too much earlier and it's a waste even if we "feel better" by feeding them. If it were me, I'd opt for patties but if I did't have the time to make them from my pollen or pollen sub, then I'd dry feed them and let them do as they may with it.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    51,460

    Default Re: Feeding Pollen sub powder inside the hive?

    I like to open feed pollen dry. But yes, in my experience they haul it out for trash if I put it dry in the hive...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM, U.S.
    Posts
    116

    Default Re: Feeding Pollen sub powder inside the hive?

    I have even tried to keep it neat by placing on an index card over the frames; then they ignore it/haul the whole thing out, depending on the hive. Patty sandwich in wax paper is gold- but we are blessed not to have SHB.

    Ravenseye, do you have a bio-indicator you go by for timing? Carpel buds on trees, average daily high, etc.?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    5,212

    Default Re: Feeding Pollen sub powder inside the hive?

    Quote Originally Posted by Outdoor N8 View Post
    Ravenseye, do you have a bio-indicator you go by for timing? Carpel buds on trees, average daily high, etc.?
    Nope. I rough calculate it out. I expect "some" pollen in early March. So, in my area, I figure my queens are starting to ramp up brood by the end of January. If I want to start feeding, I do it then even if they initially ignore it. I'm not a huge fan of feeding pollen but if I do, I start in late January and don't stop until the bees are hauling in lots of it. In my opinion, starting and then stopping is far worse that not feeding at all.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads