Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    1

    Default New Guy Looking For Information

    Good Day,

    I a currently living in Alaska, but will be moving to Bremerton, WA late summer, early fall of this year. I plan on having at least one hive on the property, once I move to WA. I believe in plenty of research before I start into any venture and so this has been no different. I have found out, that Stedman's Bee Supplies will be my local supplier, as well as local organization location. I have been reading a lot of information Mr. Bush has put out, and believe that information to be advantageous to follow. I see a lot of people using sugar syrup to feed new hives on start up even though the information I have read is that it's too alkaline and has a detrimental affect on reproduction. Why are people using it instead of honey and pollen? How do I know that my bee supplier is providing quality queens, and not those commercially grown? It hasn't been stated straight out, so I am assuming, would I need to have mostly small sized comb frames for the workers and a couple of large combed frames for the Drones in one Super? I am sure that this is only the beginning of the questions I will ask. Thank you for your time. I'm sure that this will shape up to be an excellent hobby to start out my military retirement, along with the Ham Radio.

    Thank you again.

    Jeff

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Greenbrae, CA, USA
    Posts
    335

    Default Re: New Guy Looking For Information

    1) Sugar syrup is cheap and easy, and as far as I know has no harmful effects. If it did, it wouldn't be as widely used. Sure, honey is probably better... but most of us want to use or sell the honey we produce. Likewise, few people have pollen sitting around to feed to their bees.

    2) Why would commercially grown queens necessarily be of poor quality? It's all about the reputation of the supplier. Ask around your local groups, or use some of the well-discussed suppliers you'll see on these boards.

    3) There are several options of frames to use (foundationless, small cell, drone comb, etc). Don't worry much about this as a beginner as the bees will take care of it on their own. Most of us just use one type (often standard plastic foundation) and the bees will create whatever drone comb they need. Wait till you have more experience, then you can play around with some alternatives.

    Normally you start hives in the spring so you'll have plenty of time to research after your move.

    Welcome to bees - you'll have fun!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    127

    Default Re: New Guy Looking For Information

    I have been reading a lot of information Mr. Bush has put out, and believe that information to be advantageous to follow. I see a lot of people using sugar syrup to feed new hives on start up even though the information I have read is that it's too alkaline and has a detrimental affect on reproduction. Why are people using it instead of honey and pollen?
    It's meant to start a new package of bees off because they will have nothing to start with. It's not meant for long term feeding and only in emergencies like in a nectar dearth.

    How do I know that my bee supplier is providing quality queens, and not those commercially grown?
    Ask them.

    It hasn't been stated straight out, so I am assuming, would I need to have mostly small sized comb frames for the workers and a couple of large combed frames for the Drones in one Super?
    Thats if your running pure foundation, I cant speak to that because I run foundationless, that way I dont worry about cell size, the bees do.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Baker Oregon
    Posts
    2,372

    Default Re: New Guy Looking For Information

    Quote Originally Posted by Washington Yankee View Post
    Why are people using it instead of honey and pollen? How do I know that my bee supplier is providing quality queens, and not those commercially grown? It hasn't been stated straight out, so I am assuming, would I need to have mostly small sized comb frames for the workers and a couple of large combed frames for the Drones in one Super?
    Honey from an unknown source can have disease you don't want, namely AFB. Bees will supply their own pollen, some people feed to stimulate early build up. You can run small cell if you want, I think the jury is still out on it (however I am trying it as I can not see any harm in doing so). As for drones I add a couple of foundationless frames in each box and let them do as they will.
    Dan Hayden 4 Years. 9 hives. Tx Free. USDA Zone 5b.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,115

    Default Re: New Guy Looking For Information

    > I see a lot of people using sugar syrup to feed new hives on start up even though the information I have read is that it's too alkaline and has a detrimental affect on reproduction. Why are people using it instead of honey and pollen?

    My main reason for using sugar syrup IF i feed, is that honey sets off too much robbing and I work too hard to collect and extract it to just feed it all back. My main reason for LEAVING them honey is that it is what is best for them, it does not set off robbing (which even sugar syrup contributes to somewhat) and I don't have to extract it. As far as pollen, I seldom feed it (but sometimes do in the fall if there is a serious dearth and I'm concerned about young bees for the winter). I never feed substitute. If I'm really desperate for enough pollen to feed, I might mix it 50:50 with some substitute or some soy flour, but I try not to find myself in that position.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads