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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Bristow, VA
    Posts
    6

    Default Help for first inspection

    Greetings,

    Sorry if this appears as a duplicate post as i thought i posted it earlier but i dont see it. I rec's my first package this week and upon inspection of the queen cage, I do not know if my queen is alive. Odd i know!There was a dead bee in the queen cage with its body tucked into he exit hole. The three remaining bees in the queen cage were fine and none appeared larger than others. One did have a noticibaly darker abdomen. I tried to move the dead bee to see her but was unable to do so. Therefore i do not know if the dead bee was an attendant or the queen. I went ahead and put the bees and cage in the hive (cork removed)

    My hive is located 4 hours away so i will conduct the first inspection this Saturday. This is a new TB with no comb and the queen was not marked. I have sugar syrup in the hive as well. Assuming the bees in the queen cage have been released after three days what should I look for to determine if my queen is alive? I understand i can look for eggs in the cells but any advice on other signs positive or negative would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Quad Cities, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    16

    Default Re: Help for first inspection

    Without finding the queen, looking for eggs and larva is your only choice. Eggs and larva are a good positive sign that you have a queen. The eggs will be in the center of the cell, and the larva will have a bit of "wetness" around them. Look at some pictures online to get an idea of what to look for.
    Last edited by adamziegler; 05-02-2013 at 06:19 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
    Posts
    1,549

    Default Re: Help for first inspection

    Do yourself a favor and take pictures or any comb in the hive. I can't see eggs to save my life, and any comb is going to be so white that you will probably have a problem seeing brood (larva) as well. If you cake a camera or camera phone and take pictures you can blow them up and easily see the brood or eggs.

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