Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Argh!

  1. #1

    Default Argh!

    So this is the start of season four for me, and it's frustrating. I'm trying a hands off approach, not working. :/

    Year 1: 3 hives: one failed mid season, one honeybound, one good. Screwed up a combine towards the end when the honeybound swarmed late and I tried to make the two into one before snow.
    Year 2: Bad weather year in the Northeast, no swarms caught.
    Year 3. HUGE swarm in May with HUGE buildup, small swarm in late june.

    Now, I expected the small swarm not to make it through the winter, but what I didn't expect was the HUGE TBH that had a GALLON OF HONEY left to be fine last week, and empty this week.

    Like, gone gone. No dead bees, no mites, no foul brood, only normal amounts of inter-bar wax moth cocoons, no wax moth larvae in the hive, two or three dozen capped brood cells - a few with hatchlings dead on the way out of the cells.

    Is this CCD? Am I missing something?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Baden Wurtemburg Germany
    Posts
    129

    Default Re: Argh!

    No mites? Are you sure? Did you treat and if so did you check that it was successful.

    "two or three dozen capped brood cells - a few with hatchlings dead on the way out of the cells." sounds like mites to me.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Calhoun Co, Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,310

    Default Re: Argh!

    I've read that neonics caused a LOT of hives to be "depopulated" due to exposure of bees flying through corn fields where "treated" (read: contaminated) seed was being handled/planted last year. Not sure that could explain all of what you're describing, but maybe part? Are there any farmers planting corn in your area yet (sorry, don't know when "planting time" is in NY...we have fields around here that are already 3-4' high)? Also, you say it was a "huge swarm" ... which leads me to believe that it *may* have been from an absconding before (like a swarm, but pretty much everybody leaves, not just half)...where they any disturbances to the hive that may have caused them to abscond again, assuming they were a strain that's especially prone to that behavior?

  4. #4

    Default Re: Argh!

    Very interesting. Yes, it was a huge swarm about this time last year. AND - They were under someone's eves when I retrieved them and had started building open comb! I never thought about it but yes, perhaps it's somewhere in their genetic mutation to 100% swarm only.

    Hmmmm

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Calhoun Co, Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,310

    Default Re: Argh!

    Idk about a genetic "mutation"...but I do know that certain strains have a much higher likelihood of absconding. The AHB around where I am are really likely to do it, even late in the year, which is the main thing that keeps them from being able to survive & propagate up North. That said, if a strain were to abscond early in the spring, like right now in NY, then they'd be moving with plenty of time to build back up; absconding, however isn't *quite* the same as swarming. There's usually a reason why they found their current home deficient if they're absconding (reason to the bees, not necessarily one we would understand lol), whereas swarming is honey bees' form of reproduction. To keep the strain going, they have to swarm; absconding, however, can be bred out without risk of creating a "dead strain"

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads