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  1. #561
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    6,015

    Default Re: Going Treatment Free - step 1

    All my questions? No.

    Perhaps I'll dribble them in one question, one post, at a time.

    But good pic of you working the hive with no veil. All the bees are that gentle?
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

  2. #562
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    North Liberty, IN
    Posts
    344

    Default Re: Going Treatment Free - step 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldtimer View Post
    All my questions? No.

    Perhaps I'll dribble them in one question, one post, at a time.

    But good pic of you working the hive with no veil. All the bees are that gentle?
    If not that gentle, I don't hestitate to kill the queen. Haven't done so in a few years.

  3. #563
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New York City, NY
    Posts
    4,317

    Default Re: Going Treatment Free - step 1

    Tim:

    The USDA AHB test is a morphometric test. It tells you if the bees in question are actual AHB or not.

    It isn't a genetic test per se. Those are different, like the satellite markers used in the Pinto study. Even those kinds of tests can't really tell which kind of African genetics are there. They could be African, like the Spanish black bees, for instance.

    In short, the available tests are limited in what they can tell you about the genetics of feral stock.

    That's a point that Paul McCarty made in that above link.
    Last edited by WLC; 09-02-2013 at 08:07 PM.

  4. #564
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    North Liberty, IN
    Posts
    344

    Default Re: Going Treatment Free - step 1

    Quote Originally Posted by WLC View Post
    Tim:

    The USDA AHB test is a morphometric test. It tells you if the bees in question are actual AHB or not.

    It isn't a genetic test per se. Those are different, like the satellite markers used in the Pinto study. Even those kinds of tests can't really tell which kind of African genetics are there. They could be Tunisian, like the Spanish black bees, for instance.

    In short, the available tests are limited in what they can tell you about the genetics of feral stock.

    That's a point that Paul McCarty made in that above link.
    My usual responce when questioned on race is... The live ones.
    There's such a mix. Couple years ago caught a swarm that was definitely Cordovan. Got a few swarms out of the City of South Bend, which up until July this year was illegal to keep bees unless you owned 5 acres. All them swarms have been predominantly darker bees. So??? Don't really know....

  5. #565
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New York City, NY
    Posts
    4,317

    Default Re: Going Treatment Free - step 1

    Just call them feral (or hybrid swarm) bees. Especially if they act like ferals.

    If they're domestic Honeybees, it will be apparent.

    The difference is how they behave when you work them.

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