Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 22 of 22
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Spokane, Washington USA
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: 8 frame vs 10 frame: and....go!

    I use 10 frame boxes with 9 frames in them spaced evenly. It's enough room to root around in there without disturbing the bees too much but not enough for them to make a bunch of bur comb down the sides.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,408

    Default Re: 8 frame vs 10 frame: and....go!

    >I use 10 frame boxes with 9 frames in them spaced evenly.

    And I use 8 frame boxes with 9 frames in them. Tightly together in the center.

    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesframewidth.htm
    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfaqs.htm#framespacing

    From the inventor of the self-spacing frame:

    "If we space the combs from center to center 1 1/2 inches, instead of 1 3/8, then we have an empty space of 5/8 inch between two combs of brood instead of 1/2, as it ought to be; and it will certainly require more bees to fill and keep warm a 5/8 than a 1/2 inch space. In a 1/2 inch space, the breeding bees from two combs facing each other will join with their backs, and so close up the space between the two brood combs. If this space is widened to 5/8 the bees cannot do this, and more bees will be required to keep up the needed brood- rearing temperature. What a drawback this would be in a cool spring, when our colonies are still weak in numbers, yet breeding most desirable, can readily be understood."--Julius Hoffman

    "...if the space is insufficient, the bees shorten the cells on the side of one comb, thus rendering that side useless; and if placed more than the usual width, it requires a greater amount of bees to cover the brood, as also to raise the temperature to the proper degree for building comb, Second, when the combs are too widely spaced, the bees while refilling them with stores, lengthen the cells and thus make the comb thick and irregular--the application of the knife is then the only remedy to reduce them to proper thickness."--J.S. Harbison, The bee-keeper's directory pg 32

    It is the irregularity of the thickness of the comb that bothers me with wider spacing in the brood nest, not to mention that they will be more likely to do the fins or the comb out from the face of the foundation with wider spacing. At 1 1/4" they hardly ever do. IMO, frames should always be tightly together unless they are DRAWN comb and they are in the supers.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads