Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 29 of 29
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Campbell River, BC, CA
    Posts
    526

    Default Re: Which extractor???

    Quote Originally Posted by WBVC View Post

    All ideas and comments welcome including who to purchase from.
    Save yourself a ton of hassle on the import / shipping, buy it in bc. The folks at bees and glass just up the road from us deal in all the Mann lake stuff, and I'm sure they can figure out cost effective delivery. When I asked Larry about pricing for an extractor last week, he pointed to the price in the catalog, picked up locally here in Duncan, no extra shipping. I'm sure they have it figured out for Vancouver delivery.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Cambridge, MD, USA
    Posts
    110

    Default Re: Which extractor???

    Same here; looking for an extractor, however, for me there are a couple of different things,

    First, I won't be buying it ! My Uncle went in with his son in-law on 2 hives, but they died over the winter. He originally said he would buy the extractor and has re-affirmed to me that he will still do so because he plans on having bee's in the future; up to 10 hives himself...I have only 4 ATM but might expand to six but no more.

    Second, he doesn't mind spending money for a better product, i.e. if one extractor has a better motor but costs $100 more, he'd get the better one.

    So with that in mind, which extractor would fit better in that criteria? From my limited knowledge, looks like the Maxant Power 9F is the one.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,379

    Default Re: Which extractor???

    Depends on how big you want to go. The 20 frame Dadant will do 20 deeps or 32 mediums.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,293

    Default Re: Which extractor???

    Thanks..I will look them up. Given this is our first year I am thinking we may not need an extractor at all for a bit. As a newbie I was thinking OMG much be ready for all that honey but now in reality I wondering if I shouldn't leave it for he bees their first winter putting up with someone so inexperienced! ..but then next year...another story Thanks for pointing me to local folks.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Palermo, Maine, USA
    Posts
    731

    Default Re: Which extractor???

    Quote Originally Posted by Ross View Post
    Look on craigslist and other such sites for a used one.
    If you find one, act fast. They do not hang around for long!
    Like us on facebook This is the place to bee!
    Ralph

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Seneca Falls, NY
    Posts
    44

    Default Re: Which extractor???

    I have the Mann lake 18/9 and it works great. A lot of people say it is not strong (as opposed too a thicker walled maxant). WELL just today (5-13-13) I was driving down the road in my pickup, minding my own business, when at around 58 miles per hour, I noticed my extractor doing a triple Lindy in the rear view mirror. When I got out of the truck and looked at her I was surprised to find that it only had one bent leg and One dent in the upper rim of the tank. I went to the shop and took the leg off and bent it back and then I took out the basket and used a hammer and a couple blocks of wood to take out the dent in the rim... Works good as new. it seems pretty strong to me...

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Summerfield, NC
    Posts
    67

    Default Re: Which extractor???

    Bottles or jars should be on the list in the first post, but I'd also throw in a recommendation on a couple of food-grade plastic buckets. Even with only five hives, you can still end up with a sizable amount of honey. If you don't have the time or the space to bottle hundreds of jars of honey, you can go ahead and store it safely in the buckets, and quickly return the wet supers to the hive, so the bees can clean them up and get a little more stores for the winter. I'd rather fill six or eight buckets, and fill the jars as needed, rather than trying to bottle four hundred jars of honey in one night.

    If I were the thread starter, I would get what I wanted that would suit my current needs and expansion plans, but I wouldn't spend a fortune on an extractor with that number of hives. We generally run around twenty hives, but winter deaths (and the passing of our beekeeping patriarch) has forced us to scale down to six. We do fine with an ancient nine-frame radial; even though there are two of us, we really don't uncap the frames that much faster than the third man can load it, flip the switch to spin them out, and unload the empties. I'd leave the cappings scratcher off the list...the one we have never gets used, and a kitchen fork will do just fine. The tip of the heated knife will easily get the corners, in any case.

    A large sheet of plastic from a home improvement center spread across the floor will eliminate mopping in the event of a spill. If you are going to be standing on a cement garage floor the entire day, throw a few sheets of cardboard under it, and your feet will thank you.

    We keep a few wet washcloths laying around to cool the knife, because the knife gets too hot in our opinion.

    You said your storage area is limited. If you plan on storing the jars in a different location than your extracting room, build a few crates and get a cheap hand-truck, so you won't have to make dozens of trips carrying the honey. Make sure everything fits through the doorway before doing any major work or spending money.

    I give every frame a nudge the day before I rob the supers from the bees to help eliminate dripping, but it's a good idea to keep a hive tool in the extraction area, anyways...no matter how soon it's been since you pulled the frame, propolis is the glue that always sticks.

    Speaking of propolis, if you save it, remember to bring something in which to store it. Also, remember a bucket for wet cappings, after they have drained.

    Our honey house is plumbed, but in years past we took a supply of clean water to wash the jars off after they were filled. Put the labels on last, and make sure you wash your hands first or wear latex gloves, so you don't get fingerprints on the paper.

    The most important thing in our extraction area is a box of plastic spoons. None of us has the willpower to hold out for very long, without sampling the goods.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Marysville, WA
    Posts
    477

    Default Re: Which extractor???

    Quote Originally Posted by millerdrr View Post
    The most important thing in our extraction area is a box of plastic spoons. None of us has the willpower to hold out for very long, without sampling the goods.
    Now that is some solid advice right there!

    Mike
    Beekeeper? Shoot, my bees keep me!
    100 hives in Western Wa State

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Harrisonburg Va
    Posts
    172

    Default Re: Which extractor???

    They have ...they're called grandkids.....cheaper than a motor on my handcranked maxant...

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads