Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Udall, KS USA
    Posts
    17

    Default What exactly is considered honey flow and how do you remove Terramycin?

    And how long will I be a newbie?!

    The directions say to remove terramycin dust six weeks before honey flow. When exactly would that be?? There's already a full super on my hive left from winter. And how can you remove it when it's sprinkled in there?
    Too much to learn!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Cookeville, TN, USA
    Posts
    4,080

    Default Re: What exactly is considered honey flow and how do you remove Terramycin?

    You should talk to experienced local bee keepers about what and when your local flows occur. I would guess that you are already too late to do anything 6 weeks before your spring flow. But the point is that the honey won't be fit for human consumption during that period. Why are you using it?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Udall, KS USA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: What exactly is considered honey flow and how do you remove Terramycin?

    Quote Originally Posted by David LaFerney View Post
    You should talk to experienced local bee keepers about what and when your local flows occur. I would guess that you are already too late to do anything 6 weeks before your spring flow. But the point is that the honey won't be fit for human consumption during that period. Why are you using it?
    I had two of three hives die over the winter, one apparently froze, all the bees were laying on the bottom dead. The other one had no bees in it. It had a few scattered closed brood cells, and had a slight appearance of foul brood, tiny holes in a few of the brood cells, mush inside. My husband says if they die in the cell won't they decompose and turn mushy anyway? I wondered if we just lost a queen in that hive and they all died out, as we saw bees flying around the opening on warm days in Feb. I hate to think we had foul brood.

    I ordered new packages, and was given the advice to treat with terramycin when I put in the new bees, that if I have foul brood it doesn't sound like a bad case, and that will cure/prevent it. I have new bees coming the end of April. Six weeks before the spring flow is too cold to even open the hive to inspect, isn't it? I left one full super on all three hives for the winter, but they didn't touch it, as they must have had plenty in the second brood box.

    What to do?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,142

    Default Re: What exactly is considered honey flow and how do you remove Terramycin?

    >The directions say to remove terramycin dust six weeks before honey flow. When exactly would that be??

    I would guess your flow would be about two weeks before mine, which, if you are in the country is probably about the end of May, and if you're in town, is probably about mid May. But I'm not from there, so I can't say for sure.

    > There's already a full super on my hive left from winter. And how can you remove it when it's sprinkled in there?

    You can't.

    Using Terramycin makes them more susceptible to AFB.

    http://www.plosone.org/article/info%...l.pone.0033188

    "...our results strongly suggest that LAB linked to the honeybee crop have important implications for honeybee pathology, particularly for bacterial brood diseases such as AFB and EFB. Honeybees are considered to have only about a third of the innate immune genes compared to other insects [44], [45]. In addition to social defences that accrue to social insects [46], individual honeybees may also benefit from their LAB symbionts, which are probably of great importance in pathogen defence, possibly further reducing dependency on the innate immune system."

    "Any beneficial effect from this microbiota may be undermined where prophylactic use of antibiotics is practiced (e.g. USA) or where their natural foodstuffs, honey and pollen, are supplemented by the beekeeper with synthetic sugars and pollen substitutes lacking LAB or their beneficial substances. The absence of LAB is especially problematic when the bees attempt to produce and preserve food for themselves and their brood, when feeding their brood with pollen lacking LAB or LAB derived antimicrobial substances, when nestmates establish a LAB microbiota in callows by trophallactic exchange, or when pathogens invade their hive. Emphasis now needs to be given to discovering the mechanisms of action of LAB against pathogens and food spoiling microbes, and how they can be used to resolve ongoing honeybee colony losses, in which LAB may be the important missing link. Altered beekeeping husbandry practices that enhance LAB are needed, or direct manipulation by supplementary feeding of individual or composite LAB members and their products could help alleviate CCD. Further functional analysis of LAB in bees will certainly enrich our understanding of insect-microbe symbioses and their evolutionary dynamics within complex eusocial insect societies."
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads