Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 32 of 32
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Dublin, California
    Posts
    197

    Default Re: my version of a Cleo Hogan Trap opinions please.

    The idea is not to catch the queen correct? Do you normally requeen or let the hive requeen itself to keep the new genetics?

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,896

    Default Re: my version of a Cleo Hogan Trap opinions please.

    odfrank...I have about quit trapping,( only have two set for this Spring) ( and I am retiring from selling bees, will likely just keep a dozen or so hives for private honey stock and give aways) but, when I actively trapped bees here are my findings.

    The queen will come into the trap most of the time, to either find the queen that layed the eggs in the trap, or, to use the trap as another chamber to lay eggs. If you are wanting the queen it will require checking the trap every few hours after introduction of the unsealed brood. To answer your question....

    From trees and tanks etc, where the trap transition can be fitted very near the feral brood nest, during a good honey flow with expanding population and queen looking for places to lay eggs, success rate about 80 to 85 percent.

    In walls, buildings etc, more difficult to determine where the brood nest is, and often the trap cannot be placed close enough for the queen to come out to lay or investigate where the brood,(the frame you give them) came from. In these cases, the success rate falls to 35 to 45 percent.

    Without a good honey flow, success rate about 35 to 55 percent. The queen may come to investigate the eggs but, if she doesn't find a queen, or need the room to lay, she may just return to her source and you may miss her.

    I rarely trapped to get the queen. I prefer to take multiple managed starts from the colony and let the trapped bees either make their own queen, or, introduce a mated queen after removing frames from the trap and relocating the new colony. I used the same feral sources for several starts each year. Now days, gasoline is so expensive, and trapping requiring multiple trips to the trap site, that trapping is not as attractive as it once was, unless the trap site is close and handy for you to work.

    Trapping is a lot of fun, and, you learn a lot from it. Sometimes it is necessary when someone wants the bees gone for whatever reason. In that case, try to get the queen, save all the bees, and move from that location.

    cchoganjr

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Dublin, California
    Posts
    197

    Default Re: my version of a Cleo Hogan Trap opinions please.

    Okay that makes sense and I like the idea if letting the colony requeen itself do you keep the genes....

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,896

    Default Re: my version of a Cleo Hogan Trap opinions please.

    Quote Originally Posted by Calbears94 View Post
    I like the idea if letting the colony requeen itself do you keep the genes....
    several variables here. If the trap bees make a queen from the unsealed brood you gave them, then no,. The new queen will be from the queen that layed the eggs that you gave them.

    If the feral queen comes out and lays eggs in the trap, and if the bees build queen cells around those eggs, then yes, the genes would be from the feral queen.

    cchoganjr

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Dublin, California
    Posts
    197

    Default Re: my version of a Cleo Hogan Trap opinions please.

    Very good point so in order to keep the new genes you need the queen to lay eggs or capture her...I appreciate all the advice I think I am going to give it a shot...I will send pics once I get set up and see how it goes...

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    3,064

    Default Re: my version of a Cleo Hogan Trap opinions please.

    I was just looking up some pipe dimensions here.
    http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/pv...ons-d_795.html

    Sch 40 2.5 inch pipe has an OD of 2.875 while the three inch has an ID of 3.068 which is a difference of .193 This will make a slip fit with a gap small enough bees cannot get through it at right around 3/16th of an inch. This combo could be used to make an adjustable slip connection between the flange at the hive entrance and the trap out box.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,316

    Default Re: my version of a Cleo Hogan Trap opinions please.

    3/16" = 0.1875"

    The difference in your pipe diameters is 0.193"

    Bees can squeeze through 1/6" = 1.666"

    3/16" will not stop them. Maybe if you put a couple of wraps of duct tape on the smaller one...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    3,064

    Default Re: my version of a Cleo Hogan Trap opinions please.

    1/6 = 0.166 Just in case anyone tries to use these numbers for anything.
    I ran out of time yesterday while posting this. Tape will work. But also keep in mind the gap is half of the difference. Assuming the pipes are positioned evenly. So a difference of 0.193 when set up correctly would leave a gap of 0.0965. #8 hardware cloth is 0.125. but this requires meticulous placemen of the two pipes which is not likely to happen.

    Better yet is the sch. 80 pipe. 2.5 inch has an OD of 2.875 while the 3 inch has in ID of 2.9 for a difference of 0.025. This creates a gap of 0.0125.

    I have done a lot of work designing things that will slip inside other things. and this is pushing the limit to what I consider a good slip fit. It would require fairly accurate placement of the pipe or they will simply bind. I still consider it the best combination for this application. Schedule 80 pipe may be a little harder to source.

    I have not seen a trap out yet that was placed nice a neat against a flat surface. so their is still the issue of how to box in or enclose the entrance to the hive to then produce a nice flat surface to mount a toilet flange on. I have attempted locations such as the soffit of a roof where the soffit kept the same pitch as the roof. creating basically a triangle shaped space. I have found them int eh corner where a brick chimney met the wall of the house. Also the top of a pillar at the corner so you have both an outside and two inside corners to deal with all at the same time. I have also found them at the trim of a window which is the closest to a flat surface I have seen. They have had their entrance in the valley of a roof. Never have I found the surface at the entrance of a hive to be the same twice. I woudl be interested in hearing ideas on how to transition from this endless geometry to a flat surface where the flange can be mounted.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Bastrop TX USA
    Posts
    220

    Default Re: my version of a Cleo Hogan Trap opinions please.

    "I woudl be interested in hearing ideas on how to transition from this endless geometry to a flat surface where the flange can be mounted."

    This is why I wonder if it would be possible to use a dryer hose or some other flexible hose to connect the two parts of the trap? Lots of duct tape on the part attached to the hive, then just slip the other part on with the hose attached to the trap.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,316

    Default Re: my version of a Cleo Hogan Trap opinions please.

    >But also keep in mind the gap is half of the difference. Assuming the pipes are positioned evenly.

    I guess I would doubt they would stay evenly spaced. More likely they would shift to one side, but then they would probably also shift to somewhat of an angle which might mitigate it anyway.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,896

    Default Re: my version of a Cleo Hogan Trap opinions please.

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Y View Post
    I would be interested in hearing ideas on how to transition from this endless geometry to a flat sur.


    HC Trap 1.jpg


    You can shim it any number of ways, then wrap the transition around a tree/tank etc or wrap plastic using duct tape. Then fit the trap over the transition. 3 mil black plastic works great for this. Not sure if I have photo on this computer, if not, when I return to Kentucky (three weeks, currently in Florida) I will send photo that shows shimming the transition and wrapping with black plastic.

    Sorry my photo wound up in Daniel's quote. (maybe I have moved it out of the quote) I am not the greatest computer driver.

    In my version of the trap I have the two transitions with a very, very, loose fitting which allows for wiggle room to level the trap to the other transition, and to facilitate removing the trap if I remove the trap rather than move frames. If the trap is very full, sometimes it is better to just move the trap and slide a new trap on the transition. If you only have 3 to 5 pounds of bees in the trap, sometimes it is easifer to just move frames. In taking starts I normally move frames. I seal the two transitions in the back with one wrap of duct tape.

    If you have a tree or tank you want to trap, now is the time to put the transition on the tree, seal off all entrances except the transition, let the bees go and come through it for a while, and when the colony has built up nicely, (later in the Spring), add the trap.

    cchoganjr
    Last edited by Cleo C. Hogan Jr; 03-06-2014 at 08:16 AM. Reason: add info move photo

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Bastrop TX USA
    Posts
    220

    Default Re: my version of a Cleo Hogan Trap opinions please.

    I have a Hogan trap on a tree using a small sink plunger. I found it at Lowes for about $3. It is about 12" long with a center accordion section which moves and compresses when using it on a clogged sink. The large end is about 4" in diameter with a rubber flange. I cut the small handle off, leaving an opening of about 1.5".

    I just nailed it to tree through the rubber flange, which conformed somewhat to the shape of the tree. The small end fits nicely through a hole into my 8 frame medium, and, due to the accordion section, flexes enough to make placing the medium quite simple. The taper on the accordion section makes mating with the box easy. The biggest problem is sealing all the other entrances in the tree, which is a problem no matter how you attach the trap to the tree. I finally solved the sealing problem by taking a batt of insulation large enough to cover the entire hole in the tree, cutting a small hole in it and placing it over the plunger. Taped the outside edge of the insulation to the tree, then covered the entire thing with a sheet of black plastic, also with a center hole for the plunger end. It was the only way I could keep the bees from creeping out through the fissures in the bark, since the insulation was pressed into the fissures by the tape.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads