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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wilkesboro, NC
    Posts
    33

    Default New package feeding question

    I got my package and installed it April 19th. (For those of you who know my situation im sorry you have to read this over) Anyway, dead queen with the package, new one on the way, maybe a virgin queen already in there.. My question is should i quit feeding? Ive fed since ive got them and their filling the brood box with honey. Not all the frames but the ones theyve pulled out a little. I want some empty cells for the queen to lay in immedietly because i want them to survive. Im afraid of swarming..? Im in NC. Help!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,195

    Default Re: New package feeding question

    I would keep feeding. Even if there are no eggs/larva without a queen, having them build comb is a good thing. Once they have a viable queen, they will build more comb if necessary to find space for her to lay. Be prepared to add another box if necessary.

    There is no chance of them swarming without a queen.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wilkesboro, NC
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: New package feeding question

    Ok im new...i read as much as i could and still didnt read up enough. sorry for clogging the website with threads by me lol. Their just taking off like crazy. 5 bags of sugar gone already. I just didnt want them to fill the hive body with honey...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wilkesboro, NC
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: New package feeding question

    Should i quit feeding when the queen arrives? ive been told to feed for 2 months but i dont think theyd need that much...?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,195

    Default Re: New package feeding question

    I would expect that as more flowers bloom in your area that the bees consumption of syrup will decrease. That might be about two weeks, I would not expect that you would need to feed for two months more.

    These "local" issues are a good reason to try and find a local beekeeping club to join. Other local beeks will probably have a good idea of local nectar conditions.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    2,597

    Default Re: New package feeding question

    I seriously doubt that they have gotten too much stored in 5 days. Did they start with all foundation? How many frames have drawn comb? How much exactly have they taken - 5 bags doesn't really tell us much...each bag is X lbs?? Provide X. Once you get them queenright, you can rotate a frame at a time of foundation into the center and keep feeding. The bees will very likely do the right thing.

    Also, I don't get your math. Dead queen upon arrival = no eggs = no virgin. Where is the new queen coming from?
    Horseshoe Point Honey -- http://localvahoney.com/

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    966

    Default Re: New package feeding question

    I suspect that once you have a laying queen present, you'll be surprised how quickly stores are consumed.

    I had a 5 frame nuc whose combs were getting pretty full - it was mostly sealed brood.
    I put a nuc box over it containing combs that were half full of honey - bees had starved I the middle of them.
    A week later, there is very little honey up top, and the bottom box is nearly wall to wall brood.

    This week, I moved 2 frames of brood up to the second box, put empty frames on the outside of the brood in the bottom box, (Leaving the frame there had pollen in it).

    I put my remaining comb of stores next to the two brood frames in the second box, with the remainder of box drawn comb (to the outside).

    And, I added a third box of drawn comb.

    We've got the end of willow bloom going right now, with colt's foot, siberian squill, and forsythia in full bloom.
    Dandelion is starting to bloom, and looking at the maples, they'll probably be blooming end of next week.

    Hopefully by then there will be enough drones available to split, as the boxes should be pretty crowded by then

    ...but my point is, once brood production started, the stored honey went pretty quickly.

    Don't worry.
    Everything looks like a crisis your first year.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wilkesboro, NC
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: New package feeding question

    4 4lbs of sugar 1:1 mix. They still have some. The package came with a dead queen, I suspect there's a virgin queen with the normal bees. Thanks for input everyone.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Tuscaloosa, AL
    Posts
    72

    Default Re: New package feeding question

    beekid, there should not be a virgin queen amongst the worker bee (normal bee). If the queen arrived in a cage dead, then there is no possibility that she laid an egg and it went through the cycle of becoming a queen cell into a queen bee. Unless I'm not getting something, I would say your 100% queenless, but that's OK if you have one on the way. Just introduce her into the hive as you would have with your package (in the cage) and you will be on your way.

    Clark
    Last edited by honeyman46408; 04-25-2013 at 09:28 AM. Reason: UNQuote

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wilkesboro, NC
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: New package feeding question

    I ment in the package a Virgin queen with the normal bees. The only bee dead in the queen cage was the queen. I think maybe another queen got mixed up with the normal bees. It's on another thread I started. Sorry if I'm not getting my point across.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    1,677

    Default Re: New package feeding question

    How's your hive doing? Did you get the new queen introduced ok?

    I would keep feeding them until they have the hive built out just like you will over winter them. Keep feeding until they stop taking it or you add your first honey super.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wilkesboro, NC
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: New package feeding question

    The new queen came Friday but it has been rainy all weekend, hopefully installing her tomorrow. The hives still taking sugar like crazy.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    2,597

    Default Re: New package feeding question

    Not knowing the complete story here,this response may be of no value. BTW, give a link to the other thread please. You seem to believe that there is a virgin queen in this package, but now you're going to put a new queen in? Is that correct? If that is the scenario, then this new queen will surely be killed. Given that the package was installed on April 19, and IF there was a virgin queen present, it is very likely that you'll have a laying queen upon next inspection. I would be very certain about the state of this colony before putting in this new queen.
    Horseshoe Point Honey -- http://localvahoney.com/

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