Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: branding iron

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Holtville, California
    Posts
    66

    Default branding iron

    I was looking at branding irons, Mann lake, ever hot, wood craft. My question is on intricate logos will they brand deep enough? what kind is best I figured propane since it is portable. How about old fire ones or buying them locally from a fabricater anyone have luck with that? I just want to know mostly your experiences and if the technology can produce a detailed logo that is about the size of a pog that will burn deep and not be a burnt circle. I figured the logo will be name and other information around the circle and a simple bee or something in the middle like a 50 cent piece. Thank you gentlemen and woman for any information given it s much appreciated taking you time out of your busy bee schedule to help a fellow keeper out. Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
    Posts
    2,674

    Default Re: branding iron

    I got a number style on Ebay for 60.000 numbers and letters work best. designs and such are tough to do thru paint. and week looking painted over.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Weeki Wachee, Florida,USA
    Posts
    1,822

    Default Re: branding iron

    I posted a couple photos of mine on this thread.

    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...Orange+Bloosom


    I'm just starting to get the hang of using it and I don't have the greatest heat source.

    I had to google pog!
    I think depending on the detail of your design and the depth you desire it maybe difficult to find a brand that can deliver a crisp looking brand.

    I settled for a lower cost option.
    I would guess that even with the high end ones the deeper you want your brand to burn the more it will bleed.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Calhoun Co, Texas, USA
    Posts
    1,311

    Default Re: branding iron

    deep brand + detailed + POG sized = burnt blur
    That said, if you went to, say, a 2.5" to 3" circle, and kept the detail *somewhat* restricted, you might be getting into the realm of something feasible. Having played around making fairly simple (so far, 1-line, 3/4" characters has been my best success, sorry, nothing fancy here for ya yet) brands for my own use, I can tell you that burn-bleed is pretty horrendous if you start putting lines within much less than 1/4" of each other (try to write "Help Me" around the outside of a POG without any lines being within 1/4" of each other...you'll have an OK brand then, but pretty much 0 space in the middle for your logo...and 2-3 more letters would hang ya for space), so the moral of the story is: "If you want to go detailed, you HAVE to go bigger unless you just want to make a pretty little woodburner design on the VERY surface."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Forest grove, Ore USA
    Posts
    182

    Default Re: branding iron

    I had two copies of my last name "Stadelman" cut from 1/4 steel one inch high letters for $65.00 by a local waterjet guy. I welded them to a backup piece of steel and then a handle. It is the right height for doing frames and the ends of my boxes. It looks very professional (in my opinion) and since I am waxing my gear really stands out.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Forest grove, Ore USA
    Posts
    182

    Default Re: branding iron

    image.jpgimage.jpgTry photos

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Forest grove, Ore USA
    Posts
    182

    Default Re: branding iron

    I don't know why they got rotated but you get the idea. I am heating the iron over the flam from my wax tank. I will probably build a cheap "forge" to evenly heat the whole branding iron but it works good enough for now.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Pinellass County, Florida
    Posts
    1,066

    Default Re: branding iron

    For what it's worth
    For those who brand there frames
    I brand all mine on one side
    Doing this helps so I know how each frames goes back
    My ID is always to the rear of the hive
    So if I or anyone is going through and twirls the frame (as always) they know which way it goes back

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Dos Palos, Ca. USA
    Posts
    61

    Default Re: branding iron

    I had my brand made by a Company in San Diego, Ca. Brand New is the name I know they make regular bee brands with numbers and letters you might look them up they have web site you might talk with them to see if they could make what you want. Tom

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Perth Western Australia
    Posts
    158

    Default Re: branding iron

    I use a 1/4 inch router with a 45 degree bit to put on my brand (RO1) and the date of assembly eg 4/13; in with boxes the box number ( three digits). Best done before assembly . Takes 20 seconds per frame. ie 10 frames took 200 seconds, I do this freehand . Much quicker than the electric branding iron I hired.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Crenshaw County, Alabama
    Posts
    1,618

    Default Re: branding iron

    3/8" tall, works very well with frames. Once brought up to temperature (I use an old propane space heater) it will brand roughly eight+ frames per heating...1-2 seconds for the first couple of frames and then maybe 4 seconds for the last couple of frames. I've been satisfied with it. I found an online coupon and ended up with less than $55 invested...should last a lifetime.

    http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...6&site=ROCKLER


    Rockler also offers a few other styles. Beware that the electric-heating irons are slow to heat and reheat...
    http://woodworking.rockler.com/c/branding-irons

    Best wishes,
    Ed

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,459

    Default Re: branding iron

    Having made two pneumatic machines to brand wooden gift box parts, with heads from Everhot(now BrandNew), I would suggest a slightly lower temperature and higher pressure for the best image. As for speed, 1000 pieces an hour should be quite doable with simple automation. Be aware that after several years of seasonal 40hr week use, the image quality will degrade.

    Crazy Roland

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads