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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amador County, California, USA
    Posts
    138

    Default Are Mann Lake plastic frames any good?

    I was speaking with another beekeeper and he told me that his bees wouldn't build wax correctly (or at all on some).

    Do any of you use yellow plastic frames from Mann lake? If so, do they build wax correctly on them?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Casey, Il, USA
    Posts
    1,006

    Default Re: Are Mann Lake plastic frames any good?

    I don't know where the frames came from, but my nuc came with yellow plastic frames, and they seemed drawn out just fine.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Grand Junction, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    231

    Default Re: Are Mann Lake plastic frames any good?

    Mine are covered in comb as well with no problems concerning coverage. You can see some Mannlake frames on my facebook link completely full of honey.
    Jack Moore ~ Sticky Bear Apiary
    Zone 7a ~ Elev: 4840ft. ~ https://www.facebook.com/StickyBearApiary

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Strasburg, Pa, USA
    Posts
    116

    Default Re: Are Mann Lake plastic frames any good?

    Mine built well last year, I coated with extra bee's wax. I bought more for this season.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Campbell River, BC, CA
    Posts
    516

    Default Re: Are Mann Lake plastic frames any good?

    6 hives all double deeps. All built on the yellow plastic frames. A super of mediums on most. None of them built much comb till the nectar was flowing, then they built like gangbusters. I put a green drone frame in a couple weeks ago, and one hive had it fully built in a week.

    Bottom line you need a flow to get comb built, and with a good flow on, it doesn't matter what the frames are.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ojai, California
    Posts
    928

    Default Re: Are Mann Lake plastic frames any good?

    A lot of the commercial guys are using the wax-coated, plastic foundation in the wooden frames citing "the best of all worlds". The wax moth can't get from one side to the other, limiting damage; the wood frames are stronger, more durable, and less prone to warp in the heat than plastic frames; the bees take to them very well; they get drawn straight; they don't sag like wax & wire; they don't get chewed out too badly.

    You're up in Amador County, probably don't have to worry about the heat as bad as I used to in Mojave, so you'll likely get away with the plastic frames just fine.

    I do recommend their 2-gallon frame feeders, and the green frames are not a bad idea. Good luck!

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