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Thread: advertising?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Alabama
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    Default advertising?

    i am putting up an ad for swarm removal any tips on how to word the ad and what to ask the person with the swarm?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Troy, IL
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    138

    Default Re: advertising?

    I always ask a few questions so I know what I am up against before I respond to any swarm call:

    1. How long has the swarm been at the location?
    2. Where exactly is the swarm located on the property?
    3. How large is the swarm?
    4. How high off the ground is it?
    5. Has the swarm been sprayed with pesticides, or anything else, such as water?
    6. Will someone be at the property to direct me to the bees, or grant me permission to enter the property.

    I find by asking a few questions, it will save me time and energy on swarm calls. So far, by getting some information before I respond, I find myself prepared for what I find when I arrive. Most people are very forthcoming with information.........all you need to do is be polite, and ask the right questions! Everyone I have dealt with on swarm calls have been fascinated by the removal process, and many of these folks have become honey customers too.
    Please visit our Beekeeping Blog
    http://akhoneybees.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Washington County, Maine
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    2,859

    Default Re: advertising?

    A big question up this way is if they are honey bees or not. You don't want to waste your time going after yellow jackets.
    Master Beekeeper (EAS) and Master Gardener (U Maine CE) www.beeberrywoods.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Alabama
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    Default Re: advertising?

    okay any more tips and can i use buckets to catch swarms?

  5. #5
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    Aug 2005
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    Default Re: advertising?

    Seldom do I see a swarm at ground level that I could use a regular bucket with. I do use a five gallon bucket from Home Depot duct taped to the telescoping pole from a pruning saw. That and a step ladder are my primary swarm catching tools. Other items would include: a card board box (with lid) to put the bees in for transport, a hand saw for trimming limbs and the usual veil, gloves and smoker which may or may not get used depending on the circumstances.
    Master Beekeeper (EAS) and Master Gardener (U Maine CE) www.beeberrywoods.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Crenshaw County, Alabama
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    2,000

    Default Re: advertising?

    I've found I like something larger than a bucket in cases where I can't shake straight downward into the bucket...a square box seems to work better in those situations. But, buckets work fine if you can get the bucket close to and directly beneath the swarm and shake the swarm straight down into it. In some instances height will make buckets very useful. Hive boxes are good, too. I've hived several swarms by just putting a few handfuls of bees into the box and let the cluster then march inside. Using a bucket, plastic storage container, cardboard box, etc., can all be enhanced by added a piece of old comb. Lot's of variables, but bottom line is something that the bees will fit into, that can be fairly easily sealed so as to contain them for the ride "home", that allows ventilation, and that the bees can be removed from fairly easily will work. If I had my druthers it would be into a hive box with at least a few frames of drawn comb inside.

    Ed

  7. #7
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    Jul 2011
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    Crenshaw County, Alabama
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    Default Re: advertising?

    Andrew, good catch on the saw for pruning limbs back. I like to use clippers or lopping shears unless the limbs are over inch thick...less vibration...but if the bees are gentle a saw works fine (see image below). What circumstances do you run into where you use smoke on swarms?

    Ed


  8. #8
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    Aug 2005
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    Default Re: advertising?

    I can't recall a time when I have used smoke on a swarm, but I'm certain if I didn't have the smoker with me I'd need it.
    Master Beekeeper (EAS) and Master Gardener (U Maine CE) www.beeberrywoods.com

  9. #9
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    Default Re: advertising?

    I understand. I have yet to run into an ornery swarm but figure one day I will. From my little bit of newbee experience it seems that the longer a swarm has been hanging clustered that a greater number of bees fly when the swarm is shook. A swarm that is just an hour or three old seems to simply drop into the box without a lot of flying...and if there is flying the flying bees are in very close proximity to where the cluster fell.

    Ed

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
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    Default Re: advertising?

    I have used smoke many times. No so much because the bees were grumpy. Mostly just to get them to move. After most of the bees are in the box and fanning, at that point I'm pretty sure I have the queen in the box. There will still be bees going to where the swarm was at by giving these bees a puff of smoke it gets them to flying again once they are in the air again they seem to find the box faster than just waiting. That's about the only thing I use a smoker for on swarm calls.

  11. #11
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    Jul 2011
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    Default Re: advertising?

    johng, I understand what you're saying about getting the bees moving and in the air. I got a swarm off of a 3-year old collard plant the other day and as the straggler bees tried to re-cluster on the plant I'd simply shake the plant every few minutes...kept them flying pretty good. Where a swarm has clustered on a non-movable object I can see where the smoker could be useful.

    Ed

  12. #12
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    Apr 2013
    Location
    Alabama
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    Default Re: advertising?

    i am down south and ahb are down here so if i come across a ahb swarm will they bee just as docile as ehb swarm?

  13. #13
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    Nov 2009
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    Default Re: advertising?

    I don't think you will have any problems with AHB in AL. But, to answer your question no you can't tell. They will be just as gentle and regular honey bees. It not until they get their hive set up and have some brood and honey to protect that the defensive nature will come out.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Default Re: advertising?

    Ditto what johng said.

    Where are you located, guy? There was an AHB colony caught down in Mobile some years ago...it was believed to have come in on a freighter that brought cargo into the port. Alabama has a string of bait hives along the Florida/Alabama stateline and along the southern part of the Georgia/Alabama line. It seems that at the Honey Bee Symposium in Auburn this past February that the bait-line was briefly mentioned and then passed on over... I just sent an email to a bee inspector to see if they've caught any African genetics in any of the traps...I'll post back what I hear.

    Also, there were some African genetics found in Tennessee last year (I believe it was last year). Supposedly these were from some package bees from elsewhere.

    Ed

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