Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: New install

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    137

    Default New install

    Watching package installs on youtube.. My first bees expected to ship the 23rd, i want to be as prepared as possible.. Most videos say set package in front of the hive after you shake em in so the remaining bees can enter the hive. A couple of people said to plug your entrance so no bees can get out for the first 24 hours.. Another guy said its bad to shake the bees into the hive because it angers them and they will kill the queen because of it.. Any recommendations for a new beek??

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Quincy, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    278

    Default Re: New install

    .. Another guy said its bad to shake the bees into the hive because it angers them and they will kill the queen because of it..

    I searched a lot of YouTube myself and never heard that one.
    New BK here too. We did our install on the 6th of this month. I watched a vid by "FruitGuys" and mirrored their install. Very gentle, used sugar spray, pulled frames from the box to make room for the package. Installed the queen cage in-between frames and held it with a rubber band. I put a little loose plug of grass in the entrance, that if they wanted it out, it could be done. 24 hours later when checked, the package was empty (except for a few dead), queen was out (we had replaced the cork with a chunk of marshmallow). I put the frames back into the box. All went smoothly. We didn't check them again for 72 hours. At that time both queens (we did two colonies) were spotted, so all was good. I recall the majority of vids I watched leaned the package against the hive or nearby so the bees could make their way into the hive. We just chose to put the package into the hive as it looked like an easy introduction into their new home. But I don't know much as we're still learning. Just passing along what our experience was.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JVaYD3e9KOA

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Marysville, WA
    Posts
    477

    Default Re: New install

    Beekeepers have been shaking the bees from packages into hives for a very long time. Your queen should be left in the queen cage for a few days until they release her therefore you don't have to worry about them killing her. You don't want to plug the entrance either. There will be some bees that won't make it into the hive during the install and you want them to be able to get inside. The bees upon being shaken into the hive will immediatly start fanning at the entrance to "announce" the scent. Any bees outside the hive will follow the scent to the new home.
    Everything on the internet is not true. You would be better off following the guidelines of a good book or better yet an experienced local beekeeper. Package installs are fun. Good luck.

    Mike
    Beekeeper? Shoot, my bees keep me!
    100 hives in Western Wa State

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    4,001

    Default Re: New install

    Set up your new hive and remove four frames from the middle.
    Pry off wooden slat on top of box covering feeder can.
    You will see a strap of some kind holding queen cage suspended by feeder can.
    Pry out the can and hold on to strap or metal tab holding queen cage.
    Set queen cage on landing board of hive.
    Hold package with one hand and hit it sharply with the palm of your other hand.
    Turn package upside down and shake and rattle bees out into space where frames removed.
    Slowly replace frames allowing bees to flow under other frames and out of the way.
    Expose candy on queen cage by peeling off tape. I like to make a hole in the middle with a moist toothpick.
    Friction fit queen cage between two middle frames with cage screen facing down and the candy not covered so bees can release queen.
    So easy I have sucessfully done it hundreds of times.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Gordonsville,VA USA
    Posts
    114

    Default Re: New install

    And there you have the rest of the story

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    137

    Default Re: New install

    Queen facedown important??

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
    Posts
    2,644

    Default Re: New install

    If your new at it I would suggest you DON"T shake them... (you can no problem) Take out 4 frames on the opisite side of where you put the queen and set the box in that hole. give the bees 3-4 hours to walk out and into the hive on their own. then take the box out and replace teh frames. any missed bees, just set the package on the ground in front of the hive.

    nothing against shakeing, but for a new person its quite intimidating and not neccassary. its faster than 2 trips to the yard for many of us.... but not the only trick in the book.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    137

    Default Re: New install

    Actually i am nervous, yet excited... Im looking very forward to the entire experience and i think a shake down will be a good first step for me personally.. Face your fears head on as they say. Its strange. A year ago at this time i would have avoided bees at all cost. Now after hours and hours of research and reading and youtube and scouring forums its a different story all together. Turns out behind our old barn we have a bee tree. A year ago we would have wanted them gone. Now its good news. In fact last weekend i chainsawed a section away to see how big it was (replaced the chunk after the investigation to keep it closed for them) ... I made a deal with the little women who is as excited as i am. If i shake the package of bees, she will pull the frames for our first inspection. Who knew we would get this excited over bees

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    St. Louis, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    626

    Default Re: New install

    I did my two installations last year and my one this year similar to how Vance describes. It worked great. I was definitely nervous and excited. The second one the bees were pretty feisty. The holes in the syrup can were tiny so I think they were starving and therefore cranky. One stung my glove. I definitely recommend suiting-up. I also recommend closing off your pants at the ankles. The bees in that second package were crawlers, I had to be careful they didn't climb up my pants legs. The other two didn't do that, but my point is that bees are unpredictable and you should be as prepared for that as possible.

    Careful watching the YouTube install videos, I watched one last year where the guy installed them in shorts and no gear other than a veil. I think he took ten stings to his hands and his buddy/videographer abandoned him for the safety of the truck.

    Hope your install goes well! Enjoy the bees!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Tuscaloosa, AL
    Posts
    72

    Default Re: New install

    Stanger, facing the queen down allows the bees to cluster at the top and keep her warm, if the cage us upwards you may not get enough bees on top of the frames and between the inner cover to do the job.
    Quote Originally Posted by Stanger View Post
    Queen facedown important??

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Shickshinny, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    858

    Default Re: New install

    Most installs show the queen cage laying flat on the frame with the screen up against another frame , how can the bees get to the screen to feed her this way , it would seem better to put the cage so the screen is more accessible.

    Maybe I didn't understand Vance's method- if its now what I'm thinking I like it . The cage is placed horizontal between the frames with the narrow edges of the cage touching the frames , screen facing down and candy end pointing out towards side of super.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads