Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    131

    Default Queens Hatched, When to inspect for eggs

    I split my two hives two weeks ago and used the resources from the two original to make 5 splits. After inspecting on Friday, I saw some hatched queen cells and found some queens prowling around. I have put in the info into the Beeyard Queen Bee Calendar, but it seems a bit far off to wait another two weeks before these girls are expected to start laying.

    Does it really take her around a week to mate, and another to start laying?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Bloomington, IN, USA
    Posts
    307

    Default Re: Queens Hatched, When to inspect for eggs

    You can check Michael Bush's Bee Math: http://www.bushfarms.com/beesqueenrearing.htm
    From queen emerges at 16 days +/- 1 day, and is laying at 28 days +/- 5 days.
    So from emerging to laying takes 12 days +/- 5 days
    Good luck!
    DsBs.Etsy.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,660

    Default Re: Queens Hatched, When to inspect for eggs

    After the queen hatched she need one week to harden and develop herself
    for the mating flight. Another week for the flight if you have good flying drones then only one or 2 flight will do.
    Then another 3-5 days for her to lay the eggs. In total might take up to 12 days or so if everything is on schedule.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    131

    Default Re: Queens Hatched, When to inspect for eggs

    Alright will give it wait then. In the mean time let them sit, and fully utilize the 3 frames? or stick them in 5 frame nucs?

    How long till they can fill up another 2 frames with only foundation?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,660

    Default Re: Queens Hatched, When to inspect for eggs

    If you feel they are comfortable in the 5 frame nucs then let them bee.
    Does not matter as long as they are able to keep the hive space warm.
    After queen start laying they should draw the other 2 frames out. Try to maintain
    the bee population up for a month or two for a successful split. It is not that easy
    to do though.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    131

    Default Re: Queens Hatched, When to inspect for eggs

    They are in a 3 frame queen castle right now. I heard that a cup full of bees was enough to get it going. It's getting close to 90 here during the day, so warmth is not an issue in South Florida. Should I move them to 5 frame nuc once I know the queen is laying?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,660

    Default Re: Queens Hatched, When to inspect for eggs

    I am not sure if one cup will do or not. I know one frame of bees will do as I never use the cup to measure bees before.
    As long as they are able to cover the frames and broods they should be fine. Right now the quantity of bees will determine
    if this is a good split. The old bees will be dying in a month or so in the summer time when they are foraging. When the 3
    frames almost got covered with bees then move them to the 5 frame nucs. I do expansion at the 80% hive space level.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Default Re: Queens Hatched, When to inspect for eggs

    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesmath.htm

    Two weeks after she emerges is when I first look for eggs. Three weeks is when I give up and kill her because she will be a drone layer.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ojai, California
    Posts
    932

    Default Re: Queens Hatched, When to inspect for eggs

    Backyard - you are situated somewhat more Southerly than Mr. Bush, and may find that they can mate in as little as 7 days after emergence. They don't necessarily, but it seems to happen more often in warmer weather. I'm in SoCal, and run a 40-day cycle for open-mating, 37 days for I.I.

    When I was first trying queen rearing, I waited an additional 5 days to look for larvae instead of eggs, as they were much easier to see.

    Michael B - I love your bee math article! With your permission, I will print it and laminate it and hang it in the queen room.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Default Re: Queens Hatched, When to inspect for eggs

    > With your permission, I will print it and laminate it and hang it in the queen room.

    You have my permission.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ojai, California
    Posts
    932

    Default Re: Queens Hatched, When to inspect for eggs

    Big Thank You, Michael.

    BackYard - The drink cup they speak of using to measure bees into your mini mating nucs is a 32-ounce cup. I prefer at least half again that amount, but I no longer use minis as the bees do tend to swarm off from them. Hive dividers set so you can divide a 10-frame medium into 3 three-frame mating nucs works great, and handles about 3 1/2 such cups of bees in each division. Some might argue that this is a big waste of bee resources, but the nucs stay home (they don't swarm) and they get busy raising brood and they go into 2 x 5-frame arrangement after 1 month, and on to a full box two weeks after that when the nectar / pollen flow is good. I prefer this setup as increaser colonies get started a good 3 to 5 weeks earlier than mini mating boxes, depending on the nectar / pollen situation.

    The bottom board must have slots for the dividers as well, entries facing different directions, and I make 3 narrow inner covers for 3 x 3-frame mating nuc arrangement. A standard telescoping cover goes on top. It is some woodwork, but it is a queen rearing dream. I also make bottoms and half-inner covers for 2 x 5-frame double nuc arrangement. I really love this setup. I will soon phase out all boxes that are not mediums, so any frame, any box, any arrangement.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads