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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Pembina, ND USA
    Posts
    33

    Default feeder in foundationless

    I am using foundationless frames in medium super Lang hive and installing new packages. I am still freaking out over direct releasing (*G*), but my question lay in how to feed them. I had been thinking eke with baggies or newspaper and sugar on the frames, or top feeder of some type and people are mentioning NOT allowing bees any extra space/areas to build which might happen with both sugar and baggie feeding if I use the spacer.
    So, if I was to use paint cans with syrup inverted over the inner cover, what do I do as far as covering the inner cover with a super? My medium supers are not tall enough to cover a paint can, so do I need to buy extra supers and then put two on top, then the telescoping lid on top of that and a brick to hold it down? Do you have deep supers for this purpose alone?
    I have seen pictures of people just putting can on top and not having any other lid (so exposed feeders) but I do wonder if our strong winds would blow the top or the jars right off and then leave an open hole exposed or if this is not a concern.

    Do I need a screened ventilation hole in the cover since I am covering up the inner cover vent hole with the paint can?

    For those of you with top entrances, do you feed from below?

    Thanks so much

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Pembina, ND USA
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: feeder in foundationless

    Oh, and to those feeding pollen, how do you do this in a new package without having extra space that can mess up the comb building?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    watertown,wi.,USA
    Posts
    476

    Default Re: feeder in foundationless

    I use extra shallows or 1 deep to protect the bucket. It also keeps other bees away from robbing. My inner cover had a notch in it for ventilation and as an entrance. So....for me it goes top box, inner cover, bucket feeder, "dummy box", and then telescoping cover. To save a bit of money, I also have made a 4-5 inch frame out of wood to elevate the super so it clears the height of the bucket, then I placed the telescoping on that. 1 deep should be tall enough to cover a 1 gallon bucket though, otherwise you will need 2 mediums.

    Something new that I learned will be using pollen patties is to place the pollen patty in the back cover of the hive, not in the center. Otherwise, you will be blocking the access the bees will want in order to access the bucket feeder. juzzer

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Arlee MT USA
    Posts
    548

    Default Re: feeder in foundationless

    I've never had to leave a spacer on for so long that they started building in it. I don't think it's a problem.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Cookeville, TN, USA
    Posts
    4,111

    Default Re: feeder in foundationless

    Your medium supers will cover a quart jar. Most quart jars anyway - a few are taller. And you can mash a pollen patty down thin enough to go between the top bars and inner cover. Jars are actually a good way to go for a new hive because you can tell just by looking if it needs refilling.
    Since '09-25H-T-Z6b

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,336

    Default Re: feeder in foundationless

    This feeder is pretty much free:
    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfeeding.htm#bottom
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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