Results 1 to 15 of 15

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Randolph, NC, USA
    Posts
    92

    Default Alternative Subspecies in North Carolina (other than Italian)

    Hi all! I'm looking to find up to 4 packaged or nucs, or even just queens other than Italians in north carolina. I'd rather not have to ship these, and I'm willing to drive an hour or two (or more if I can figure out the logistics of keeping them alive and minimal stress during transit) to get them. I would rather not ship, but if I have to....

    I'm particularly interested in Buckfast, but all american or carnies seem like good options as well, in that order.


    Anyway, If anyone can help me out, I would greatly appreciate it!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,567

    Default Re: Alternative Subspecies in North Carolina (other than Italian)

    Russian queens and nucs in Marion NC:
    http://www.revisrussians.com/Products.html
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Randolph, NC, USA
    Posts
    92

    Default Re: Alternative Subspecies in North Carolina (other than Italian)

    Thanks! Im worried about Russians swarming alot, or being agressive. I know buckfast can be agressive, but mainly if from the south. Do you have any experience with russians? My local "mentor" if you will says he hates them.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,567

    Default Re: Alternative Subspecies in North Carolina (other than Italian)

    I have no experience with Russian bees. I have italians from Arnold in Knoxville, plus a feral(?) (mutt?) swarm that moved into one of my swarm traps last spring. (Hoping for more swarms this year!)

    At one time I considered buying Russians from Long Creek in Parrottsville TN , only a few miles down the road (now out of business). In the course of researching the business reputation of Long Creek, I came across Beesource. Fortunately, I never sent money to Long Creek.

    My suggestion is to get whatever bees you can. Later, If you decide you really want a particular flavor, you can just requeen the hive with your specific flavor. You will find it easier to find specific queen vendors by ordering earlier in the season, and shipping queens is easier and more practical than shipping nucs.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: Alternative Subspecies in North Carolina (other than Italian)

    I don't know his current availability, but Larry Tate in Winston-Salem has carnies and local survivor mutts.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    goldsboro nc USA
    Posts
    98

    Default Re: Alternative Subspecies in North Carolina (other than Italian)

    Just curious but why don't you want italians?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Randolph, NC, USA
    Posts
    92

    Default Re: Alternative Subspecies in North Carolina (other than Italian)

    Thanks for the replies everyone, sorry I've been so slow to respond, it's spring and that means I'm busy on the farm!


    As for why, well, in all honesty, it boils down to my very amateur idea that something is up with the Italians. I suspect this may in part be due to some sort of loss of genetic vigor, from over breeding. or, perhaps major suppliers of Italians are doing something wrong. Ive read alot of different stories, and the math says (most likely due to shear numbers of people raising italians, rather than any sort of issue, a probability thing) italians are doing worse than some other species in various aspects.

    So, in part, I would like to find another subspecies that does well in my area. Later, down the road, I could possibly breed in positive traits from subspecies-"x" with italians.

    Secondly, it seems, at least in my area, that there are hardly any other subspecies available. If I were to sell nucs and packages (part of my 5 year biz plan) I could fill a niche market with specialty subspecies.

    I also like the idea of experiencing different behavior patterns and the like. For instance, if memory serves me correctly after a long hard day, Carnies tend to make propolis (or was it wax?, seriously long day!) in abundance. It would be fun to play around with that, particularly propolise, from a financial standpoint as well as genetic (resistance to XXX) study. I.E. Is coating their hives with so much wax or propolis helping them fight off pests? or helping overwinter by sealing off cracks and such for temperature regulation etc..etc...

    Again, I'm new to apiculture, these are just my newbeek thoughts that go through my head.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads