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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Tuckasegee, NC
    Posts
    59

    Default Second graft in finisher

    I have a frame of 15 cells going in a strong finisher. Can I graft another frame and send it through the starter then move it to the finisher while the first batch is uncapped? If so where do I put it next to the others of a frame away?
    Thanks Devlin
    Devlin Wilde
    Zone 7a 2600 ft in WNC

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,983

    Default Re: Second graft in finisher

    Yes, this will work if you have a good starter as well. Success is not always a guarantee anyways. Just make sure the finisher on first frame do not have early emerging ones otherwise both frames will be history. You do know that early emerge one will kill off the others, right. You can use cages to prevent that though. Good luck!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Tuckasegee, NC
    Posts
    59

    Default Re: Second graft in finisher

    I will be moving the first graft to mating nucs before they emerge, I really just wanted to get a second batch going, I am grafting for a friend to replace her winter losses and she will need about 20 queens so i want to produce 35-40 cells. I do this outside and find that if I do about 20 at a time I have more get stated. I am not sure why, even though i cover them with a moist towel i suspect the frist bar gets dried out because the second bar grafted always seems to do a little better. Have you done the above yourself? Thanks.
    Devlin Wilde
    Zone 7a 2600 ft in WNC

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,983

    Default Re: Second graft in finisher

    No, I have not done my graft using your method. I have a small operation so do not need that many queens. I'd only done the OTS to get a few big fat juicy queens from. They all got mated and laying now. All in solid pattern. Though many are more of a common sense to do this. Maybe you can get some Royal jelly to prime the cells first. The acceptance rate is better I think since the bees would think these cells are already been worked on by other bees. And will continue to work on them. I am also thinking to put the bar with the towel after you done a graft into a lunch igloo box. Or any small cooler you have. This way the moisture can be maintain that they don't get dry out too fast.
    In chapter 9 the cell finishers have bees flowing to the outside. http://archive.org/stream/queenreari...ge/20/mode/2up This is very strong finisher colony to feed the queen cells. Also, the night before the grafting put the bar with cups inside the cell starter colony to get used to the smell from the bees too. This will also increase the chance of cell acceptance when you do the graft the next day. Some will do a graft inside their car to avoid the windy conditions as well. So not to dry the cells out that fast.

    Few good big fat juicy early spring queens:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Tuckasegee, NC
    Posts
    59

    Default Re: Second graft in finisher

    Hey, those look nice and thanks for the advice and reply. I will try to cooler idea and see how it works it is a logical idea. I will also let you know how the second graft in the finsher works. I am going to wait until this first batch is capped to place the second in mostly because it is more convenient for me.
    I too do not need that many queens but this is a lot of fun so my plan is to help out my friend and then keep 5 to 6 mating nucs for people I know in need of a queen through out the season and then try to over winter a few nucs at the end of summer.
    Devlin Wilde
    Zone 7a 2600 ft in WNC

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    6,076

    Default Re: Second graft in finisher

    For many (but not all) queen raising systems it can be standard procedure to place more cells in the finisher before the previous ones are removed. Me though, I like the first ones to be capped before more are put in.

    There are so many variables though that a 100% always right answer to this question is not possible. During swarming season, with a very strong, well fed hive, you can do what you want and more, and get good cells. At a different time of year or with a hive that is not pumping, you will not get such good results.
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

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