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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Kaysville, Utah, USA
    Posts
    363

    Question Full super, no extractor. What to do?

    I went to the hive this afternoon to do a quick inspection to see if they were ready to split. I found them in the middle of a huge orientation flight, so rather than break the hive apart as planned, I just popped the cover and looked at the super. It's completely capped!

    Of course, I don't have an extractor. Is it OK to leave the super on for the next 5 1/2 months? If my bees keep this up, I'm going to need an extractor or a lot more supers!
    Don't provoke a hive full of angry bees.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Westchester NY
    Posts
    231

    Default Re: Full super, no extractor. What to do?

    You can...but in that amount of time especially in a nectar dearth the bees can uncap and eat/move most of that honey, so I would pay attention to the nectar flows in your area or ask a local beekeeper who knows the timing of the flow
    http://www.peekskillnurseries.com
    Specialists in Ground Cover plants since 1937

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
    Posts
    2,674

    Default Re: Full super, no extractor. What to do?

    x is right, they will stop and steal your honey in a dearth.... You also need to have space for them to expand. without that they will difinatly go into swarm mode. Get another super and put it under your full one... or crush and strain a cpl frames.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Kaysville, Utah, USA
    Posts
    363

    Default Re: Full super, no extractor. What to do?

    Thank you. I've got 4 other supers ready to put on, so I think I'll do that.

    Slightly false alarm. Things calmed down at the hive so I opened it up for a little bit. The super is mostly capped (to paraphrase Miracle Max) -- a few frames are only half capped. The ones I didn't pull out, as it happens. I noticed a few drone cells along the bottom of a couple of the frames. Either the queen laid the eggs before I got the excluder on, or she's got a long reach.

    I pulled the frames from the upper deep, and that hive is definitely ready to split. There wasn't enough light to see eggs and whatnot, so I decided not to open the bottom deep. Provided her highness is still around (my #1 paranoid fear is smashing her), things are looking good!
    Don't provoke a hive full of angry bees.

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