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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Hot Springs, Arkansas
    Posts
    259

    Default split? swarm cells question/is a small capped queen cell bad?

    I checked my hives and no swarm cells. I took some frames out of a few hives to make a nuc about a week ago. A professional beekeeper told me yesterday to really keep a close eye because they are swarming like crazy so I rechecked and one hive had about 8 big nice queen cells capped. I check my nuc that I made also and it had a capped queen cell but it is really kinda small. Should I replace it with the big nice one that I have or just let it go?

    I really think it is too small to be a healthy queen, so I thought I would ask here.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,441

    Default Re: split? swarm cells question/is a small capped queen cell bad?

    Honestly, I think people get too caught up with size of the cell and not the actual size of the queen. If you can cut a bigger cell out easy enough, I'd probably do it though, that looks more like a last resort emergency cell.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Pinellass County, Florida
    Posts
    1,077

    Default Re: split? swarm cells question/is a small capped queen cell bad?

    You can do either
    But having only one cell really isn't the best thing
    So many things can get to that queen and she won't
    Make it
    Can you take a couple from the other hive
    If so I would do that
    Good luck in your venture

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Knox, Pa. USA
    Posts
    910

    Default Re: split? swarm cells question/is a small capped queen cell bad?

    Although I feel it is better to have a few queen cells in a newly producing colony. The size really does not make a super big difference. Because unless you have multiple queens hatch out at the same time survival of the fittest does not come into play. The first hatching queen will kill the other queens defenseless in their cells.
    I would not let the cell size determine the viability of a queen. I have seen small queens become huge after breeding and beginning to produce eggs. remember the thorax, and head of all queens are relatively the same size, only the abdomen seems to get larger. So trying to determine a queens production by the size of her cell would be like trying to determine a mans fertility by the size of his penis.

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