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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    3,451

    Default What should I cut off my fingers with . . .

    or, stated more optimistically, what features should I look for in a used table saw for making boxes for Lang. hives and/or topbar hives?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Midland, MI
    Posts
    577

    Default Re: What should I cut off my fingers with . . .

    assuming you want to have box joints, make sure the arbor length is such that the saw will accept dado blades.

    Aside from that, get somethign that will suit your space constraints and budget. When making boxes, you're cutting wood that is 3/4" thick. any table saw can handle that. Even when i am making my frames, it's only ripping down 2X4s, which are only 1-3/4" thick. That can bog down some saws, but with a decent blade, any of them will do.

    now, for nice features...well there you just look for what you want to have.

    I made all of my gear on an old makita with an archaic rip fence that could easily be set with 1/4" of runout across the table. I would juset set it straight-ish and clamp it down. we're talking about bee boxes here, not cherry cabinets, or teak hand rails.

    if you're looking for new, the DeWalt 744X, the Bosch 4100, and the Ridgid 4510 would be high on my list.

    If you're not in a big yank to get one, check out garage sales and craigslist. folks don't use table saws much and they often sell them pretty cheap. 3 days ago i bought a BT3000 at a garage sale for $25. I did have to pull the motor, clean it, and install new brushes, but that's only about 30 minutes of time and maybe $10 if you didn't have the brushes already. Deals are out there

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,074

    Default Re: What should I cut off my fingers with . . .

    Ideally, you want to be able to get at least full 3/4" thickness of dados stacked on the blade arbor (shaft). So the part of that arbor that seats the blade needs to be at least 3/4" long PLUS the thickness of the nut that secures the blade.

    Beyond that I'd look for a capacitor start motor. A saw that has a universal motor is less likely to have a motor suitable to handle a full set of dados. Typically, a belt driven motor with one or two "lumps" on the motor housing is what an capacitor start motor will look like. But depending on the space you have available to store the saw, you may have to settle for something less capable.
    Last edited by Rader Sidetrack; 04-05-2013 at 08:07 PM. Reason: spelling
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,690

    Default Re: What should I cut off my fingers with . . .

    Besides the items mentioned above, check the horsepower, and weather the motor is integral or not. I prefer old motors that are more robust/rugged than the newer over-rated ones. We have a Delta, made in Milwaukee just after WWII, with a 3/4 hp capacitor start motor.

    Crazy Roland

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,074

    Default Re: What should I cut off my fingers with . . .

    Depending on your price range, this might be a decent buy:
    http://tulsa.craigslist.org/tls/3711179103.html
    Its a Chinese saw, but it appears to have a USA Emerson capacitor start motor. I am guessing it was made/imported by Grizzly Industrial: http://www.grizzly.com/
    Call Grizzly and ask if they stock parts for a G6025 saw. If they do, consider buying the saw.

    This ad: http://tulsa.craigslist.org/fuo/3681658286.html
    has multiple tools, but the $80 Craftsman tablesaw looks like an excellent buy if you can work around the missing knobs.

    I have a Craftsman with a broken plastic knob for adjusting blade tilt. With the broken knob removed, a standard 11/16" socket fits the shaft. I chuck a socket driver in a cordless drill and use that to adjust the tilt. Its actually faster than the hand crank and works better anyway.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Palermo, Maine, USA
    Posts
    731

    Default Re: What should I cut off my fingers with . . .

    All the above replys are excellent. Most any saw will do the job. Arbor length for dados would be very important for box or rabbit joints.

    Things I prefer are a cast iron top, table extentions on the sides, a good quality fence.
    Like us on facebook This is the place to bee!
    Ralph

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    East Peoria, IL
    Posts
    398

    Default Re: What should I cut off my fingers with . . .

    I picked up a used JET contractor saw for $100, needed a belt, blade, and throat plate.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    3,451

    Default Re: What should I cut off my fingers with . . .

    Thanks so much for the replies (and feel free to add more). Rader, or anybody else who may know, would the two saws shown in the craigslist ad accept a dado blade? I actually think I already have a dado blade for a table saw, but I'm not sure if it's the right size. The house I live in has a little shop and the people who sold me the house also sold the shop equipment. I have a radial arm and band saw but not a table saw.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,074

    Default Re: What should I cut off my fingers with . . .

    "Stack" dado blades have multiple blades in the stack, and you install however many it takes to get the thickness of the cut you want. So virtually any saw will accept some amount of dado blades. But if you want to make the best uses of the dado set, make sure you can install 3/4". You probably will need to verify that by looking at the saw.

    Many Craftsman and Grizzly models will handle a 3/4" dado stack, but who is to say whether they all do?

    If you already have a "wobble" style dado blade, measure to see how much arbor length it requires. If you don't already own a wobble blade, I can't recommend buying one. Get a real stack set instead.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,622

    Default Re: What should I cut off my fingers with . . .

    Whatever you get, spend some time aligning it (blade, slots, fence). $20 gets you a set of PAL'S that allow you to align the blade to the slots better accurately.
    Either come up with a procedure for lining up the fence (as detailed above) or buy a good fence.
    These are safety issues.....if the wood binds between the blade and the fence or the mitre, that is when you will get kickback.
    Don't ask me about fences....I just installed a good one, but it wasn't cheap.

    Deknow
    The irony is free. It's the sarcasm you are paying for....ironically.
    -Felicity Jones in "Chalet Girl"

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    3,451

    Default Re: What should I cut off my fingers with . . .

    I also found a local business that has classes on using table saws. I think I will take that as a possible way to help not cut off my fingers.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,622

    Default Re: What should I cut off my fingers with . . .

    Also, I've been really impressed with the shopsmith mark v... worth)keeping an eye out for a reasonably priced (under $600) one on Craigslist. It is nice to have something handy to do almost anything on without talking mg down a setup on your table saw or drill press. If you get one with the band saw and joiner, it is well worth the price...and a darn neat speed control mechanism.

    Deknow
    The irony is free. It's the sarcasm you are paying for....ironically.
    -Felicity Jones in "Chalet Girl"

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