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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    145

    Default screened vs solid, long cold winters in mind

    I'm working on a warre. Was wondering your thoughts on the bottom boards.

    I'm considering building two, one with a screen and one without for winters. Kind of a pain to have to switch spring and fall but I thought it might help.

    Just picked up wood today and am getting started on the boxes.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Westchester NY
    Posts
    239

    Default Re: screened vs solid, long cold winters in mind

    Please don't take this the wrong way but this is asked weekly--try the search function for pages of answers and experiences
    http://www.peekskillnurseries.com
    Specialists in Ground Cover plants since 1937. Talk to me about ground-covers!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    145

    Default Re: screened vs solid, long cold winters in mind

    oh i undertand that but I think few are facing the challenges of overwintering severity we have up here...North Pole Alaska. I will definatly do some more diggin.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lazy Mountain, Alaska, USA
    Posts
    43

    Default Re: screened vs solid, long cold winters in mind

    I do not use warre other than to trap swarms. For my Langstroth hives I use a solid 3 1/2" deep bottom. 2" back from my opening, I have a 'ladder board' for the bees to gain access to the frames. This simulates an insitu bee hive in a hollow log. The dead air space acts as an insulative barrier for winter conditions. I have a 1/2" hole near the center of the bottom board that the bees seem to use in the warmer months to waste dead bees and mites and helps drain condensation. I do not use screened bottoms.
    Last edited by 779Hybrid410; 04-01-2013 at 07:25 PM. Reason: .
    My bees can hold it !

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Anchorage, AK, USA
    Posts
    18

    Default Re: screened vs solid, long cold winters in mind

    Hello AK_Dan!

    I use solid bottom boards for my Warre' hives here in Anchorage, AK. If you have the extra time to build I would try both. Let me know how it goes and good luck this season! Summer is on its way!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    145

    Default Re: screened vs solid, long cold winters in mind

    thanks guys!

    curious are you guys running any insulation in winters over them? I've seen some of the anchorage crew making slip overs out of blue board and other insulation. Also are you leaving your hives outdoors to over winter?

    I just ripped out two boxes...need to get some hardware to get things screwed and glued together. Managed to miss that little detail on the home depot run oops LOL!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    145

    Default Re: screened vs solid, long cold winters in mind

    Amen to "the look" lol!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Roxbury, MA
    Posts
    81

    Default Re: screened vs solid, long cold winters in mind

    I have what I'd found termed the "long winter sump style floor" on my warre - I can't find it anywhere right now, but it's got a screened bottom and if you imagine a normal screened bottom where the screen is on top of the wood with the hole in it and level with (or even slightly above) the door, this one is below the wood with the hole in it so that the door is about an inch above where the screen is. That way if a lot of bees die, they don't block up the entrance and prevent healthy bees from leaving the hive on cleansing flights. My girls didn't survive the summer last year (swarm + no viable replacement queen) but my beekeeping mentor says the only year he ever lost his bees was a year that he put a solid bottom board on - they died from having too much moisture in the hive + no ventilation. Of course he was keeping a lang, so maybe that was it too - they don't vent as well as warre do.
    HoneyintheRox.wordpress.com
    1 KTBH / 4 Foundationless Lang / 1 Warre

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Vashon Island, WA, USA
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: screened vs solid, long cold winters in mind

    I made sort of a bottom quilt for mine. It's similar to what HoneyintheRox describes except the sump is 5 1/2" deep, screen bottom, stubby feet, entrance is made by notching the top of the sump box and the box is filled with pine needles and wood chips. Got the idea from Phil Chandler's Pagoda Hive. It's an experiment, we'll see......

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    94

    Default Re: screened vs solid, long cold winters in mind

    I put screened bottom boards on all of the Warres I build, have for 3 years. But not the "open" screen bottom board, I use the slide board that goes in under the screen. The hive bottom is essentially solid until I slide the board out. I know it sounds funny, but I would never keep bees in an "open" screen bottom hive. Several reasons I use screen bottom boards with slides on my Warres. I think a slide board/solid bottom is healthier, (just a personal choice). A screen bottom board is certain death to Varroa mites that drop off or are groomed off in the hive and fall through the screen. Learning to "read" debris on slide boards helps in monitoring hive health. I use a flashlight and mirror to look up through the screen to monitor comb construction in the bottom box helping gauge when to add more boxes. On extremely hot days, (which are pretty rare here) I pull the slide board out a few inches exposing several inches of screen inside the hive near the entrance for ventilation. I have looked up under the hive through the screen and observed bees hanging on to the exposed screen and fanning during the heat.
    Keep on keepin' bees

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