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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,426

    Default Dado...or dadon't?

    The first dado I bought was a wobble type....not my cup of tea.

    With the purchase of a few used tools, I have a couple of 6" dado stacks.

    I also have an 8" stack (carbide tips) that I bought (I think around $50) that is a bit nicer (the wooden box it comes in makes it look better than it probably is).

    I've also been upgrading things in my shop, trying to make everything better...new fence and PAL's for the table saw, new speed control for the shopsmith, etc.

    In any case, the 8" doesn't cut a flat channel...which drives me nuts.

    We have a localish (15 miles away) custom blade shop that has top notch sharpening equipment. For $50 they will grind/sharpen the whole set together to give me a flat cut.

    Any thoughts on this...is this money well spent, or am I much better off buying a $100-$200 quality dado stack?

    deknow
    The irony is free. It's the sarcasm you are paying for....ironically.
    -Felicity Jones in "Chalet Girl"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bloomington In
    Posts
    797

    Default Re: Dado...or dadon't?

    I would sharpen them, I just bought a new one last week, hope I don't have the same problem.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Evansville, IN
    Posts
    2,225

    Default Re: Dado...or dadon't?

    Get them sharpened -- the similar set I got had a terrible job done on them at the factory, and i had to hone them with a diamond hone to get them to cut at all.

    Still much cheaper than a Freud set, which is about the only one you are going to get that cuts truly flat out of the box.

    Peter

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,426

    Default Re: Dado...or dadon't?

    Thanks....I guess my question is if, after sharpening/grinding (and I have no doubt that the shop doing it will do it to the highest standards), will I still wish I had spent the $$ (or maybe $$$$) on a better set to start with?

    deknow
    The irony is free. It's the sarcasm you are paying for....ironically.
    -Felicity Jones in "Chalet Girl"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Midland, MI
    Posts
    502

    Default Re: Dado...or dadon't?

    sharpen them, and be happy.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Huntington ,VT, USA
    Posts
    250

    Default Re: Dado...or dadon't?

    It is going to boil down to the quality of the carbide. If all your using it on is pine, and your not running high volume production I think re grinding them will be fine. If you will be working hardwoods or a lot of plywood/laminates then good carbide will hold up longer than crummy carbide.....which is not to say you have crummy carbide. Dull dados suck...they make lots of smoke and microfine dust....and like any dull tool, more dangerous.

    I suspect the production of quality carbide has become more common place, as I see a lot less really crappy stuff out there than I used to even at the low end of the cutting tool spectrum.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Cookeville, TN, USA
    Posts
    3,595

    Default Re: Dado...or dadon't?

    "In any case, the 8" doesn't cut a flat channel...which drives me nuts."
    5Y-25H-T-Z6b-0 winter losses in '14

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Fayetteville, Arkansas
    Posts
    5,018

    Default Re: Dado...or dadon't?

    Quote Originally Posted by deknow View Post
    Any thoughts on this...is this money well spent, or am I much better off buying a $100-$200 quality dado stack?
    I'd say try and save money as much as you can, but having quality tools is really a good thing, saving time, money, frustration, and replacement.

    I have an Oshlun 8" stack. http://www.amazon.com/Oshlun-SDS-084...ds=oshlun+dado Excellent set, very flat cut, and does the job quite handily. Now selling for about $85. I am very happy with it.

    So the question is, do you sharpen for $ or buy a new set for $$? It is an age old question. Seems like you're already upgrading....
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Huntington ,VT, USA
    Posts
    250

    Default Re: Dado...or dadon't?

    After thinking about it some I have actually never bought a dado (except the wobble style) that didn't cut a flat bottom when new....so that alone would make me worry a weee bit about the overall quality....but admittedly I am usually purchasing tools at the higher end of the market.

    Do the individual blades fit the arbor well...a tiny bit of overbore slop (or a worn arbor) will lead to uneven cut, as well as bearing wear from imbalance. Worn arbors are rare but I think you did say it was a used saw?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pueblo, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    603

    Default Re: Dado...or dadon't?

    If you have a good shop next to you that does quality work I would definitely get the carbide tipped blades sharpened. I've always had a problem with paying $20 to get an $18 blade sharpened but... after sharpening the blades out performed themselves fresh out of the package and seem to stay sharp longer. A good blade sharpener can probably fix your 'not a flat channel' problem too (can't fix a flat channel problem with a wobble type if that's what you were referring to). If anyone lives in my area these guys do excellent work: http://www.coloradosawandtool.com/

    Forgot you can mail blades in to them also if you're in a pinch for a good blade sharpener.
    Last edited by rwurster; 03-29-2013 at 02:50 PM.
    Zone 5a @ 4700 ft. High Desert
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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Taylor County, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    660

    Default Re: Dado...or dadon't?

    Sharpen. I just switched to a dado blade from a table saw + router table (for the frame rests). It was the best thing I've ever done. I'm about to get mine sharpened by a local shop.

    I think we might have the same one. It's a Mimbro or something like that. It's a cheapy, and the wooden box makes it look nicer. I got it for free and plan to use it until it can't be sharpened anymore.

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